Day At The Track
Alan Playford Galloway

Obituary - Alan Playford Galloway

Alan Playford Galloway, the man who founded Australia’s most successful ever harness racing stud farm Alabar, was buried this past week shortly before his 92nd birthday – what they left behind were many memories of a versatile and colourful horseman, a leading Aussie Rules footballer in his day, a highly respected mounted policeman, later excelling in yachting, kayaking, flying his own plane, driving fast cars, and becoming a highly successful businessman through sheer hard work and a bright and active mind. Born on March 15, 1928, his father Faulkner Galloway became General Manager of the State Bank of Australia in South Australia with the son growing up to be extremely close to his Uncle Tom (Sir Thomas Playford), the longest serving Commonwealth State Premier in Australian history, 27 years in total. Following in his father’s footsteps at the bank was never an.option. From the time he first went to Wakerie High School (up by the Murray River) Alan knew he preferred later taking up farming. His father Faulkner was then spending some years at Waikerie as the local bank manager on his way to the very top. When Alan ended his days at the local high school, he soon after began attending Roseworthy Agricultural College, some 90 miles from where he lived. There was no direct means of travelling between Roseworthy and Waikerie. This hiccup was overcome by the teenager often keeping his horse Ned at the college to enable him to ride all that way back home when required.  . Ned was not a retired trotter or pacer. He proudly wore the X70 brand of the noted Kidman’s having been bred at their Macumba Station. A horse with the toughness and talent of Ned was one hell-of-a-way to learn about horses at an early age. Alan was going on for 19 when Aussie Rules football derailed his days at the college. North Adelaide, in the SANFL, had heard glowing reports about this high flying star in country football it was said would ‘walk’ into any team in Adelaide, and a recruiting officer arrived in town with promises of what he could expect if he signed up with the Roosters, the colourful name North wore with pride. In next to no time, this six-foot plus firebrand was the key to the senior’s backline, playing a tough brand of footy that had the Adelaide media constantly naming him: ‘The iron man of football’, despite him earning several broken bones in his first couple of seasons. When those rugged games of interstate matches between South Australia and Victoria were held in those days, he was one of the first selected. Among the Vic’s team in the early 1950’s were such forwards as Brownlow medallists Ron ‘Smokey’ Clegg (Sth Melbourne) and Fred Flanagan (Geelong). When North Adelaide won the 1952 premiership, the club’s official program for that day provided pen pictures of their leading players. Written beneath a picture of Alan Galloway were the words: Alan Galloway is a hard-hitting and tenacious defender when heading up the team’s backline. No Adelaide or Melbourne footballer then made much money out of the game like they do today. This meant they all had a second job. Alan wanted to be close to horses, so on moving to Adelaide to live, he became a member of the South Australian Mounted Police. He never minded the big nights at Wayville trots being one of the two who usually attended to help keep the thousands who turned up.  He also helped break-in new greys to become part of the police squad. Being a tall and good looking sportsman, Alan was looked on as a good catch by a number of female supporters of the Roosters. The one who finally did the catching was an attractive hairdresser named Barbara Day. When finally popping the question to her, it was not such a case of her marrying a champion sportsman, as Barbara actually hailed from a well known pioneering family of Adelaide that in the mid-1800’s owned much of the land in the new suburb of North Adelaide. The Day’s have roads and other milestones named after them in Adelaide today. Surprisingly, it was on the Day’s side of the family that the first member of the two families became involved in harness racing. This was Barbara’s father, a farmer out at Bolivar, who with his brother Len opened a stud farm with two sires about the time World War 2 came to an end.  It was a business deal to try and boost the numbers with the war having left a shortage of young horses, but his sires left much to be desired. A recent photo of Alan and Barbara Galloway The couple would have three children – two daughters Julie and Greer, and an only son named Alan Thomas Galloway. All three were great around the home and the farm, as Alan had worked hard to develop a dairy farm, building it to having upwards of a hundred cows. He added to this work a delivery round, calling on dozens and dozens of householders around Mt Barker, with Alan usually driving the vehicle with two of his kids filling up milk for the householders.    Of the many bad injuries he suffered playing football, none were as serious as what occurred early in 1955 to his back. It required neurosurgery, a delicate operation then in its infancy working on the spine. Even today it remains a last option, as in stapling of the spine usually has the patient losing two or three inches in height.. His football days were virtually over. A second such operation would follow 25 years later, with Alan’s height then becoming less than six feet. His first standardbred was Barker Boy, a horse that won numerous races. Several years later he purchased the broodmare Grand Potts, a half-sister of Ketchil, that would produce the outstanding Sheffield Globe. He was on the right track, as when he bred Grand Potts to Aachen, it produced a handsome colt that Alan broke in himself.and knew it was very good. When thinking of a name, they agreed to name it after their property they had recently thought up. This came to be by using the first three letters of Alan, then joining this to the first three letters of Barbara, which gave them  ALABAR.  They decide  to use this as part of the colt’s name – Bold Alabar.  It became an outstanding young pacer winning many races before they accepted a big offer from owner Bert Whirburn, the best pacer top Melbourne reinsman Neville Gath said he ever drove. Three generations of Galloways - Alan senior, Alan Junior and young Thomas all on on bikes in Thailand Alabar first became a stud farm as part of their dairy farm when securing the colonial-bred Stepping Chief to stand there. This pacer at one stage had won 16 races in a row. It stood just the one season for them as during that first year, Alan had a visitor to the farm in Kiwi Noel Simpson who was buying stallions in North America for not much money, then either selling them or leasing them to Australian stud farms. Alabar decided to give Simpson’s imports a go, and the next season they stood Leopard Hanover (Torpid) and Trainer Hanover (Tar Heel).  Both were good enough to have several breeders from Victoria crossing the border to use these sires.  It was the next stallion Simpson sent him that hit the jackpot.  This was Golden Adios, the very first son of Adios to come to Australia. It was a real winner with our mares. Among the winners Alan bred was Sovereign Adios that he sold to owners at Bendigo where this horse later sired the mighty Popular Alm. When a property came up for sale at Nairne in the second year of the horse breeding at the dairy farm, they drove the eight miles over to Nairne to look at it, finding this to be far more suitable for horse breeding than where they were at Mt. Barker. Selling off all dairy cows, sheds and the house and property,  they moved across to Nairne where breeding standardbreds had Alabar Farm up running with several sires, all from North America.    When Alan Jnr wanted to go overseas to see how stud farms in North America and France operated when he was 18, he spent most of Australia’s cold winter months overseas, returning to South Australia having learned a great deal when away. His father was so pleased to greet him on return that he went in partnership with the boy with the first Porsche 930 Turbo to be imported to Australia. Many years later Alan Thomas Galloway would return the complement to his father when Alan was to celebrate his 89th birthday. Flying in to Sydney from Thailand where he had been living for 12 years, the son collected a $200,000 Mercedes Sports as his gift to his father. That day Alan Snr again displayed his sense of humour when he had the car’s exhaust blow out all the candles on the cake. The many trophies gain by Alabar bred horses over the years. Only recently the father and son agreed they would buy a horse at the February yearling sales they would race together for the first time. But the usually good health of his father took a turn, with doctors later stating how his heart had simply given up. Max Agnew, the Victorian author of numerous books on harness racing, has almost ready for release a book on the two Alan Galloways with many colourful stories about ALABAR and the breeders who support them. It runs to more than 500 pages, so look for it in May.  

