Day At The Track
Judy Magie

Smoke Pan Mirrors has been a huge blessing

Freehold, NJ --- Judy Magie gets emotional when she talks about Smoke Pan Mirrors. The 10-year-old harness racing female pacer might not be a household name around the nation, but she is a beloved member of the Magie family’s home in central New Jersey. Purchased as a yearling for $5,500 by Judy and her husband, trainer Brian Magie Jr., at the 2008 Standardbred Horse Sale, Smoke Pan Mirrors has won 39 of 271 career races and earned $409,108 in purses. She’s done it the hard way, never winning a race worth more than $20,000 and never competing in a claiming race. She has never won more than $72,202 in a season, or less than $33,348, and averaged nearly 40 starts a year since turning age 6. And she just keeps going. On Thursday night, Smoke Pan Mirrors competes in a conditioned race at the Meadowlands, where she is 9-1 on the morning line with Brett Miller in the sulky. Her race leads the one-hour “Meadowlands Harness Live” broadcast beginning at 9:30 p.m. on SNY. “When we bought her at the sale that day, never would I have imagined what she’s been to my family,” Judy said. “You can always count on her to take care of us. It’s a blessing. It’s a huge blessing. She’s really been a gift from God. We love her. We just treat her like family, because she is. She’s just been so good to us.” Smoke Pan Mirrors is a daughter of stallion No Pan Intended out of the broodmare Sleight Of Pan. She was Sleight Of Pan’s sixth foal, but first by 2003 Horse of the Year No Pan Intended. “We noticed a lot of times that mares bred to No Pan Intended would come to life, so to speak,” Brian said. “We were going mostly on conformation, and she was gorgeous. The fact the mare had a few foals, and this was the first No Pan Intended, we liked that combination. We were thrilled to get her. We loved her.” Smoke Pan Mirrors raced on the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes circuit at age 2, finishing second to future multiple-stakes-winner Dancinwiththestarz in her series debut. She also finished second in a division of the Arden Downs that season. At 3, she won twice in the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes Stallion Series. Two years later, she posted one of her biggest victories, winning the Fillies & Mares Open at Tioga Downs. She might be one of the hardest-working women in harness racing. Smoke Pan Mirrors has started at least one race in 84 of the past 85 months, including the most recent 21 in a row. And if you’re a driver, there’s a good chance you’ve sat behind her. A total of 53 different drivers have been in the sulky for her races. “She’s been so durable and enjoys her job, so it’s kind of hard to shut her down,” Brian said. “In this day and age, with the hard racetracks and the style of racing, you don’t find this durability just anywhere. I think it’s just a tribute to her conformation; she was put together the way you want a horse to be put together. The drivers all love her. Nobody says she’s a Cadillac anymore, but she always has been. “We just hope that someday she passes those traits off to her offspring. We’re looking forward to the day when we can train one of her babies. I think in my heart that she will be a good broodmare.” Smoke Pan Mirrors resides in a stall at the end of a row nearest the stable’s office. In the stall next to her is 9-year-old stallion Voice Of Truth, himself a $456,177-earner in his career, bred by Judy Magie and Pine Creek Stables. “They’re like an old married couple,” Judy said. “They’re just as happy as can be.” Keeping Smoke Pan Mirrors happy is one of the keys to her longevity on the racetrack. She has a routine -- first out to the field in the morning and then last to jog or train, followed immediately by lunch. “She’s a bit of a diva,” Judy said, laughing, “But she’s just a really fun horse.” “She’s set in her ways, just like most women,” Brian said, also laughing. “But she’s a sweetheart. My 1-year-old son (Luke) could walk in there and she wouldn’t hurt him. She’s good to be around. She’s a pleasure. She doesn’t owe us anything. We have great respect for her and what she’s done over the years. We’re always trying to think about what’s best for her.” When the time comes for Smoke Pan Mirrors to retire from racing and focus on motherhood, she will do it right at home. “She’ll get to spend the rest of her life as a broodmare at our house. We still have Voice Of Truth’s mother (Shandelle Hanover). They bought our farm, so they’ll get to live out their days there. “I’m happy to be able to do that for her.”  by Ken Weingartner, Harness Racing Communications 

Pat O'Brien

Multi-million dollar fraud trial underway

Patrick O’Brien, the former Harness Racing NZ chairman, appeared by video-link in a the Wellington High Court on his 83rd birthday on Monday. He is accused, with his son, Mike O’Brien, and two others, of multiple counts of obtaining gambling licenses and funds via deception. The doyen of New Zealand’s racing industry, now frail and infirm, denies the charges against him, as do the other three. The prosecution asserts that Mike O’Brien, 58, described in court as a racing lobbyist engaged in helping racing venues to obtain grants, was denied a gambling license in 2005 for reasons of conflict of interest. Subsequently, it’s alleged, he encouraged others to establish companies on his behalf in order to obtain gambling licenses. Also on trial is Paul Max, 60, and a former Department of Internal Affairs employee who cannot be named for legal reasons. The Department of Internal Affairs is responsible in New Zealand for issuing licenses under the Gambling Act.     Grants For Cash It’s alleged that Mike O’Brien controlled millions in pokie profits for his own purposes via a company called Bluegrass Holdings. He also allegedly ran a scheme where he received kickbacks from racing clubs in return for grants. Prosecutor Grant Burston said Michael O’Brien exercised “significant influence” over Bluegrass Holdings, a fact that the others were aware of, and which they concealed from Internal Affairs Inspectors. Charitable trusts, such as Bluegrass claimed to be, are permitted to distribute the proceeds of their gambling operations to underfunded racing venues. But, according to Burston, Mike O’Brien ensured those proceeds went to the clubs that gave him the best kickbacks. Racing Ain’t What it Used To Be In an interview with the New Zealand Herald, apparently conducted two years ago when the fraud investigation was launched, but first published only last week, Mike’s father Patrick claimed he set up Bluegrass for the benefit of clubs after government funding dried up.    “The taxes the government take out of it don’t leave enough for the clubs to exist on,” he said. “When I was growing up you went to the pictures on your push bike and on Saturday there was nothing else to do unless you played football. “Now everyone goes to the beach or goes to the hills. They’ve got casinos to go to and pokie machines to go to. The pubs are open to midnight. A day at the races is no longer the attraction it used to be. They’re not betting now what they were betting 30 years ago. “The take for the clubs, particularly those with poor dates and country venues … they’re not getting enough to exist.“ The prosecution intends to call 46 witness, while the trial is expected to last six weeks. By Kylie Taylor Reprinted with permission of the onlinecasino.com site

Most Happy Fella sails to victory at Roosevelt Raceway

Remembering Roosevelt Raceway

Roosevelt Raceway, once located in Westbury, New York, was initially created as a track for motor racing. Cars raced on the crude and curvy track until 1937, but the track proved too challenging for the race cars of that era. It was later converted to a half-mile harness racing track and the gates opened on Sept. 2, 1940, to a reported crowd of 5,000 eager fans who wagered some $40,000. Roosevelt was the first track to use the now universal "mobile starting gate," introduced by a man named George Levy. In the 1940s, harness racing was considered a slightly inferior form of horse racing in comparison to thoroughbred racing. Levy promoted the sport and was instrumental in its appeal to the mostly affluent Long Island community of New York. The original structures at Roosevelt, by 1956, were in disrepair. A facelift and renovation took place and the transformation was remarkable. The new track boasted five large levels, with security on all floors. A 14-bed hospital with a fully functional operating room, radio and TV broadcast rooms and two restaurants added to the appeal. A new synthetic surface was installed on the track and 105,000 watts of new lighting allowed patrons to see the horses run at night. This was the Taj Mahalof harness venues at the time. Unfortunately, the track wasn't without drama. On Nov. 8, 1963, only two horses made it to the finish line following a mid-race crash. The race was declared official, angering many of the 23,000 fans. A small riot started out with people throwing rocks and bottles, but soon escalated to the mob smashing the tote board and wrecking the judges' booth. They also set fires, fought with police and firefighters and there were many injuries and arrests. It has been thought that the introduction of off-track betting in 1971 in New York led to the demise of Roosevelt Raceway. Others speculate the opening of The Meadowlands racetrack in 1976, just an hour away, also could have contributed to the track's failure. It's hard to pinpoint why Roosevelt Raceway was so special to so many people, but I do have a few theories. The atmosphere was more laid-back than any thoroughbred arena or harness track that I've been to. It was also a very social place, with more local people being able to attend the nighttime racing rather than a daytime event. The track was only 12 miles from my house and it was comforting that our little group basically had the entire second floor to ourselves, every night. Harness racing was more exciting than the movies or bowling for most people, too. Pizza, hot dogs and beer were available, providing all the essential nutrients required of a horse player. Today, the parking area of Roosevelt Raceway is a shopping center, complete with a movie theater. The grandstand area is now a luxury condominium complex and the stable area is under a Home Depot. Whatever led to the track's closure in 1988 is a shame. By Pete Monaco, The Eighth Pole Reprinted with permission of  The Spectrum

Peptide VNFYAWK

Disqualified for 16 years for Peptide VNFYAWK

Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards commenced an Inquiry on 5 October 2017 into the results of the following out-of-competition blood samples taken from horses in the care of trainer Mr Shaun (Anthony) Simiana: FRANCO TIAGO NZ                          Sample collected on 17 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK                        Sample collected on 17 April 2016 FRANCO TIAGO NZ                          Sample collected on 18 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK                        Sample collected on 18 April 2016 WALKABOUT CREEK                        Sample collected on 3 May 2016 Those samples were reported to contain the prohibited substance Peptide VNFYAWK. On 5 October 2016, HRNSW Stewards issued eight (8) charges against Mr Simiana and adjourned the Inquiry to allow Mr Simiana to consider those charges. The Inquiry resumed on 7 December 2016 at which time Mr Simiana’s legal representatives made a number of requests and further applications. Following correspondence between the parties, due to the fact that no submissions were received from Mr Simiana in response to the charges issued by 20 January 2017, HRNSW Stewards considered the matter on the evidence that was before them, in the absence of any submissions. Mr Simiana was found guilty of all charges and advised through his legal representative of that decision. Mr Simiana was provided with an opportunity to provide submissions in relation to the matter of penalty by COB 3 February 2017. Following an extension until COB 7 February 2017, no submissions were received and HRNSW Stewards considered the matter of penalty. Mr Simiana was issued with the following penalties: In relation to Charges 1,2,3,4 & 7, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190A(1)(a), Mr Simiana was disqualified for a period of six (6) years to be served concurrently; In relation to Charges 5,6 & 8, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 196A(1)(i) & (2) Mr Simiana was disqualified for a period of ten (10) years to be served concurrently. HRNSW Stewards ordered that the two (2) periods of disqualification imposed be served cumulatively. Therefore Mr Simiana was disqualified for a total period of 16 years to commence from 28 July 2016, the date upon which he was stood down. HRNSW Stewards also considered the disqualification of the subject horses pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190A(1)(b) as follows: AHRR 190A         (1)  When a sample taken at any time from a horse being trained or cared for by a licensed person has detected in it any prohibited substance specified in sub-rule (2):- (b)  The horse may be disqualified from any race in which it has competed subsequent to the taking of such a sample where, in the opinion of the Stewards, the prohibited substance was likely to have had any direct and/or indirect effect on the horse at the time of the race. Consequently, Stewards ordered the following disqualifications: FRANCO TIAGO NZ be disqualified as the winner of Race 5 at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 19 April 2016; FRANCO TIAGO NZ be disqualified as the winner of Race 2 at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 30 April 2016; WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its fourth place at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 19 April 2016; WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its second place at Dubbo on 29 April 2016; WALKABOUT CREEK be disqualified from its third place at Tabcorp Park Menangle on 14 May 2016. In addition, HRNSW Stewards ordered that Mr Simiana pay to HRNSW within 14 days of being advised of the Steward’s Decision, the sum of $15,000 as costs pertaining to the analytical tests that were costs borne by the Controlling Body in relation to the prohibited substances from his horses, pursuant to NSW Local Rule 256A as follows: NSWLR256A       (1)  The Stewards, having determined after an inquiry or investigation to impose a penalty upon a person for a breach of, or offence under, these Rules, may make such order as they think fit as to the payment of costs by that person in part or full of any costs and expenses incurred by the Controlling Body in connection with that inquiry or investigation.                 (2)  A costs order made under this Rule is additional to, and does not form part of, any penalty imposed upon the person.  However the order as to costs does form part of the decision made by Stewards, and is not intended to be protected from any rights of Appeal the person may have. (3)  A costs order is payable as a debt to the Controlling Body within 14 days of notification of the quantum of the order, whether orally or in writing, to the person.  Failure to comply with the terms of payment, or to enter into a payment arrangement satisfactory to the Controlling Body, may lead to the person being placed on the Unpaid Forfeit List. Mr Simiana has lodged an appeal. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY OFFICER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