Club Menangle

It's as easy as APG at Club Menangle

Club Menangle has confirmed industry rumours of a further commitment to the harness racing industry in New South Wales. Australian Pacing Gold (APG) has announced that Harness Racing Victoria will contribute an additional $25,000 towards the two-year old fillies and two-year old colts and geldings Gold Bullion Finals to be held in Victoria in 2021. The bonus will be paid to the owner/s of the highest placed Victorian bred horse in either final and sold out of the 2020 APG sales. The horse must be sold through the sale and potential buyers should note the conditions. “Club Menangle Directors have been monitoring the horrendous impact of the drought across New South Wales for the past eighteen months”, said Club Menangle’s Chair, Robert Marshall. The record dry has had an enormous impact on the harness racing industry in this state and made worse by the unprecedent bushfires which have ravaged parts of New South Wales since just before Christmas. While it may be too late for Santa Claus, Robert and his fellow Club Menangle director on the Board of APG, Bill Ellis worked with HRV APG directors to develop an additional incentive for the forthcoming Melbourne and Sydney APG sales. Bill Ellis said the Club Menangle Board was committed to implementing an incentive ahead of the sales, given the conditions prevailing in NSW. Owners of horses purchased through APG’s Sydney sale and bred in NSW (inseminated, foaled and branded) will be eligible to compete for the Sydney bonus of $25,000 in both two-year old Finals.  Robert Marshall noted the important characteristic of the bonus was that it would not necessarily go to the winner of the Sydney Gold Bullion Final. If the winner was not bred in NSW and not sold at the Sydney APG sale, the bonus would go to the next highest placed NSW bred horse. The news has been welcomed by the New South Wales harness racing industry. Success Stud co-proprietor, Jackie Gibson thanked Club Menangle for supporting the breeding industry in New South Wales and highlighted the value in purchasing a yearling through the Sydney APG sale. It makes sense to purchase in New South Wales due to the support Club Menangle provides. Rod Woodhouse, the owner of Yirribee Stud, said “this is another example of Club Menangle’s leadership in New South Wales. On the eve of the Sky Carnival of Miracles, its another reason to breed and own in NSW.” Club Menangle also funds the NSW Blue Series. Another Club Menangle funding initiative. All in all, it’s as easy as APG! Club Menangle

Pullover Brown

Dina Brown delivering on promise

Somewhere in Tony Herlihy’s harness racing stable there’s a calendar with a big red circle around the months of December and January and the words “Dina Brown” scribbled all over it. There has to be! The daughter of Bettor’s Delight has made the summer months her own in recent weeks bringing up two wins and three minor placings in her last six starts. This strong run of form started on the 13th of December with a mile-distance second to The Paua Diver at Alexandra Park and was quickly followed by a gallant second to Fabrizio when gearing up to celebrate the end of the year on the 31st of December. Her form obviously wasn’t effected by any 2020 celebratory hangover with a comfortable win accomplished at Cambridge on the 5th of January when driven by junior driver Taitlyn Hanara.    Her latest trip into the birdcage for photos being an emphatic four length romp at Alexandra Park on the 24th of January when setting a sound pace and running away from race rivals at the top of the straight. The overall time of 2.41.4 over the 2200m mobile completed without the use of the persuader. This run of consistent winning form mimics an initial 3yr old campaign which saw Dina Brown win or place in three from her four starts over the same December-January period. While the mare does seem to have penchant for sun-god worship it’s also worth remembering that she’s been able to foot it in all conditions with a third placing in the 3yo Diamond at last seasons Harness Jewels behind none other than Princess Tiffany and race winner Belle Of Montana. The performance, albeit aided by the inside draw, came on an easy Addington track that had been the victim of heavy rains the night before. The recent race record of Dina Brown is starting to deliver on a strong family tradition, that of winning. Her dam Pullover Brown (121 wins, $333,000) left fields in her wake during the early 2000’s with notable victories coming in the form of an NZ Oaks title alongside a truly successful Australian campaign that included wins in the Victorian Oaks, Australian Oaks (5 length winner over the Maurice Mckendry driven Classical) and a Breeders Crown 3yr old Fillies Final title captured at Bendigo. Pullover Brown, herself a full sister to the sub-1.50 pacer Montecito, has also been able to add a well coiled broodmare-string to her bow leaving serial Australian winner In Runaway Bay (39 wins, $279’000) and Dina Bolt, who placed in the Group 2 2yo Classic behind Virgil at Invercargill in April of last year and currently has two wins from just eight race-day starts.   The next “Pullover-production” is due to to be offered at the 2020 National Standardbred Yearling Sale at Karaka on the 16th of February. Coming out of the Breckon Farms draft Lot 19, a son of American Ideal, carries the name American Conqueror and will no doubt have his fair share of ability. Lot 19 - American Conqueror His favourite time of year is yet to be determined…           Ben McMillan

Winning reinsman Damian Wilson and trainer David Farrar,Harness racing

"Bolter" provides first group race success

Shepparton trainer David Farrar was a little surprised when huge odds of 60/1 were served up for his pacer The Kew Legend at one of Leeton Harness Racing Club's feature meetings of the season recently. Farrar qualified the Bettors Delight-sired two-year-old for the $30,600 Group Three Southern Central Engineering Breeders Plate Final last Friday night and believed he wasn't without some chance. "We didn't have a great deal of luck a fortnight earlier in a qualifying heat-we were out the back; there was a bit of interference and it was a stinking hot day," he said. "The temperature was in the mid-40s and all-in-all, it wasn't ideal for a youngster making his debut. He did get dehydrated and then we couldn't get him to pee before the race." The Kew Legend ran fifth to grab a spot in the big final, but Farrar said that very first trip did his horse "the world of good" in the end. "It was an experience and he was better for it come the final. When Damo (driver Damian Wilson) was able to get the lead, I was very happy. The horse is a relaxed customer and has always shown a good attitude," Farrar said. "Thankfully he dug deep over the final stages when another horse loomed up beside him. We just got there by a half neck, but it was great." Farrar has captured some nice races in his career, including a Country Championship years ago at Moonee Valley, but group success has eluded him - until Friday night. "I've competed in the Leeton event five times previously. I've gone up with a few horses owned by Noel Tyndall, from Nathalia, but the closest we ever got was fourth," he said. "It was an excellent drive by Damo. He's a good driver, very under-rated in my opinion. "While I've known him for a long time, I've only been using him for the past two years. He always comes to the trials for me-and it was at a trials night he convinced me the horse was worth a shot at Leeton." Farrar started training when he was 18 years old, but took a break five years later. "When the kids were growing up I decided to give the horses away. I was out for about 17 years, but now I've been back at it for the last 32 years, so it has been a long association," he said. "It has sort of been like a big wheel. You just have to keep working at it and you will get rewarded for your efforts." Farrar, who has been enjoying a great deal of success this season with his team, said The Kew Legend was now raced by the estate of former top sportsman Jack Carr. Jack, who died a few months ago, played senior football for West Torrens in SA, and also represented the State in Shield cricket. He played with Sir Garfield (Garry) Sobers, considered cricket's greatest all-rounders, and won the Sir Donald Bradman medal on one occasion. He was also pretty handy with the golf clubs! "I was lucky to have had horses with Jack over the last 17 years and I think there was only one that didn't win a race for us," Farrar said. "The Kew Legend will have a quiet time for a bit before tackling the Bathurst Gold Crown heats and final in late March," he said. "I've visited Bathurst previously, but we've never raced up there, so we're looking forward to it."   Terry Gange NewsAlert PR Mildura