It is my great pleasure to announce that our entire development of 246 apartments (Stages 1 & 2) has officially sold out. Since launching in 2015 our development has been seen as one of the city’s largest brownfield developments and has been dubbed Auckland’s fastest selling project of its size. The success of the development was confirmed in a recent Colliers International residential project survey which assessed 27 ‘off the plan’ projects across Auckland (competitors and Colliers projects) for the first six months of last year. The Colliers survey revealed that during that period Alexandra Park was number one across several categories including ‘total sales volume’ and ‘total sales value’ beating all other individual CBD, city and fringe projects. At the same time, Alexandra Park took out the top spot for ‘market share’ and ‘total sales by location’ when compared to all other fringe projects. Will Coates, Projects Manager in Residential Projects Marketing at Colliers International publicly declared that Alexandra Park has well and truly broken a historic mould. “Auckland has historically seen large apartment developments in the CBD. After all, 64% of Auckland’s total apartment stock is located in the CBD - so to see a city fringe project of Alexandra Park’s size do so well is extremely rare,” he says. “Alexandra Park is not only selling high quality apartments, but it’s offering an entire master-planned community, including a retail High Street, as well as all the existing amenities the Auckland Trotting Club brings to the location. No other development in Auckland has ever offered this kind of mix before, and this I believe is where a large part of their success lies." - Will Coates, Colliers International.   PROJECT UPDATE As you all know last year the wind, rain and ground conditions were all against us. As a result we have suffered delays in both projects. However, we’ve worked hard to keep you informed along the way and the project remains an outstanding success. As was noted at October’s AGM of the Auckland Trotting Club, the financial objectives and milestones associated with 223 Green Lane West have all been met or surpassed. Unlike some other developments that have been in the news, Auckland Trotting Club Inc has been around since 1890 and, as you well know, is not going anywhere. Such certainty has been a huge asset for our project. Although we are disappointed by the construction delays they are not unusual for developments in Auckland particularly those of this size and scale. Rest assured, we are now determined to make up time.    East Gate is now really starting to really take shape and is now completely out of the ground. While for Sightline Green and High Street the slabs have started to be poured and you should start to see steel coming out of the ground over the coming months.  With over 100 people now working on both sites it’s getting exciting.     East Gate | Building A Long-time New Zealand-owned construction company, Canam, is building East Gate, with Loukas Petrou the Managing Director of Canam.   Loukas reports: “The piling foundations have been completed and the construction of the two underground basements for car parking and other amenities is about 100% completed. The stair cores are steadily rising up and the structural steel framework is closely following behind. Backfilling operations behind the retaining walls have commenced and the off-site manufacturing of precast panels is well underway. It is expected that the project will start moving faster once the ground floor level is completed as we will be in a repetitive structural cycle by then." Building A Drone Shots, 2017 Sightline Green and High Street |  Buildings B1 & B2 Respected Australasian construction company Ganellen is responsible for Sightline Green and High Street. Michael Doig is Ganellen’s New Zealand Director: Michael reports: “The year has started well on Buildings B1 and B2. We have completed our basement slab pour to B1 and are currently installing our first basement precast panels to the perimeter walls. As our structure continues one can really get a sense of the scale of this exciting project. Our structural steel commences on site from mid-February and will quickly reach level one as we erect columns from the basement to level one in a single span.”   Building B Drone Shots, 2017 WHO BOUGHT THE 246 APARTMENTS?  Colliers International’s market analysis last year of apartment buyers at Alexandra Park revealed increasing numbers of local Auckland families and younger people were signing up. Statistics showed that over 40% of buyers into the B buildings are younger than 45 years old. Overall we’ve got plenty of professional couples, mixed in with young and mature families, baby-boomers and empty nesters. Also pleasing is that the overall owner-occupier numbers remain high – far outnumbering those describing themselves as investors. We’ve also attracted a lot of locals, with the buyer statistics showing many of you already live within five kilometres of Alexandra Park. We’re delighted that our quality development and first-class location has attracted a quality bunch of residents that will soon call Alexandra Park home. We’re not only going to create a whole new heart for Epsom, but a whole new community which will hopefully get involved in racing! One thing’s for sure this new Auckland neighbourhood will be the envy of many.   STAGE THREE? Some of you tell me you’ve got friends or family who are interested in also becoming Alexandra Park residents, but are now worried they may have missed out. They are not alone as the public interest in us launching another stage has been considerable. I can report that we have commenced with the investigative work for Stage 3 after receiving member’s approval at the October AGM.  This work is now ongoing and subject to the economics matching what we promised members, we hope to make an announcement on the launch of this stage later this year. It is interesting to note that we have over 1,000 people ready and waiting to hear more about our next apartments on our database and another 100 waiting for our premium product to become available.   RACING President Bruce Carter and the board of the ATC have announced that in 2018 we will be increasing stakes by $40K per race meeting and the reaction from owners and the industry has been really positive. Meanwhile, for those of you who haven’t heard, Kevin Smith, Racing Manager has joined HRNZ as an independent Handicapper with a focus on the North Island and bottom of the South Island.  Taking his place is his Assistant Racing Manager, Regan Cotter who has hit the ground as our new Racing Manager. We look forward to continuing to deliver a high-quality racing programme and your board and management remained focused on turning the industry around in the North. Franklin is currently fully occupied and Karen Blanchard and her team are doing an outstanding job of running this for us.  Her team is now handling 235 horses in work who choose to train on our tracks in Pukekohe.     THE BUSINESS Over this year you will see that Joel Reichardt, Sales and Marketing Manager, Chris Paul, Food and Beverage Manager, Richard Harris, Executive Chef and their teams have introduced a series of new themed race night events and some special events to attract new audiences.  Our first event – Chinese New Year was a sell out and our Fashion at the Oaks is nearly sold out… so if you are wishing to attend you better book quickly! The Alex has been doing really well under Stephanie Campbell and her team and they too have been increasing their business with new events and activities such as Quiz Night, Blues Bar, and various clubs and group meetings. Gaye Wilson has been busy getting new uniforms for our staff which is now being rolled out across the venue. Property has been extremely busy with various repairs and obviously a particular concentration has been given to the grounds and the track.   THE FUTURE Auckland Trotting Club Inc is on track to be one of the leading clubs across the codes in New Zealand. As stated earlier in this newsletter we will meet or exceed every target promised to members for the development. At the same time, many other aspects of our business are performing strongly. We remain totally committed to delivering on our comprehensive business strategy that the board and members worked so hard on - not only to secure the club’s future but to help lift the prospects of our industry. Your board and management continue to challenge, create, develop and implement a wide range of initiatives that add value across our portfolio. Our ultimate objective is to create profits that are then invested in the sustainability of harness racing and our business. Thank you all most sincerely for your continued support. In turn the Auckland Trotting Club will work hard to ensure Alexandra Park remains the premier racing venue in Australasia. Dominique Dowding Chief Executive

DOVER, Del.--- It was de ja vu all-over-again in the Tuesday, Feb. 28 harness racing feature at Dover Downs. In a near recreation of last week's meeting, Barbara's Shadow beat Dismissal, still the odds-on public choice, to the finish line in the $15,000 Mares 4&5-Year-Old pace to score her second win in-a-row, third in her last four and fifth victory in 2017. Vic Kirby left fastest with Barbara's Shadow then yielded to Dismissal and Yannick Gingras, as had happened the previous Tuesday. Gingras controlled the pace as Dismissal held off a brief encounter with On Your Six (George Dennis) at the three quarters with Barbara's Shadow remaining in the garden spot. Turning for home on the straightaway Kirby pulled his Shadow Play-Bababababarbarapan four-year-old quickly to the outside to engage Dismissal for several steps then rush past to post a 1:51.4 victory by a neck amid a light shower. Kirby, trainer Leigh Raymer and Brian Offfecker own the winner of five of eight races this year with a second and a third earning $44,922 and $$80,136 lifetime. In The Shadows (Tony Morgan) picked up third money. Tim Tetrtick guided JFE Enterprise's Scandalicious to her first win of the year taking the fast daughter of American Ideal-The Company Store right to the front and never looking back en route to a 1:52.1 decisive win. Westluckycam (Gingras) was runner-up. That Woman Hanover (Art Stafford Jr.) was the show finisher. Scandalicious now has won 23 times in her career for a $372,655 bankroll. The win was also the 977th win for trainer Scott DiDomenico. Tim Tetrick drove a triple, Vic Kirby, Jim Morand, owner-trainer Leigh Ramer and trainer Les Givens had two wins each. EARL'S SPEEDER, CELEBRITY PEGASUS BATTLE AGAIN IN $15,000 FEATURE TROT WEDNESDAY Last week Earl's Speeder overtook Celebrity Pegasus for a neck victory, this time Earl's Speeder gets the outside post 8 in the Wednesday, March 1 $15,000 4&5-Year-Old Winners-Over trot. Post time is 4:30 p.m. The nightly feature is usually the 10th race, but this Wednesday, it will be showcased as the 3rd races. Mike Casalino owns Earl's Speeder, who has won two of his last three starts with Corey Callahan. Celebrity Pegasus was the race favorite last Wednesday and Art Stafford Jr. took the lead after the quarter and held it until the final strides finishing second by a neck for owners Ken Wood, Bill Dittmar, Steve Iaquinta and Minisink Farms. Front trotting Marley's Guy and Tim Tetrick drew the rail while Bobby Glassmeyer's Streamsong and Jonathan Roberts is alongside. Dover trotting guru Vic Kirby and Chris Giaccio own Steel Reserve who has been in top form. Machuca with Yannick Gingras; Tate Lewis' Bowdie De Vie handled by Allan Davis, and Don Marine's Lucky Ten K, a winner last time, driven by Ross Wolfenden complete the lineup. In the sub-feature, Bluebird Reverend (Montrell Teague) heads a nine-horse contingent which also includes Robbins Next Farms' Keystone Orion (Roberts), Antonio Buttitta's Muscerne (Tony Morgan), Baximum (Russ Foster) leaving from the rail for Tina and Joe Clark. In yet another top trot, former Hambletonian winner Market Share gets regular driver Tim Tetrick back and drew post 1 facing Bill Cantrell's Deacons Valley (Gingras) and RBH Ventures and Spangnola's Guiltywithanexcuse (Callahan) in another toss up contest. Weekday post time for Monday through Thursday racing is 4:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays are dark days. Parking and admission are free. Reservations are suggested for the Winner's Circle Restaurant's acclaimed Buffet and for the 4-star Dover Downs Hotel. Call 302-674-4600. Top harness and thoroughbred races are featured in the Racing and Sports Book daily for 12 Noon until 12 Midnight. Marv Bachrad

LEBANON, OH. - It started with 79 hopeful $5000 male claimers in Round 1, was narrowed to 40 in Round 2, then down to 20 for Round 3. It culminated with 10 harness racing finalists on Tuesday (Feb. 28) afternoon at Miami Valley Raceway when the championship leg of the "Survivor Series" went postward for a $20,000 purse. Shakerattlenrock, who scored two wins and a 'neck' defeat in the first three legs, used his customary front-end style to capture the title in 1:54 over a track listed as sloppy. Trainer-driver Brady Galliers, who has been enjoying significant success-most of it with quick-leaving stalwarts from his own stable-asked Shakerattlenrock for early foot when starter Mike Woebkenberg opened the starting car wings and he responded with a :26.4 first panel. Rebuffing an early challenge by Hay Goodlooking, Galliers took no prisoners through subsequent splits of :56.3 and 1:24.3 before closing in :29.2 to seal the deal. Jagger Blue Chip (Kayne Kauffman) enjoyed a pocket ride throughout to finish second, while Volo (Trace Tetrick) proved best of the rest. Amanda, Emily and Darla Gaskin of Indiana own Shakerattlenrock, an 8-year-old son of Rocknroll Hanover. As the favorite, he returned $5.80 to win. A race earlier, Walter White (John DeLong) triumphed in the weekly $22,000 Open Trot, besting Somebody AS (Trace Tetrick) and Parkhill Lancelot (Mike Oosting). As 2-1 co-favorites, Walter White and Somebody AS raced one-two throughout mile, stopping teletimers in :27.4, :57.3, 1:25.3 and 1:54.3. Final Breath used a strong first-over brush to threaten the leaders at the three-quarters station, but made an uncharacteristic break in stride shortly thereafter. Jim Eaton trains Walter White for Robert Silberberg. The 5-year-old Cantab Hall gelding's scorecard now reads 13-8-2 in 64 starts, good for $317,651 in earnings. Gregg Keidel  

In harness racing the ‘Tact’ prefix is steeped in history dating back to the 1940s when the Light Brigade mare Tactic was born. She was from the famous First Water family that have left many winners in Southland – some associated with the Dynes family. The Tact family which has left champion race horses Tactile, Noodlum and Blacks A Fake lives on in Southland, now under the guidance of Bessie Dynes, her daughter Diane and her partner Trevor Proctor. And judging by the quality of some of the family’s recent winners the name is set to stay and perform into more generations. It was Tactile though that got the breed it’s earliest recognition. He was a champion New Zealand juvenile in the early 1960s -  winning five Derbies as a three year old; a feat unparalleled in Australasian Standardbred history. Tactile was part owned and trained in Southland by the late Derek Dynes who shared in the ownership of him with cousin Jim Dynes. After his racing days were over he sired 316 foals, leaving 79 winners. The best of these was Tac Warrior. “That was one regret we had, that Dad never got to see him race overseas. And if Dad was here now he would have the most incredible memory of family bloodlines. It was his passion.” said Diane. The Tact horses have not only shone overseas, they have also provided plenty of highlights on the domestic front. And 83 year old Bessie Dynes (wife of the late Derek) has certainly enjoyed being there to see them. “I just used to watch them race. I loved watching them,” she said. Despite her age Bessie remains hands on and keeps herself busy helping Proctor at the stables just down the road from where she lives. “She still goes round to the boxes. She shattered her shoulder a couple of months ago and had a total shoulder replacement,” said Diane. “She does the boxes better now that she has a new shoulder. I think the new shoulder has made all the difference because she used to leave a bit of shit behind,” added Trevor laughing. On the breeding front the Dynes family still have plenty of well bred mares to carry on the Tact name. Tactwyn a daughter of Tactics is the fourth dam of Tact Lizzie, one of the quality mares Bessie and Diane are breeding from today. As a race mare Tact Lizzie won ten races with her biggest win coming in the Group One 2010 PGG Wrightson New Zealand Breeders Stakes. She was one of the outsiders paying $64.30 to win. She has passed on her ability to her foals. From four live foals she’s left the talented Tact Tate (McArdle) which won three races in a short career here before heading to Australia. Tact Tate “As a foal he was that shy you couldn’t get near his head. We had to give him cuddles. Then he went the opposite and thought he was pretty smart,” said Trevor. He won a further eight races in Aussie and five of those, he won in a row. His best win to date was the Nestle Professional 4 year old Bonanza at Melton where he paced a mile in 1-51.9. He also ran fourth in last season’s Chariot Of Fire and finished his season winning the Group Three Mount Eden at Menanagle. Tact Tate just last week at Menangle winning the Group 1 Bohemia Crystal Tact Lizzie’s second foal Tact Rousey (Art Major) also looks promising, winning once last season and running a number of placings from just ten starts. “She ran a quarter in 24.8 one day out here and under a hold. I’ve never had a horse that’s done that. If we can get her right she’ll win two or three races down here quite easily,” said Trevor. Tact Lizzie’s third foal is by Lis Mara and the family have had to wait on her to develop. “I worked her in the cart for the second time today. She’s big and solid and a beautiful pacer. I said to Ian Wilson if she’s got speed she’ll win races as she’s such a nice mover,” he said. Her latest foal is a yearling filly by Art Major. Tact Lizzie is currently in foal to Rock N Roll Hanover. Although her progeny will continue to be tried by the family there could be a shift in focus down the track. “As we get older and get sick of the racing we may breed them for the sales. Once you get a horse like Tact Tate doing his thing in Australia and if Tact Rousey comes up her foals are going to be worth a bit,” said Trevor. Tact Hayley has also been the star of the Dynes broodmare band. She has left the winners of forty five races with her best being Tact Hayley Jane (Albert Albert) 10 wins, Tact Lizzie (Christian Cullen) 10 wins, Spectactular (Christian Cullen) 10 wins and Tact Major (Art Major) 7 wins. Despite being the ripe old age of 24 she is still being bred from and has left untried stock by Christian Cullen and Auckland Reactor. She’s due to foal to Art Major. “Ian Wilson broke the Auckland Reactor filly in for me as a yearling. He’s broken in a lot of horses and never broken in anything like it. She’s such a natural. She ran a quarter in 35 as a yearling.” The Dynes are also breeding from two of Tact Hayley’s daughters - Tact Hayley Jane and Tact Marie Knight (In the Pocket). Tact Hayley Jane’s best foal so far in the Bettor’s Delight mare Tact Hayley’s Delight. She’s won over $250,000 - winning four races in New Zealand and a further ten in Australia. Her best wins came in the Group Three Baby Bling Stakes and the Group Two Sibelia Stakes. Tact Marie Knight is also on the board, producing Ideal Tact (American Ideal) which won two races here and a further eleven in Australia. They are also breeding from Tact Ruby (Better’s Delight – Tact Marie Knight) and Tact Charlotte (Bettor’s Delight – Tact Hayley Jane). They’ve leased Tact Ruby, recently leased Delightful Tactic to Macca Lodge, and sold Tact Aunty. Flash Tactics is another mare on the property, but despite winning eight races as a racehorse she’s been a shy breeder and was last bred from in 2013. One mare from the family that performed on the racetrack but didn’t do so well as a broodmare was Tact Boyden. She won seven of her nineteen starts and ran third in the 1982 DB Fillies Final at Addington behind Rain Girl and Capri. “Dad sold her to the States for something like 90 grand. That was massive money. He bought a good chunk of a farm in Ashburton with that. We paid $25,000 to buy her back.” Her best foal was Tactical Manoeuvre which was by Soky’s Atom and won four of her seven starts for Mid-Canterbury trainer Brian Saunders. She won her first two start at Greymouth in 1994. The Dynes and Proctor primarily operate from their 5 acres home block which is opposite the Winton Race course. But they also own the house next door which has a further 6 acres attached to it and they lease a further 60 acres from Bessie and Diane’s brother Robert. “We foal our mares here on the home property but graze them up the road on the 60 acres “said Diane. “When dad came back from Ashburton (1993) he may have had 25 mares on the property and Trevor and I did the foaling for a couple of years so we got to know what went on.” One of the pair’s earliest memories in the foaling paddock was of a mare’s desperate attempt to save her foal. “One of Dad’s mares foaled and the foal was born dead. The mare tried to revive it. She was sucking the foal’s nostrils and the wee foals head would come up and then bang on the ground. She did it over and over. She was desperate to revive the foal. It was amazing,” said Diane. Trevor also has some memories from that time. “I had to stay with a mare for a couple of hours and get the foal on but she would bite it and go to savage it like it was foreign. She and I were mates so when I gave her a smack she knew right from wrong. Once the foal got sucking she was away. If I wasn’t there she would have killed it.” And there are two other foalings that stand out in Diane’s mind. “We had a young maiden mare who was unaware that she had foaled. The foal was lying behind her and I guess in hindsight we should have spun the foal around and got it on her feet so she could lick it and mother it. But she didn’t and she didn’t want to have anything to do with. Also when we foaled Flash Tactic who was a bit of a pet to us she followed Trevor across the paddock and left the foal in the middle of the paddock on its own. Then she realised.”  Away from training horses Trevor also runs a small painting and decorating business. He was also a top provincial rugby referee for 15 years. “I was number two at one stage behind Paddy O’Brien. I also coached the top five referees but had to give it up because there was no time for the horses. ” He comes from a non racing background, hailing from the Southland coalmining town of Ohai. “I was mates with the Franklins and they used to have horses. I used to go down there and ride them at the weekend. When I met Diane I went up to Ashburton and Tony Kelly said do you want a drive? I got into doing fast work and loved it.” Diane also runs her own business called Renu. Renu has a range of knitwear using recycled woollen clothes which she gets from the Salvation Army and Op Shops and then crafts into one off garments. She says everything’s recycled and she has 80-100 garments on the rack at any one time. “It’s all about balance. I started off that part of the business because I felt I needed to do something I really enjoyed doing. We were nominated for an award in the Benson and Hedges Awards in Wellington twenty five years ago and we made an outfit for Linda Jones once. So that’s as famous as I’ve got. I do workshops and teach as well and hope to go overseas in the near future.” Her biggest markets are Wanaka A&P Show and the Arrowtown Autumn Festival Market. With the Tact and Dynes names still very much to the fore, there’s plenty to go on with, both on the creative and breeding front. There’s likely another good horse or an awarding garment, just around the next corner.    Bruce Stewart Southland Harness racing