Harness racing fans and industry participants across the country are getting behind a crowdfunding campaign to help with the cost of an expensive new treatment regime for champion trainer-driver Gavin Lang. Lang was diagnosed in September with a rare form of Lymphoma, and has been undergoing treatment at Melbourne's Epworth hospital. A recipient of the Distinguished National Service Medal and a Victorian Hall of Famer, Lang is also a legend of the prestigious Victorian Caduceaus Club, which this week established the GoFundMe campaign, with a goal of reaching $100,000. Within 48 hours the GoFundMe site received contributions of up to $27000 from more than 70 people. Lang has an extremely rare form of Lymphoma (only one in every 100 Lymphoma patients is diagnosed with this type) and has already undergone several months of intensive chemotherapy. The campaign site reports Lang's medical team has now recommended an intensive three-month program of therapy with a new drug, available only in the USA. "Gavin has given us so much joy over the years as well as being a fantastic ambassador to our great sport," the GoFundMe page said. "The Harness Racing industry is often referred to as a big family and families support each other when things turn tough. Well, now is the time. We need to support Gavin and Meagan in their time of need," it said. "This is our way of showing our love and support, as well as our gratitude for what this humble man has given to our wonderful sport, so we hope you will all get behind this cause and donate generously so we can make a difference." Considered by many as Australia's best driver of the modern era, with 6300 wins to his name, Gavin Lang drove his first winner as a sixteen-year-old at Kilmore in 1975. "Group One Gav" has since been four times Australia's leading driver and leading Metro driver, and the most successful reinsman ever at Moonee Valley with 1029 winners. Make a donation to the campaign here: https://www.gofundme.com/f/group-1-gav or search for Gavin Lang at GoFundMe.   Terry Gange NewsAlert PR Mildura

The latest gavelhouse.com Standardbred auction is set to close tonight with 8 of the 28 Lots on offer on the market as of Wednesday morning. The catalogue includes a quality selection of 11 foals from Woodlands Stud as well as tried and untried racing stock and four broodmares.  Bidding is set to close, starting with Lot 1, from 7pm on Wednesday 29 January. Bidding tips Make sure you're registered and your account is set up properly well before the auction is set to close.  Each auction will auto-extend by adding extra time on if a bid is placed in the final 30 seconds. This will happen indefinitely until no further bids are placed and will also add more time onto each of the subsequent Lots.  Use auto-bids to take the stress out of the final countdown and use the refresh button to make sure your page is keeping up with the live auction. If you have any questions about the bidding process please call 09 296 4436 VIEW FULL CATALOGUE Featured Lots Lot 1 DOWNBY THESEASIDE colt Colt out of the American Ideal mare American Grace, making him closely related to Pacing Grace, Jessie's Cullen, Pacing Major, All U Need Is Faith, Linda Lovegrace, Im A Gigolo and many more. This colt is by the newest sire to the join the Woodlands Stud Stallion roster, Downbytheseaside. He is a sire with a staggering race track record – 35 starts for 22 wins and 10 placings and over $2.1 million in earnings. He took a 1.48.6 race record and was USTA 3yo of the year in 2017 over Huntsville and Fear The Dragon. He was the best of his division before retiring sound and serving two quality books of mares in 2018/19 and 2019/20.  Sire: Downbytheseaside Dam: American Grace Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE Lot 4 DOWNBY THESEASIDE filly This filly is by the newest sire to join the Woodlands Stud Stallion roster, Downbytheseaside. He is a sire with a staggering race track record for the ages – 35 starts for 22 wins and 10 placings and over $2.1 million in earnings. He took a 1.48.6 race record and was USTA 3yo of the year in 2017 over Huntsville and Fear The Dragon. He was the best of his division before retiring sound and serving two quality books of mares in 2018/19 and 2019/20.  Sire: Downbytheseaside Dam: Divine Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE Lot 6 DOWNBY THESEASIDE filly Filly out of a six-win American Ideal mare and by the newest sire to stand at Woodlands Stud, Downbytheseaside. He is a sire with a staggering race track record for the ages – 35 starts for 22 wins and 10 placings and over $2.1 million in earnings. He took a 1.48.6 race record and was USTA 3yo of the year in 2017 over Huntsville and Fear The Dragon. He was the best of his division before retiring sound and serving two quality books of mares in 2018/19 and 2019/20.  Sire: Downbytheseaside Dam: Idealistic Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE Lot 7 WHAT THE HILL filly This filly is by the newest trotting sire at Woodlands Stud, What The Hill. He is a champion son of trotting sensation Muscle Hill, out of a full-sister to Majestic Son. He earned $1.34 million in stakes and took a 1.51.4 record and was the 3YO of his year after defeating the older horses in the TVG including millionaire Crazy Wow. He has served a number of quality mares down under in the last two seasons.  Sire: What The Hill Dam: Miss Continental Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE Lot 10 DOWNBYTHE SEASIDE colt Colt out of a Bettor's Delight mare and by the newest sire to the World Class Woodlands Stud Stallion roster, Downbytheseaside. He is a sire with a staggering race track record for the ages – 35 starts for 22 wins and 10 placings and over $2.1 million in earnings. He took a 1.48.6 race record and was USTA 3yo of the year in 2017 over Huntsville and Fear The Dragon. He was the best of his division before retiring sound and serving two quality books of mares in 2018/19 and 2019/20.  Sire: Downbytheseaside Dam: Supreme Brigade Seller: Woodlands Location: Auckland VIEW ONLINE

Chase Auckland is the outright favourite for the Del-Re National A.G. Hunter Cup after the barrier draw tonight at the MCG. Punters swarmed on $3.3 and backed the Kiwi five-year-old after he draw gate four. Unlucky in the Ballarat Cup last time out when an eye-catching third to A G’s White Socks, Chase Auckland drew much better than that horse for Saturday night’s $500,000 Hunter Cup.  A G’s White Socks will have to come from gate 11. Four-year-old freak Lochinvar Art, who shocked Australasia with his blistering track-record run of 1:48.6 in the 4YO Bonanza, drew gate seven tonight, while Mach Shard (pictured, by Stuart McCormick) is a live chance from barrier two, one spot outside of Alta Orlando in gate one. Craig Demmler had no luck at the gate draw, pulling barrier 13 with My Kiwi Mate. Despite the alley, Demmler is far from conceding. “On his run the other night I was rapt. I think he was a little bit short of a run. He’s an opportunist, I’ve always said that. But I always go back to 2000 and he just reminds me so much of Breenys Fella and this guy gives me so much joy. I just hope he can help our supporters out and get home. I’m really happy with how he’s working,” Demmler said. The barrier draw was also conducted for the What The Hill Great Southern Star, with full details here.   GoodForm analyst Blake Redden breaks down the Del-Re National A.G. Hunter Cup chances runner-by-runner immediately post-barrier draw 1. Alta Orlando ($7.5 at TAB) Underrated pacer who was outstanding in the Blacks A Fake over winter. The big question is whether he can hold Mach Shard early, if he doesn’t he’ll likely end up shuffled back and playing for luck. 2. Mach Shard ($4 with TAB) Quick beginner who will hand over to an appropriate rival if he finds the pegs early. The way he is going right now he deserves to be one the second favourite. 3. King Of Swing (Emergency $10 with TAB) – X-factor horse who ripped around Menangle recently and if he gets a run he’ll make his presence felt. 4. Chase Auckland ($3.1 with TAB) Only continues to enhance his reputation after a run of the race performance in the Ballarat Cup. Is tonight the night the All Stars pull the trigger and fire him forward in search of the lead? 5. Cash N Flow ($21 with TAB) Definite question marks about this guy over a staying trip and while he does have some early toe, he may not want to use it here. 6. Triple Eight ($21 with TAB) Progressive pacer who stepped up to be competitive through the Inter Dominion. He will need plenty to go right but he might just be the best of the roughies with the right run. 7. Lochinvar Art ($8.5 with TAB) The excitement horse of the race but he’s been dealt a cruel blow at the draw. Probably looks to slide back early and get a cart in late. 8. Our Uncle Sam ($21 with TAB) This draw will either be a blessing or a curse but this will be a tough ask even if a few things go his way. 9. Code Bailey ($11 with TAB) Follows out a quick beginner. He’s still unlikely to find the front which will make it pretty difficult. 10. Bling It On ($9 with TAB) Versatile pacer who looks to be getting back to his mind-boggling Victoria Cup form from earlier in the season. If there is any chink in his rivals armory, he can expose it. 11. A Gs White Socks ($7 with TAB) Ballarat Cup winner who is by no means a one trick pony. He will drift from what was equal favouritism pre-draw but I’m expecting him to have supporters on the night. 12. San Carlo ($41 with TAB) Gets his chance to be driven ice cold in a big race which has worked for him in the past. Expect to see him driven quietly and rushing home late if there’s speed on. 13. My Kiwi Mate ($51 with TAB) Dynamic sit/sprinter at this level but he’ll need plenty of favours to win here.   HRV Trots Media - Cody Winnell

New Zealand rising superstar Oscar Bonavena opened $2.8 favourite immediately after the barrier draw tonight for the What The Hill Great Southern Star despite drawing outside of Inter Dominion champ Tornado Valley. The Mark Purdon-trained Oscar Bonavena pulled barrier four at the barrier draw, which was conducted at the MCG, with Andy Gath-trained Tornado Valley securing gate three. Purdon said Oscar Bonavena was underdone when he ran eighth first-up in Australia in last weekend's Dullard Cup. “He trained well this morning but going back to the run, when he came over, he’s got a couple of issues. We decided to do a bit of swimming and I don’t think he got enough out of it. He went into Saturday night a little bit short,” Purdon said. But this weekend will be a different story. Purdon was definitive.  “He trained great this morning and I’m sure we’ll see a fitter Oscar Bonavena this week," he said. “We’ll come out well but I don’t think you want to get into a speed duel early. He’ll cross to one off the markers and hopefully one out wide comes out with him and gives him cover, that’d be the best scenario. "But he’ll be back to full fitness by Saturday." Josh Dickie, who has picked up the drive aboard Gath-trained McLovin, said he was thrilled to be driving for such a respected trainer of trotters. “It's great to drive for Andy, I’m sure he’ll have the horse in good order and hopefully we have some luck," he said. “The first time I sat behind McLovin I was very impressed. I’d always seen him go well in Australia but sometimes it’s not until you drive them you think ‘he’s a bit better than I thought’. He gave me a lovely feel. It was a shame what happened to him at Auckland because I dare say Inter Dominion series would have been a bit different if he’d been 100 per cent." But Dickie said he had a lot of respect for Oscar Bonavena and in fact said the Kiwi was "no doubt our top trotter going forward".  “Oscar’s a special horse and with the wrap that’s been on him he’s probably been criticised a lot heavier than others would have been. He’s a four-year-old, so he’s a baby compared to the open-class trotters. From what I’ve seen and I’ve driven against him, his speed is phenomenal." Reigning Great Southern Star champ Dance Craze drew inside the back row in barrier eight, which could suit the powerful sit-sprinter, while noted on-pacer Red Hot Tooth was a big winner, snaring barrier one for trainer Kari Males.  Shortly after markets reopened following the draw Majestic Man was specked, $16 into $14.  Meanwhile, Caduceus Club MC and noted trotting form student Bill Hutchison said this line-up was possibly the "greatest trotting field" assembled in Australian history.  No driver has ever won two Great Southern Stars, but previous winners Kate Gath (who drove 2017 champion Glenferrie Typhoon) and Mark Purdon (who drove Dance Craze last year) look a good chance to break that tradition this year aboard Tornado Valley and Oscar Bonavena.  GoodForm's Blake Redden described Tornado Valley as "the best leader we've seen in the trotting ranks for many a year" and says the local is the "horse to beat". His full comments can be read below.   GoodForm analyst Blake Redden breaks down the What The Hill Great Southern Star chances runner-by-runner immediately post-barrier draw 1: Red Hot Tooth ($7 with TAB) This mare has the speed to kick through early and given she’ll likely sit on one of the favourite for the race, she’s a genuine knockout chance. 2: Massive Metro ($13 with TAB) Had an outstanding Inter Dominion in his homeland and he is pretty tough so he’s hard to discount despite the potentially tricky gate. 3: Tornado Valley ($3 with TAB) Arguably the best leader we’ve seen in the trotting ranks for many a year. He has the gate speed to lead and while he never wins by big margins, he’s the horse to beat. 4: Oscar Bonavena ($2.8 with TAB) Disappointing at his first Australian start but he has a huge boom on him. He should settle handy and clearly one of the horses to beat. 5: Sky Petite ($61 with TAB) Quality mare at her best but even with all her gate speed she’s unlikely to lead which makes it hard to see her winning. 6: Sundons Courage ($101 with TAB) This fella has come back in great form but he’s unlikely to lead from out wide which makes things tricky for him here. 7: Tough Monarch ($35 with TAB) Hard to know exactly how this bloke is going, he’s probably going to have to do work at some stage which is a tough ask in this type of race. 8: Dance Craze ($13 with TAB) The nation’s most exciting trotting mare is unlikely to be any closer than three poles in transit but if the gaps open she’ll be roaring home. 9: Margaret Ruth (EM) ($151 with TAB) Lovely mare who will enjoy the staying trip if she gets a run but this is as strong a race as she’s ever seen. 10: Majestic Man ($14 with TAB) Established himself through the New Zealand Inter Dominion series and in any other year he’d be in this up to his ears. In this edition he will need everything to go right. 11: Mclovin ($16 with TAB) Quality trotter at his best. He’ll need a few things to go his way from out the back and he’s probably stronger than he is quick which may not be suitable the way the draws have fallen. 12: Temporale ($7 with TAB) A good barrier wasn’t required for his stunning win last weekend but he will need some fortune from out here. 13: Wobelee ($31 with TAB) Total excitement machine who measured up at his first crack at this level at Ballarat. He’s out of the draw but if they run along in front he will produce a booming finish.   JASON BONNINGTON AND ADAM HAMILTON ARE JOINED BY MARK PURDON, CRAIG DEMMLER AND JOSH DICKIE: WATCH A REPLAY OF THE HUNTER CUP AND GREAT SOUTHERN STAR BARRIER DRAWS:   HRV Trots Media - Cody Winnell

Alabar Farms’ Alan Galloway has been installed as a Caduceus Club Living Legend, honouring a significant contribution to the Australasian breeding industry. Mr Galloway accepted his award via video after being unable to attend the announcement, part of the Del-Re National A. G Hunter Cup barrier draw, owing to the death of his father, Alan Snr. Mr Galloway said he was “honoured” to receive the award and dedicated it to his father. His son, Tom, and Alabar Farms’ Brett Coffey were in attendance to accept the award on his behalf. SEE BELOW A VIDEO ANNOUNCING ALAN GALLOWAY’S INDUCTION     HRV Trots Media    