The long-awaited clash between Tasmania's most promising three-year-old harness racing pacers Scooterwillrev and Usain Jolt might not eventuate until they meet in the Tasmanian Derby in April. Both three-year-olds scored impressive wins in Launceston on Sunday night with Usain Jolt scoring by 30 metres despite having faced the breeze for the last lap in a C1 against older horses over 2200 metres. But not to be upstaged Scooterwillrev went around in a three-year-old and older event over 2200 metres to score by six metres in a small field of six but he clocked a mile rate of 2.02.5 and ran home his last half (800m) in 58.9 after galloping at the start which had him settled 20 metres off the second-last horse. However Usain Jolt recorded a mile rate of 1.59.5, running home his last half in 57.5 and his driver Ricky Duggan said the Tony Petersen-trained Village Jolt gelding could have gone quicker and won by further had he so desired. "This horse has gone to another level this time in and this win was terrific," Duggan said. "I'm mindful that he didn't defeat any top class horses but you can only beat what you're up against and he did it with ease. "Last time in he used to do a few things wrong and he was rough in his gait and he was still like it at his first start this season but Tony (Petersen) has changed a couple of things and he's been much better his past two starts. Usain Jolt won last season's $30,000 Dandy Patch Stakes and his main mission this season is the three-year-old version of that sires stakes event, the $30,000 Globe Derby, to be run in Launceston in May and Scooterwillrev (Somebeachsomewhere)  is ineligible because he is not Tasmanian bred. But given the gelding's recent efforts that produced winning margins of 33.7 metres and 30.4 metres there is no question the Tasmanian Derby is within his grasp. "I haven't let this horse rip yet so who knows what times he's capable of running. "He's done it tough the past two starts facing the breeze but I am pretty sure he could be even better sat up in a race." Scooterwillrev is unbeaten in Tasmania with only two unplaced starts in Victoria during the Breeders Crown series the only blemishes on his impeccable record from 11 lifetime starts. Duggan is keen to stick with Usain Jolt and says the gelded son of Village Jolt has a very bright future. "The improvement Usain Jolt is has shown this season suggests he will give Scooterwillrev a run for his money in the Derby provided his manners remain at least the same as his past two runs." Scooterwillrev and Usain Jolt are likely to have at least one more start each before progressing to the Derby with Scooterwillrev to back up in a race in Devonport on Sunday night. Peter Staples