Mention the name Mark Dennis to New Zealand based harness racing fans and they might vaguely remember a young Purdon / Payne trained runner with a fair bit of ability. Mention the same name to Australian followers of the game and you’ll be quickly made aware that the horse is still winning! That’s right, the now 11 year old ex-kiwi brought up his 45th win just last week at Menangle clocking an impressive 1:52.9 for the mile in the hands of Lauren Tritton.    Mark Dennis started his career in victorious style in late mid October of 2011 at Addington Raceway with a victory over the likes of All Star Man (8 subsequent wins) and the Cran Dalgety trained speed-machine Texican. His last start on New Zealand soil came just three weeks later in the Sires Stakes 3yr Old Final and saw the gelding by Bettor’s Delight produce a fighting 5th behind Texican after having to work around the field mid-race, his late charge up the passing lane peaking a little too soon to see him victorious.   The horse was almost immediately exported to Australia where he’s excelled ever since.   His racing career on the track in Australia has seen it’s fair share of highlights and close calls. A Group 3 victory in the ‘Temprid Insecticide Pace” eradicated any notion that the horse couldn’t compete for Group honors. That effort was quickly followed by a slew of group racing appearances with a 3rd in the Group 1 Cordina Sprint of 2014 behind Suave Stuey Lombo most probably representing the zenith of his career. A long stint in South Australia from 2014-2018 saw consistent results particularly around the Globe Derby track with both Mark Billinger and Ryan Hryhorec enjoying success when partnered with the bay. Mark Dennis The well travelled horse, whose career now spans a total of 249 starts, has won races at tracks throughout Australia with victories at Mildura, Melton, Albion Park, Kapunda and Cranbourne to go alongside his most winning ways around Menangle and the fore-mentioned Globe Derby. His most recent turning-back-the-clock performance a reminder to all that  writing off  Mark Dennis due to his advancing years is a very risky proposition indeed. The racing success of Mark Dennis can, at least partly, be attributed to his impeccable breeding as the son of Bettor’s Delight is out of the proven broodmare Twice As Good. Along with Mark Dennis the Butler B G mare has foaled Fight Fire With Fire (7 wins, $150,000) the Group 1 Queen Of Hearts winner Waitfornoone and the consistent St Barts who ran Monkey King to a nose at Addington in the Winter Cup of 2009.  He’d go on to notch up 14 wins and over $150,000 in earnings across both New Zealand and Australia. A number of yearlings from this strong family are to be offered at the 2020 National Standardbred Yearling Sale. Two of which both come from the Breckon Farms draft. Lot 118, a brown filly by A Rocknroll Dance, is out of Fellamongstabeauty (1 win from 2 starts) who is a 1/2 sister to the mother of the dominate 4yr old Pacing Mare Of The Year Elle Mac. Elle Mac claimed numerous Group 1 titles including, but not limited to, the Northern Oaks, Sires Stakes 3yr Old Fillies Championship, Caduceus Club 2yr old Fillies and Harness Jewels. The A Rocknroll Dance sire choice makes sense when you consider that the now Australian based Miss Streisand, who placed 4th in the Victorian Oaks, is also by the sire and raced with distinction in New Zealand prior to being exported. Lot 118 - Dancing Desire Lot 121 is another yearling with close ties to Mark Dennis. “In The Spotlight” a Bettor’s Delight filly is out of the early-going Goodlookingbabe who was impressive on the track with 3 wins from just 14 starts when racing out of the Geoff Small stable. “In The Spotlight” is only the second foal out of the mare with her first foal being sold for $35’000 at the 2019 sales. Lot 121 - In The Spotlight Ben McMillan  

The progeny of Always B Miki broke records at the harness racing Brisbane APG sale! Three of his progeny sold for an average of $53,833 with a top price of $77,500. Congratulations to Lindsay and Mary Vagg who sold the top lot and to Goodtime Lodge for making the purchase. Victree Bette colt - $77,500 (record QLD price). Vendor: LJ Vagg & ME Vagg. Oh So Hippie colt - $60,000. Vendor: Wayne Comerford. Rockin Riches colt - $24,000. Vendor: Pinaroo Park. Victree Bette is by Bettors Delight and has already produced the Group 1 winner Pinup Boy. It is tremendous to see such results for a stallion we have a huge amount of faith in. Be sure to check out the Always B Miki yearlings at the upcoming sales across Australia and New Zealand in the coming weeks - don't miss out on securing one! ALWAYS B MIKI'S SALE HIGHLIGHTS Leading first season sire at the 2019 US yearling sales (third overall behind only Somebeachsomewhere and Captaintreacherous) Leading sire at the 2020 Brisbane APG yearling sale Second leading sire at the 2019 NZB Auckland All Age Sale behind Art Major (3+ weanlings)   The sale topper!

A very tough Down Under harness racing pacer continues winning races at aged 12. Bettors Fire N, the winner of over $1m, wins again at Yonkers Raceway, in the $20,000 pace in 1:54.1, for trainer Heidi Gibbs and driver Ron Cushing. It was the son of Bettors Delights 57th career victory and holds a lifetime mark of 1:50.2. While racing Down Under, Bettors Fire N was the winner of a staggering 12 Group races and was also placed at Group level on a further 10 occasions. Bettors Fire N is out of top mare Sparks A Flyin 1:52 ($650,000), makes him a ¾ brother to Saturday nights Victorian Oaks winner Dr Susan NZ. This is a family in top form. Bettors Fire N Nice Down Under pacer ticks over a quarter of a million dollars in stakes with latest win. Stars Align A was seen winning the $22,000 pace at Yonkers Raceway on Saturday night, clocking a time of 1:54.2 around the half mile (800m) racetrack, for trainer Rene Allard and driver Daniel Dube. It notched the son of Art Major's lifetime earnings past $313,000, while being his 16th career victory. The 7yo Entire holds a lifetime marks of 1:50.8. When racing Down Under, Stars Align was placed at Group level twice while racing at stakes level. Stars Align A   Monday 20th January   Yonkers Raceway NY Bettors Fire N – Time: 1:54.1, Stake: $20,000 Alberto Contador N – Time: 1:54.4, Stake: $14,500 Globaldomination N – Time: 1:55.0, Stake: $16,000   Tuesday 21st January   The Meadows PA The Spinster N – Time: 1:55.1, Stake: $9,600   Yonkers Raceway NY Motu Moonbeam N – Time: 1:55.3, Stake: $14,500   Wednesday 22nd January   Dover Downs DE Bettor Rock On N – Time: 1:54.1, Stake: $5,000 Firebby A – Time: 1:53.0, Stake: $7,500 Anytime N – Time: 1:52.0, Stake: $9,500 Rock N Shard N – Time: 1:52.1, Stake: $16,000 Delishka N – Time: 1:51.1, Stake: $25,000 Flashazz N – Time: 1:54.0, Stake: $11,500   Monticello Raceway NY Naughty Maravu N – Time: 1:57.2, Stake: $5,500   Rosecroft Raceway MD Jive Dancing A – Time: 1:53.2, Stake: $8,500   Thursday 23rd January   Dover Downs DE Bad Boy Brad A – Time: 1:51.2, Stake: $15,000   Monticello Raceway NY Fiery Lustre N – Time: 1:59.2, Stake: $2,500   Yonkers Raceway NY Shezallapples A – Time: 1:56.0, Stake: $12,500   Friday 24th January   Miami Valley Raceway OH Onspeed N – Time: 1:57.2, Stake: $10,000   The Meadows PA Mister Spot A – Time: 1:52.2, Stake: $13,500   Yonkers Raceway NY Northern Assassin A – Time: 1:55.2, Stake: $12,500 Milliondollargem A – Time: 1:54.1, Stake: $22,000 Sudden Change N – Time: 1:54.2, Stake: $20,000 Titanium N – Time: 1:55.4, Stake: $14,500   Woodbine Mohawk Park CA Sly Eleanor N – Time: 1:53.4, Stake: $20,00   Saturday 25th January   Freehold Raceway NJ Shineonucrazydiamond A – Time: 1:53.2, Stake: $12,000 Matchu N – Time: 1:54.2, Stake: $7,700   Meadowlands NJ Lifeonthebeach A – Time: 1:51.0, Stake: $11,250   Miami Valley Raceway OH Iam Erik N – Time: 1:52.4, Stake: $15,000   Yonkers Raceway NY Anythingforlove A – Time: 1:53.1, Stake: $20,000 Stars Align A – Time: 1:54.2, Stake: $22,000 Soho Lennon A – Time: 1:53.2, Stake: $27,000   Woodbine Mohawk Park CA Sweet N Fast N – Time: 1:57.0, Stake: $12,000 Heza Thrill N – Time: 1:57.4, Stake: $14,000   Sunday 26th January   Pompano Park FL Alluneedisfaith N – Time: 1:51.0, Stake: $9,500   Carter Dalgety

Lilydale hobby breeder Shane Hawes is probably best known as the breeder-owner of the smart racemare Ark Breeze, the winner of the 2016 Granny Smith and runner-up in the Bandbox.   He will be offering the first offspring of the Stonebridge Regal mare, a lovely colt from the initial crop of the USA Breeders Crown and Adios winner Racing Hill at the Tasmanian Harness Sale at Carrick on Saturday, February 15.   The colt ranks as a half-brother to Frankie Falzoni (11 wins and $81,890) and recent Launceston winner Ark Fury, who were both bred by Hawes. He is Lot 1 in the catalogue.   The other entry from Hawes is a bay colt from the first crop of the dual Vicbred champion and Chariots of Fire and South Australian Pacing Cup winner Guaranteed.   The colt’s dam, Flightofthedragon, is a Shadow Play daughter of the Matron Stakes winner Penny’s Dragon and is a member of the same family as the Tasmanian classics winners Carla Ross, Celtic Ross and Ellie Ross.   He is the first foal of his unraced dam and is listed as Lot 10.   Both colts are being prepared for the sale by Bangor horsemen Michael and Jim Smith, of All Style Sammy fame.   Hawes, a retired smelter worker, has been involved in harness racing since 1996. His other credits include the Belmont winner Our Meadow Lady, the Dandy Patch placegetter Rockandahardplace, Just Lucky (8 wins), Apache River, Barbies Ticket and Dont Blink.     by Peter Wharton

Enthusiastic Ballarat teenager Brent Murphy was probably always going to find his way into harness racing - and recently he got the perfect kick start to his career. Murphy is the son of respected trainer and driver David and his wife Erin and landed his first-ever winner when successful with Madeeba at Maryborough last Thursday afternoon. "It was pretty exciting. I've only had about a dozen drives so it was awesome to get my first winner. I won quite comfortably, but dad told me I may have gone for home a bit early!" Murphy said. The youngster, who celebrated his 18th birthday yesterday, is now full-time in the industry, working for his parents, who prepare a team of about 20 horses at their Dunnstown property, just 15 minutes east of Ballarat. "I finished Year 11 last year with a certificate two in agriculture. But I was always going to be doing the horses because I've been around them for as long as I can remember," Murphy said. "There will be mum, dad and myself doing them, although my younger brother Declan is keen too and recently started trackwork, so it won't be too long before he joins us as well," he said. "We have an older brother in Aidan, but he's not into them much at all." Murphy said while he was pleased to post his first winner, he was elated to get success for John and Maree Caldow, of Melton. "They are just great and whenever I bump into John, we always have a bit of a joke. He's a fantastic fella," Murphy said. After starting two off the inside of the back row with the beautifully-bred Madeeba (Courage Under Fire-Mesmerizing (Our Sir Vancelot), Murphy showed a cool head to bide his time and landed nicely in the one-out line and three back. "The horse felt great in the run and when the tempo picked up in the final half, he was always travelling on the bit," he said. Murphy angled out three wide into the home corner and Madeeba knuckled down nicely. He scored by five metres from Australian Bite with Raptover A Rainbow a further two metres away in third spot. The time was a respectable 1.58-5 on a rain affected track. To watch the video replay click here. "The track attendants were obviously aware it was my first winner and they clapped and cheered me off the track. It was a nice bit of fun and I had a few beers to celebrate later with dad on our way home," he said. "Then there were more celebrations with mum and the rest of the family because we went out that night." Murphy said he decided to give up on tennis a few years ago to make way for the horses. "But I'm hoping to be able to stick with football. My two brothers play, but we'll have to see how it goes. For the moment I've got to just aim at getting another winner at the trots!" Terry Gange NewsAlert PR Mildura

A half-brother to the harness racing Breeders Crown champion Hurricane Harley and half-sisters to the APG Final and Breeders Crown winner Follow The Stars and the Victoria Derby and dual Breeders Crown champion Our Little General will spearhead the Northern Rivers Equine draft at the Australian Pacing Gold sale at Oaklands Junction on Sunday, February 2. Northern Rivers Equine, Kyabram, the home of American Ideal, Mel Mara and Yankee Rockstar, will present 13 yearlings – four colts and nine fillies – on behalf of clients Lauriston Bloodstock, Greg Fleming and Phil and Tracey Wade. Bill and Anne Anderson’s Lauriston Bloodstock, the dual Victorian Breeders of the Year and whose stock have won 25 Group 1 races to date, have nominated eight superbly bred yearlings – two colts and six fillies. Their consignment includes a Somebeachsomewhere colt from the APG Final winner Musical Delight (Lot 171); a Bettor’s Delight half-sister to Our Little General and Kasbah Kid (Lot 153); an Art Major half-brother to Hurricane Harley and Mango Stride (1:50.9) as Lot 230; a Captaintreacherous half-sister to Follow The Stars and APG runner-up Stefsbest (Lot 222); an Art Major sister to the Victoria Sapling winner Abouttime and half-sister to the speedy None Bettor (1:48.8) as Lot 158; a Sweet Lou filly out of the Breeders Crown champion Glenferrie Shuffle (Lot 122); a Bettor’s Delight half-sister to three in 1:56 including Rocknroll Icon (Lot 189); and an American Ideal filly from the Group 3 placegetter Artistic Angel (Lot 73). Swan Hill breeder-owner Greg Fleming, who bred and raced the former top racemare Helen’s Bonus, is selling at the APG for the first time. Fleming has nominated two progeny of the champion American juvenile and now leading sire Captaintreacherous. Lot 127 is a colt out of the McArdle mare Glitterazzi, a half-sister to millionaire pacer Bling It On and the Miracle Mile winner Baby Bling, while Lot 68 is a filly from the prolific WA and USA winner Arctic Fire, a half-sister to the NZ 2YO Filly of the Year Classy Filly. Kyabram breeders Phil and Tracey Wade, who bred, raised and sold the Group placegetter Dee Double You at the 2017 APG sale, have a three-prong draft at this year’s sale. They are offering a grand looking filly from the first crop of world champion Always B Miki that is a half-sister to Dee Double You and hails from the family of crack racemares Louvre and Miss Hazel, as Lot 148. The Wade’s other two yearlings are both by A G’s White Socks’ sire, the great Rock N Roll Heaven. Lot 204 is a half-brother to Philtra Phella, a winner of 20 races in Victoria and Tasmania and almost $100,000, while Lot 235 is a daughter of the Somebeachsomewhere mare Somesorta Philtra, a half-sister to Dee Double You. For an inspection of the Northern Rivers Equine draft phone Kath McIntosh on 0427 497 429 or (03) 5852 2845. Peter Wharton  