Las Vegas, NV --- Russell Williams was elected president of the USTA by a vote of Association directors during the first general session of the USTA board of directors annual meeting Monday (Feb. 27) at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino. Williams, who represents District 7 as a membership director and most recently served as the Association’s vice chairman, was elected by a majority vote over four other candidates through two rounds of balloting of the 54 USTA directors in attendance. In the first ballot, Williams received 22 votes of the 28 needed to be elected. Joe Pennacchio of District 6 received 17 votes. Jason Settlemoir of District 8 received 14 votes. USTA member Ryan Macedonio received 1 vote; and USTA member Fred Hudson received zero votes. Before the second ballot was conducted, Hudson withdrew from the race and endorsed Settlemoir. In the second ballot, Williams received the 28 required votes. Pennacchio received 19 votes. Settlemoir received 7 votes. Macedonio received 0 votes. Williams, who works as chairman of both the Standardbred Horse Sales Co. and Hanover Shoe Farms, campaigned on a platform that the USTA is doing good work in the industry, citing statistics that mares bred in North America were up more than 700 in 2016 than in 2015. “We don’t have regulatory authority,” said Williams, 63. “Commissions have that. They also have enforcement authority. But we have something quite powerful: we have ideas. A good idea -- sooner or later -- is going to be embraced. Commissions watch us. And when we deliberate and argue over these rules, commissions watch and see what we think as a breed. “The excellent ideas that come from this board, from members and from staff, are a wealth of ideas that can solve the problems that we perceive. So let’s harness the power of our good ideas and drive on.” Ivan Axelrod, chairman of District 3, was re-elected chairman of the USTA, topping District 4 chairman Gabe Wand by a vote of 30-24. Don Marean, District 9 chairman, was elected vice chairman. He received 30 votes, defeating District 2 membership director Steve Oldford (19 votes), and District 6 chairman Alan Leavitt (4 votes). One director abstained. Sally Stauffer, USTA executive secretary, was voted secretary of the USTA. She ran unopposed, replacing Barbara Brooks, who retired from the USTA after 62 years of service and 22 years serving as secretary. Dick Brandt, a membership director from District 1, was voted treasurer of the USTA, also running unopposed. A protest was filed by District 8 director Jason Settlemoir regarding the seating of John Matarazzo of Saratoga as a track director in District 8. Matarazzo was voted a new track director for District 8 by the directors of that district, defeating Shawn Wiles of Monticello Raceway; however, Settlemoir cited Article 5, Section 1 of the USTA bylaws, which states that “all directors must be individual members of this association and must maintain that membership throughout the term of office.” He was refuted by Joe Faraldo of District 8A, who cited Article 5, Section 1, Subsection A, that states that “The full board of directors shall be the sole judge of the election and qualification of its members.” After a paper ballot of the 53 directors in attendance at that time, Matarazzo’s eligibility as director was approved by a vote of 45-6 (Matarazzo and Shawn Wiles abstained). The USTA added six new directors this year. District 2 sat Mike Carlo of Northville Downs as track director, replacing the late Ken Marshall; and membership director Sam Hedington, who replaced Jerry Landess. District 5 sat track director Jim Miller of Hawthorne Racecourse, who replaced Phil Langley, who stepped down as track director and USTA president (and received a standing ovation after his contributions to the industry were recognized by Axelrod). District 6 sat track director Joe Frasure Jr. of Pompano Park, who replaced Brett Revington. District 8 sat Matarazzo who replaced Wiles as mentioned previously. District 11 sat track director John Hensley Jr. of Dover Downs, who replaced Jim Boese of Harrington Raceway. The Meadowlands Racetrack asked the USTA to facilitate a survey of its members asking this question: “Are you in favor of dedicating 5 percent of the approximately $500 million in annual slots subsidies to fund a major marketing effort for a three-year trial period?” The directors voted to not pursue this survey by a vote of 7 “yes” to 47 “no.” The USTA invited four guest speakers who addressed the board: Dan Gall, president and CEO of Standardbred Canada; Tom Luchento, president of Harness Horsemen International (HHI); Ed Martin, president of the Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI); and Julie Broadway, president of the American Horse Council. The USTA and HHI hosted a joint panel discussion about out-of-competition testing and uniformity of medication and licensing rules. Appearing on the panel were Dionne Benson DVM, executive director of the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium; Clara Fenger DVM of the North American Association of Racetrack Veterinarians; Alan Foreman, chairman and CEO of the Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association; Martin of ARCI; and moderator Sal DiMario, executive director of the Delaware Standardbred Owners Association. To view exclusive USTA video coverage of today's general session, click on the link at the top of this page. For full video coverage of today's meetings, click here. The board of directors annual meeting will continue through Tuesday (Feb. 28). Tuesday’s meeting includes the Racing Committee (combining the Driver/Trainer, Fairs, Pari-Mutuel, and Regulatory committees); Finance Committee; Rules Committee; and second general session, including the new president’s address, remarks by Executive Vice President and CEO Mike Tanner, and approval of the 2017 USTA budget.   USTA Communications Department 

Some exceptionally-bred Victorian youngsters will contest Friday night’s harness racing Sapling Stake. Four of the two-year-olds - all Australian Pacing Gold purchases – are related to a host of Group One winners such as Elsu, Blatant Lie, Keppel Bay, Mother Courage, Mr Nickel, Jilliby Jitterbug, Fly Like An Eagle, Mach Doro, Chokin, Changeover, Copper Beach and Tandias Courage! But family reputations will count for nothing in the 1609-metre feature, where debutante stablemates Beltane and Higherthananeagle have fared best in barriers one and two. Prepared by last weekend’s Miracle Mile winning trainer David Aiken, the duo is expected to play a strong role in the finish. “I’m very happy with both of them,” Aiken said. “They both have their share of ability and should win a few races along the way. “At this stage I am leaning more towards Higherthananeagle, which could prove to be one out of the box.” Given Higherthananeagle’s trial at Shepparton last week, it is easy to understand why Aiken has a soft spot for the colt. Never fully extended, Higherthananeagle rated 1:56.8 over 1690 metres with Mark Pitt in the sulky. By Mach Three from Three Eagles, the freshman is a brother to Fly Like An Eagle and Mach Doro. “Beltane went well in his trial when second, and has improved in his work since, but Higherthananeagle was very impressive,” Aiken said. Beltane and Higherthananeagle are owned by Kevin Riseley and his son Martin, with the pair also the proud owners of Lennytheshark. Trained by talented horseman Matthew Craven, Ourbeachsomewhere will come out of gate three in his debut appearance, while Micrometeor, a winner at Swan Hill a fortnight ago - will start from five for Kerryn Manning. By Somebeachsomewhere, Ourbeachsomewhere is from multiple Group One winner Mother Courage, while Micrometeor – a son of Art Major - is from the same family as Australian Pacing Gold Final winners Blatant Lie, Keppel Bay and Mr Nickel. APG Media

Pompano Beach, FL...February 27, 2017...Prairie Fortune, driven by John MacDonald, took top harness racing honors in Pompano Park's $12,000 Open 1 Trot on Monday night (February 27), scoring a handy win in 1:53.3, just one tick off of his lifetime best performance.   The Florida bred 5 year-old gelded son of Arapa Victory pinned a 1½ length defeat on the late charging Massacaia, handled by Tom Jackson, with Explosive Muscles, with Dave Ingraham in the bike and in the garden spot much of the way, next, just a neck further back.   The pacesetting Diamond Dagger finished fourth after cutting fractions of :28, :56.3 and 1:24.4.   Prairie Fortune was away in good order mid-pack and pulled mid-way around turn two to begin chewing away at the leader. On the backside, Prairie Fortune ducked back in before tilting out again heading into the final turn.   As the field straightened away, Prairie Fortune muscled his way past the leader and easily held off the two most serious pursuers to score the handy win.   Commenting after the race, driver John MacDonald lamented, "He sure is a nice horse. He can grind away forever.   "Tonight, I took him out going to the half but ducked back in on the backstretch when Jason's mare (Diamond Dagger) seemed to have some steam left.   "I was pretty confident once we moved on even terms turning for home and he was strong to the line."   In getting his initial win of the season in just two starts, Prairie Fortune won for the 28th time in his 52nd career start, sending his lifetime earnings $210,545 for Laurie Poulin, who co-owns with trainer Mike Deters.   As the even money choice on the tote-board, Prairie Fortune returned $4.20 to his multitude of followers.   The $10,000 Open 2 Trot went to Celebrity Maserati, under the guidance of Marcello Spano, in 1:54.2.   This seven year-old son of Andover Hall, making only his 30th lifetime start, went a brave first over journey on the backside and proved the best by a length over Kabu, driven by Tom Jackson.   Southwind Stryker, handled by Wally Hennessey, finished third, this after a miscue leaving and spotting the field several lengths.   Pocket Trip was fourth while Stache picked up the nickel. Gold Savage completed the order of finish after sawing through panels of :27.4, :56.3 and 1:25.2.   The clocking was the fastest for the winner since a 1:53 win at Pocono Downs as a 2013 three year-old, the year he won $138,402 and claimed the crown in the prestigious Dexter Cup.   Celebrity Maserati pushed his seasonal scorecard to 2-2-0 in four starts to send his 2017 earnings to $12,375. Lifetime, he's banked $174,032.   As the 2 to 1 second choice, Celebrity Maserati returned $6.40 to win.   Racing continues on Tuesday night with a septet of trotting mares in action in the feature.   Modern Mercury has been installed as the 8 to 5 morning line favorite and trainer Rob Harmon has hired George Napolitano, Jr. to take the lines back of this four year-old daughter of Donato Hanover.   Total Freedom, She's All In, Celebrity Artemis, M T Ur Pockets, Serendipitious and Bad Angel complete the talented field.   In the "better for the bettor" department, Pompano Park's Super Hi-5 finale carryover has ballooned to $21,509 for Tuesday night's card. There also a $10,000 guaranteed pool for the Pick-4, contested on races six through nine.   Post time is set for 7:20 p.m.   by John Berry for Pompano Park

LEBANON, OH. – My Hare Lady lead a cavalry charge through the wire to capture the $15,000 championship final of a three-week harness racing “Survivor Series” for $5000 claiming mares on Monday afternoon at Miami Valley Raceway.  The 8-year-old Jereme’s Jet lass held on by a nose over Certitude (Brady Galliers), with show finisher Endeavors Ladyluck (Jeremy Smith) and a host of others all within a couple lengths at the end of the 1:55.3 mile. The ‘Brew Crew’, trainer Jeff Brewer and his son driver Jason Brewer, condition the horse for owner Chris Choros.  After winning a division of the first eliminations, My Hare Lady was second by a length in the second round to advance to the lucrative final.  Sent off at 9/2 odds, the winner returned $11.60 for a $2 ducat in the final. In the program nightcap, longshots Absolute Purity (Kayne Kauffman) and Thunder Noise (Jeff McNabb) combined for a record exacta payoff.  With Absolute Purity going off at 64-1 and paying $131.80 to win, and runnerup Thunder Noise going off at 42-1, the exacta payoff of $7020.20 was the highest in the four-year history of Miami Valley. Gregg Keidel  

WASHINGTON, PA, Feb. 27, 2017 -- An unruly Rockin Rum Springa was wide in the turns -- and not much more manageable in the straighaways -- but still was much the best in Monday's harness racing feature at The Meadows, a $13,000 conditioned pace for fillies and mares. Rockin Rum Springa nearly blew the first turn while trying for the lead before Dave Palone was able to wrestle her back to the cones. The 4-year-old daughter of Rockin Image-Deferred Comp finally settled down at the three-quarters and scored in 1:54 over a "good" surface. Classic Carpet was second, 1-1/4 lengths back, with Seeyouatthefinish third. Ron Burke trains Rockin Rum Springa, who notched her second straight victory and extended her career bankroll to $176.611, for Burke Racing Stable and Weaver Bruscemi LLC. Jim Pantaleano piloted four winners on the 12-race card, lifting his career total to 6,995. The Meadows Racetrack & Casino

February 25, 2017 - The even-money favorite Sultana Jet (6f Igor Font-Art Deco-Diamond Way) held bravely for a length victory in Saturday’s harness racing featured Wind Scot DIJ (purse 600,000Huf, 1800 meters autostart) at Kincsem Park. Co-owner Gyorgy Horvath was again the pilot for trainer Imre Fazekas and Pimri Bt., the other co-owner. The quick stepping mare (shown below) has won two straight in as many 2017 appearances and has a 4-1-0 slate in five starts since import. Toniatti Giacometti SS SAgricola bred this mare. 6.8/1 Bimbo de Chenu (5f Scipion du Goutier-Ovive de Chenu-Casino des Sports) was second for Tibor Hajnal, also trainer. 9.5/1 Nacho Nico (10g Belami-Icecandy Star-Endless Sands) was third for Emese Vezer. Race time was 1.17.1kr. The undercard included the 400,000Huf Buvesz DIJ (distance 1900 meters autostart) and 1.4/1 Tiara Boss (5f Wall Street Banker-Peace Force Pro-Kosar) scored in 1.19kr for Zoltan Ozvar, also trainer, and owner Arizona doo of Serbia. She scored for the second time in five 2017 starts. The Cedrus DIJ (purse 360,000Huf, 1960 meters voltstart) went to 7.1/1 Bonjour Evo (4f Donato Hanover-Real Live Woman-Angus Hall) timed in 1.22.5kr for trainer/driver Sandor Varga and owner Antioch Arani SRO (CZE). This win was her first since import for Finland. The Nyakas Handicap (purse 360,000Huf, 1800 meters autostart) went to 1.18.6kr timed and 2.1/1 Passion Grif (8g Varenne-Sex Appeal OK-Lanson) with trainer Laszlo Kolozsi at the lines. Finally, the Nyeretlenek Versenye (purse 360,000, 1900 meters autostart) went to 5.4/1 Villeneuve (3m Pilgrims Taj-Brisco Emma-Brisco Robertto) for driver Zoltan Gyolai (amateur), owner Gyolai Racing, and trainer Laszlo Kolozsi. Race time was 1.21.3kr. Quality trotting continues every weekend at the beautiful Kincsem Park facility. Visit their new website www.nlkfu.hu. Thomas H. Hicks