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Alan Playford Galloway, the man who founded Australia’s most successful ever harness racing stud farm Alabar, was buried this past week shortly before his 92nd birthday – what they left behind were many memories of a versatile and colourful horseman, a leading Aussie Rules footballer in his day, a highly respected mounted policeman, later excelling in yachting, kayaking, flying his own plane, driving fast cars, and becoming a highly successful businessman through sheer hard work and a bright and active mind. Born on March 15, 1928, his father Faulkner Galloway became General Manager of the State Bank of Australia in South Australia with the son growing up to be extremely close to his Uncle Tom (Sir Thomas Playford), the longest serving Commonwealth State Premier in Australian history, 27 years in total. Following in his father’s footsteps at the bank was never an.option. From the time he first went to Wakerie High School (up by the Murray River) Alan knew he preferred later taking up farming. His father Faulkner was then spending some years at Waikerie as the local bank manager on his way to the very top. When Alan ended his days at the local high school, he soon after began attending Roseworthy Agricultural College, some 90 miles from where he lived. There was no direct means of travelling between Roseworthy and Waikerie. This hiccup was overcome by the teenager often keeping his horse Ned at the college to enable him to ride all that way back home when required.  . Ned was not a retired trotter or pacer. He proudly wore the X70 brand of the noted Kidman’s having been bred at their Macumba Station. A horse with the toughness and talent of Ned was one hell-of-a-way to learn about horses at an early age. Alan was going on for 19 when Aussie Rules football derailed his days at the college. North Adelaide, in the SANFL, had heard glowing reports about this high flying star in country football it was said would ‘walk’ into any team in Adelaide, and a recruiting officer arrived in town with promises of what he could expect if he signed up with the Roosters, the colourful name North wore with pride. In next to no time, this six-foot plus firebrand was the key to the senior’s backline, playing a tough brand of footy that had the Adelaide media constantly naming him: ‘The iron man of football’, despite him earning several broken bones in his first couple of seasons. When those rugged games of interstate matches between South Australia and Victoria were held in those days, he was one of the first selected. Among the Vic’s team in the early 1950’s were such forwards as Brownlow medallists Ron ‘Smokey’ Clegg (Sth Melbourne) and Fred Flanagan (Geelong). When North Adelaide won the 1952 premiership, the club’s official program for that day provided pen pictures of their leading players. Written beneath a picture of Alan Galloway were the words: Alan Galloway is a hard-hitting and tenacious defender when heading up the team’s backline. No Adelaide or Melbourne footballer then made much money out of the game like they do today. This meant they all had a second job. Alan wanted to be close to horses, so on moving to Adelaide to live, he became a member of the South Australian Mounted Police. He never minded the big nights at Wayville trots being one of the two who usually attended to help keep the thousands who turned up.  He also helped break-in new greys to become part of the police squad. Being a tall and good looking sportsman, Alan was looked on as a good catch by a number of female supporters of the Roosters. The one who finally did the catching was an attractive hairdresser named Barbara Day. When finally popping the question to her, it was not such a case of her marrying a champion sportsman, as Barbara actually hailed from a well known pioneering family of Adelaide that in the mid-1800’s owned much of the land in the new suburb of North Adelaide. The Day’s have roads and other milestones named after them in Adelaide today. Surprisingly, it was on the Day’s side of the family that the first member of the two families became involved in harness racing. This was Barbara’s father, a farmer out at Bolivar, who with his brother Len opened a stud farm with two sires about the time World War 2 came to an end.  It was a business deal to try and boost the numbers with the war having left a shortage of young horses, but his sires left much to be desired. A recent photo of Alan and Barbara Galloway The couple would have three children – two daughters Julie and Greer, and an only son named Alan Thomas Galloway. All three were great around the home and the farm, as Alan had worked hard to develop a dairy farm, building it to having upwards of a hundred cows. He added to this work a delivery round, calling on dozens and dozens of householders around Mt Barker, with Alan usually driving the vehicle with two of his kids filling up milk for the householders.    Of the many bad injuries he suffered playing football, none were as serious as what occurred early in 1955 to his back. It required neurosurgery, a delicate operation then in its infancy working on the spine. Even today it remains a last option, as in stapling of the spine usually has the patient losing two or three inches in height.. His football days were virtually over. A second such operation would follow 25 years later, with Alan’s height then becoming less than six feet. His first standardbred was Barker Boy, a horse that won numerous races. Several years later he purchased the broodmare Grand Potts, a half-sister of Ketchil, that would produce the outstanding Sheffield Globe. He was on the right track, as when he bred Grand Potts to Aachen, it produced a handsome colt that Alan broke in himself.and knew it was very good. When thinking of a name, they agreed to name it after their property they had recently thought up. This came to be by using the first three letters of Alan, then joining this to the first three letters of Barbara, which gave them  ALABAR.  They decide  to use this as part of the colt’s name – Bold Alabar.  It became an outstanding young pacer winning many races before they accepted a big offer from owner Bert Whirburn, the best pacer top Melbourne reinsman Neville Gath said he ever drove. Three generations of Galloways - Alan senior, Alan Junior and young Thomas all on on bikes in Thailand Alabar first became a stud farm as part of their dairy farm when securing the colonial-bred Stepping Chief to stand there. This pacer at one stage had won 16 races in a row. It stood just the one season for them as during that first year, Alan had a visitor to the farm in Kiwi Noel Simpson who was buying stallions in North America for not much money, then either selling them or leasing them to Australian stud farms. Alabar decided to give Simpson’s imports a go, and the next season they stood Leopard Hanover (Torpid) and Trainer Hanover (Tar Heel).  Both were good enough to have several breeders from Victoria crossing the border to use these sires.  It was the next stallion Simpson sent him that hit the jackpot.  This was Golden Adios, the very first son of Adios to come to Australia. It was a real winner with our mares. Among the winners Alan bred was Sovereign Adios that he sold to owners at Bendigo where this horse later sired the mighty Popular Alm. When a property came up for sale at Nairne in the second year of the horse breeding at the dairy farm, they drove the eight miles over to Nairne to look at it, finding this to be far more suitable for horse breeding than where they were at Mt. Barker. Selling off all dairy cows, sheds and the house and property,  they moved across to Nairne where breeding standardbreds had Alabar Farm up running with several sires, all from North America.    When Alan Jnr wanted to go overseas to see how stud farms in North America and France operated when he was 18, he spent most of Australia’s cold winter months overseas, returning to South Australia having learned a great deal when away. His father was so pleased to greet him on return that he went in partnership with the boy with the first Porsche 930 Turbo to be imported to Australia. Many years later Alan Thomas Galloway would return the complement to his father when Alan was to celebrate his 89th birthday. Flying in to Sydney from Thailand where he had been living for 12 years, the son collected a $200,000 Mercedes Sports as his gift to his father. That day Alan Snr again displayed his sense of humour when he had the car’s exhaust blow out all the candles on the cake. The many trophies gain by Alabar bred horses over the years. Only recently the father and son agreed they would buy a horse at the February yearling sales they would race together for the first time. But the usually good health of his father took a turn, with doctors later stating how his heart had simply given up. Max Agnew, the Victorian author of numerous books on harness racing, has almost ready for release a book on the two Alan Galloways with many colourful stories about ALABAR and the breeders who support them. It runs to more than 500 pages, so look for it in May.  