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Freehold, NJ --- Judy Magie gets emotional when she talks about Smoke Pan Mirrors. The 10-year-old harness racing female pacer might not be a household name around the nation, but she is a beloved member of the Magie family’s home in central New Jersey. Purchased as a yearling for $5,500 by Judy and her husband, trainer Brian Magie Jr., at the 2008 Standardbred Horse Sale, Smoke Pan Mirrors has won 39 of 271 career races and earned $409,108 in purses. She’s done it the hard way, never winning a race worth more than $20,000 and never competing in a claiming race. She has never won more than $72,202 in a season, or less than $33,348, and averaged nearly 40 starts a year since turning age 6. And she just keeps going. On Thursday night, Smoke Pan Mirrors competes in a conditioned race at the Meadowlands, where she is 9-1 on the morning line with Brett Miller in the sulky. Her race leads the one-hour “Meadowlands Harness Live” broadcast beginning at 9:30 p.m. on SNY. “When we bought her at the sale that day, never would I have imagined what she’s been to my family,” Judy said. “You can always count on her to take care of us. It’s a blessing. It’s a huge blessing. She’s really been a gift from God. We love her. We just treat her like family, because she is. She’s just been so good to us.” Smoke Pan Mirrors is a daughter of stallion No Pan Intended out of the broodmare Sleight Of Pan. She was Sleight Of Pan’s sixth foal, but first by 2003 Horse of the Year No Pan Intended. “We noticed a lot of times that mares bred to No Pan Intended would come to life, so to speak,” Brian said. “We were going mostly on conformation, and she was gorgeous. The fact the mare had a few foals, and this was the first No Pan Intended, we liked that combination. We were thrilled to get her. We loved her.” Smoke Pan Mirrors raced on the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes circuit at age 2, finishing second to future multiple-stakes-winner Dancinwiththestarz in her series debut. She also finished second in a division of the Arden Downs that season. At 3, she won twice in the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes Stallion Series. Two years later, she posted one of her biggest victories, winning the Fillies & Mares Open at Tioga Downs. She might be one of the hardest-working women in harness racing. Smoke Pan Mirrors has started at least one race in 84 of the past 85 months, including the most recent 21 in a row. And if you’re a driver, there’s a good chance you’ve sat behind her. A total of 53 different drivers have been in the sulky for her races. “She’s been so durable and enjoys her job, so it’s kind of hard to shut her down,” Brian said. “In this day and age, with the hard racetracks and the style of racing, you don’t find this durability just anywhere. I think it’s just a tribute to her conformation; she was put together the way you want a horse to be put together. The drivers all love her. Nobody says she’s a Cadillac anymore, but she always has been. “We just hope that someday she passes those traits off to her offspring. We’re looking forward to the day when we can train one of her babies. I think in my heart that she will be a good broodmare.” Smoke Pan Mirrors resides in a stall at the end of a row nearest the stable’s office. In the stall next to her is 9-year-old stallion Voice Of Truth, himself a $456,177-earner in his career, bred by Judy Magie and Pine Creek Stables. “They’re like an old married couple,” Judy said. “They’re just as happy as can be.” Keeping Smoke Pan Mirrors happy is one of the keys to her longevity on the racetrack. She has a routine -- first out to the field in the morning and then last to jog or train, followed immediately by lunch. “She’s a bit of a diva,” Judy said, laughing, “But she’s just a really fun horse.” “She’s set in her ways, just like most women,” Brian said, also laughing. “But she’s a sweetheart. My 1-year-old son (Luke) could walk in there and she wouldn’t hurt him. She’s good to be around. She’s a pleasure. She doesn’t owe us anything. We have great respect for her and what she’s done over the years. We’re always trying to think about what’s best for her.” When the time comes for Smoke Pan Mirrors to retire from racing and focus on motherhood, she will do it right at home. “She’ll get to spend the rest of her life as a broodmare at our house. We still have Voice Of Truth’s mother (Shandelle Hanover). They bought our farm, so they’ll get to live out their days there. “I’m happy to be able to do that for her.”  by Ken Weingartner, Harness Racing Communications 
Cal Expo harness racing driver Mooney Svendsen is currently piloting the leaders of both the 3 and 4-year-old Sire Stakes male pacing divisions in Allmyx'sliventexas and Army Of One. Both are homebred sons of Hi Ho Silverheel's who compete for Wayne and Rod Knittel and take their lessons from Bob Johnson. Allmyx'sliventexas is coming off one of the most sizzling races of the meeting, winning the first stakes of the season for his division by 11 lengths in a sparkling 1:51 4/5 front-end performance. "Bob and I felt he was sitting on a big race, because he'd been racing from off the pace and coming an amazing last three-quarters," Svendsen explained. "Even that with, I was surprised at the mile he went. "Usually when I let him roll he relaxes perfectly and I can drive him with two fingers, but that night he was like a rocket. He grabbed that bit and I did all I could just to hold on. He was unbelievable." Army Of One has accounted for both of the Sire Stakes for the 3-year-old colts, scoring an easy victory in the first and then just holding on by a head in the most recent big-money clash last week after carving out all the fractions. "He's got a lot of potential, and might turn to be as good as Allmyx'sliventexas," Mooney related. "He's only had five races and his problem is he's still pretty green. Featured Trot brings out well-matched field A conditioned Trot headed by Kickinitwithkohler, Big Baller and Lodi Dorian Blues gets the marquee treatment on Friday night at Cal Expo. First post for the Watch and Wager LLC program is 6:15 p.m. The main event will go as the sixth race, and there will also be a non-betting California Sire Stakes for the 4-year-old trotters to be decided prior to the regular card. Kickinwithkohler is a 5-year-old daughter of Southwind Breeze and the Go Get Lost mare Shove-off who races for Tonight's The Knight, is trained by Kennedy Lindsey and will have the services of James Kennedy. The hard-knocking mare rattled off back-to-back conditioned victories on February 10 and 18, using a strong closing kick to get the job done, then stepped up to the Open for last week's assignment. While not match for heavily-favored Silverlode and runner-up My Little Susie, Kickinitwithkohler did put in a solid rally for the show money that night and looms a major player in Friday's line-up. Big Baller is a 10-year-old son of Panama Hanover who goes about his business for the partnership of Siegel, Robinson, Thronson and Reider with George Reider the conditioner and David Sigel at the controls. Big Baller recorded his most recent tally on January 14, parlaying a pocket trip into a length and three-quarters decision. He subsequently finished fourth in the Gary Budahn Final and fifth in last week's Open and should appreciate the class relief for this assignment. By Mark Ratzky, publicity - Cal Expo Harness    
The Meadows Standardbred Owners Association has scheduled a General Membership Meeting for Thursday, March 9.   The meeting will begin at 6PM in Delvin's Banquet Room on the Racebook level of The Meadows Racetrack & Casino.   All members are encouraged to attend.
The Illinois Racing Board Feb. 28 conditionally approved transferring $500,000 of its "surplus" operating funds to bolster purses at the state's three remaining tracks. The tracks agreed to the details of the transfer. Horsemen's groups, however, raised some concerns and said they need more information before they decide whether to support enabling legislation. The ensuing lengthy discussion prompted IRB chairman Jeffrey Brincat to reiterate, "I never thought it would be so hard to give away a half-a-million dollars."   The proposal, eventually approved on a vote of 8-1, would provide $259,662 for the purse account at Arlington International Racecourse, $120,406 for Hawthorne Race Course, $37,475 for downstate Fairmount Park and $120,406 for harness purses at Hawthorne.   "Anything we can do to increase purses, we're all for it," said Hawthorne president Tim Carey. Hawthorne eliminated its stakes schedule in 2016 to maintain overnight purse levels.   "Fairmount purses are at the poverty level," said that track's president, Brian Zander. "Any little amount is appreciated."   Arlington general manager Tony Petrillo noted Arlington trimmed $500,000 from this year's stakes schedule to reallocate money to the overnight purse structure. "You have our full support," he said.   Board staff said the money is surplus from the appropriation for the current fiscal year because of economies and a reduced need for regulation due to a dramatic decline in harness race dates after the demise of Balmoral and Maywood Park.   Representatives of the Illinois Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association and the Illinois Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Foundation both said they support the idea of hiking purses. But they urged the money be used to fund races written for Illinois-bred horses, which carry awards for owners and breeders.   And the ITHA, echoing sentiments expressed by the harness horsemen's group, said its members need further assurance that the redistribution of IRB funds will not result in a demand for more detailed scrutiny of their internal finances.   Dan Sullivan, outgoing president of the IBTOF, said breeding numbers in Illinois have declined precipitously, threatening the availability of horses in the near future.   "If we don't keep the numbers up," Sullivan told the commissioners, "you won't have a job to do in another three or four years, maximum."   ITHA president Mike Campbell added, "The reality of it is that we've got to enhance the Illinois product."   Sullivan and Campbell argued the state's tracks are not meeting their legal obligation to card two Illinois-bred races per program, which led to a protracted debate over the difficulty of matching horses to fields in conditions likely to fill.   "The statute says we're entitled to two races a day and here's the funding to support that," Sullivan said.   The ITHA and harness horsemen again raised fears that switching funding from the IRB operating account to horsemen's purses might open their organization to demands for internal records. Board staff said there is no intent to do that and nothing in the proposal that would trigger expanded oversight.   The lone "no" vote was cast by commissioner Robert Schiewe Jr., who questioned the legality of the transfer and the allocation among the tracks. His motion to table the discussion until the March meeting failed on a vote of 2-7.   The funds transfer is contingent on approval of legislation changing the purpose of the IRB appropriation from "regulation" of racing to "regulation and promotion" of racing. IRB staff said "promotion" would cover using operating funds for purses, which would promote the popularity of the state's product and generate more handle.   The legislation is awaiting a hearing in the Senate Appropriations Committee. By Bob Kieckhefer Reprinted with permission of The Bloodhorse
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