Club Menangle has confirmed industry rumours of a further commitment to the harness racing industry in New South Wales. Australian Pacing Gold (APG) has announced that Harness Racing Victoria will contribute an additional $25,000 towards the two-year old fillies and two-year old colts and geldings Gold Bullion Finals to be held in Victoria in 2021. The bonus will be paid to the owner/s of the highest placed Victorian bred horse in either final and sold out of the 2020 APG sales. The horse must be sold through the sale and potential buyers should note the conditions. “Club Menangle Directors have been monitoring the horrendous impact of the drought across New South Wales for the past eighteen months”, said Club Menangle’s Chair, Robert Marshall. The record dry has had an enormous impact on the harness racing industry in this state and made worse by the unprecedent bushfires which have ravaged parts of New South Wales since just before Christmas. While it may be too late for Santa Claus, Robert and his fellow Club Menangle director on the Board of APG, Bill Ellis worked with HRV APG directors to develop an additional incentive for the forthcoming Melbourne and Sydney APG sales. Bill Ellis said the Club Menangle Board was committed to implementing an incentive ahead of the sales, given the conditions prevailing in NSW. Owners of horses purchased through APG’s Sydney sale and bred in NSW (inseminated, foaled and branded) will be eligible to compete for the Sydney bonus of $25,000 in both two-year old Finals.  Robert Marshall noted the important characteristic of the bonus was that it would not necessarily go to the winner of the Sydney Gold Bullion Final. If the winner was not bred in NSW and not sold at the Sydney APG sale, the bonus would go to the next highest placed NSW bred horse. The news has been welcomed by the New South Wales harness racing industry. Success Stud co-proprietor, Jackie Gibson thanked Club Menangle for supporting the breeding industry in New South Wales and highlighted the value in purchasing a yearling through the Sydney APG sale. It makes sense to purchase in New South Wales due to the support Club Menangle provides. Rod Woodhouse, the owner of Yirribee Stud, said “this is another example of Club Menangle’s leadership in New South Wales. On the eve of the Sky Carnival of Miracles, its another reason to breed and own in NSW.” Club Menangle also funds the NSW Blue Series. Another Club Menangle funding initiative. All in all, it’s as easy as APG! Club Menangle
Somewhere in Tony Herlihy’s harness racing stable there’s a calendar with a big red circle around the months of December and January and the words “Dina Brown” scribbled all over it. There has to be! The daughter of Bettor’s Delight has made the summer months her own in recent weeks bringing up two wins and three minor placings in her last six starts. This strong run of form started on the 13th of December with a mile-distance second to The Paua Diver at Alexandra Park and was quickly followed by a gallant second to Fabrizio when gearing up to celebrate the end of the year on the 31st of December. Her form obviously wasn’t effected by any 2020 celebratory hangover with a comfortable win accomplished at Cambridge on the 5th of January when driven by junior driver Taitlyn Hanara.    Her latest trip into the birdcage for photos being an emphatic four length romp at Alexandra Park on the 24th of January when setting a sound pace and running away from race rivals at the top of the straight. The overall time of 2.41.4 over the 2200m mobile completed without the use of the persuader. This run of consistent winning form mimics an initial 3yr old campaign which saw Dina Brown win or place in three from her four starts over the same December-January period. While the mare does seem to have penchant for sun-god worship it’s also worth remembering that she’s been able to foot it in all conditions with a third placing in the 3yo Diamond at last seasons Harness Jewels behind none other than Princess Tiffany and race winner Belle Of Montana. The performance, albeit aided by the inside draw, came on an easy Addington track that had been the victim of heavy rains the night before. The recent race record of Dina Brown is starting to deliver on a strong family tradition, that of winning. Her dam Pullover Brown (121 wins, $333,000) left fields in her wake during the early 2000’s with notable victories coming in the form of an NZ Oaks title alongside a truly successful Australian campaign that included wins in the Victorian Oaks, Australian Oaks (5 length winner over the Maurice Mckendry driven Classical) and a Breeders Crown 3yr old Fillies Final title captured at Bendigo. Pullover Brown, herself a full sister to the sub-1.50 pacer Montecito, has also been able to add a well coiled broodmare-string to her bow leaving serial Australian winner In Runaway Bay (39 wins, $279’000) and Dina Bolt, who placed in the Group 2 2yo Classic behind Virgil at Invercargill in April of last year and currently has two wins from just eight race-day starts.   The next “Pullover-production” is due to to be offered at the 2020 National Standardbred Yearling Sale at Karaka on the 16th of February. Coming out of the Breckon Farms draft Lot 19, a son of American Ideal, carries the name American Conqueror and will no doubt have his fair share of ability. Lot 19 - American Conqueror His favourite time of year is yet to be determined…           Ben McMillan
Shepparton trainer David Farrar was a little surprised when huge odds of 60/1 were served up for his pacer The Kew Legend at one of Leeton Harness Racing Club's feature meetings of the season recently. Farrar qualified the Bettors Delight-sired two-year-old for the $30,600 Group Three Southern Central Engineering Breeders Plate Final last Friday night and believed he wasn't without some chance. "We didn't have a great deal of luck a fortnight earlier in a qualifying heat-we were out the back; there was a bit of interference and it was a stinking hot day," he said. "The temperature was in the mid-40s and all-in-all, it wasn't ideal for a youngster making his debut. He did get dehydrated and then we couldn't get him to pee before the race." The Kew Legend ran fifth to grab a spot in the big final, but Farrar said that very first trip did his horse "the world of good" in the end. "It was an experience and he was better for it come the final. When Damo (driver Damian Wilson) was able to get the lead, I was very happy. The horse is a relaxed customer and has always shown a good attitude," Farrar said. "Thankfully he dug deep over the final stages when another horse loomed up beside him. We just got there by a half neck, but it was great." Farrar has captured some nice races in his career, including a Country Championship years ago at Moonee Valley, but group success has eluded him - until Friday night. "I've competed in the Leeton event five times previously. I've gone up with a few horses owned by Noel Tyndall, from Nathalia, but the closest we ever got was fourth," he said. "It was an excellent drive by Damo. He's a good driver, very under-rated in my opinion. "While I've known him for a long time, I've only been using him for the past two years. He always comes to the trials for me-and it was at a trials night he convinced me the horse was worth a shot at Leeton." Farrar started training when he was 18 years old, but took a break five years later. "When the kids were growing up I decided to give the horses away. I was out for about 17 years, but now I've been back at it for the last 32 years, so it has been a long association," he said. "It has sort of been like a big wheel. You just have to keep working at it and you will get rewarded for your efforts." Farrar, who has been enjoying a great deal of success this season with his team, said The Kew Legend was now raced by the estate of former top sportsman Jack Carr. Jack, who died a few months ago, played senior football for West Torrens in SA, and also represented the State in Shield cricket. He played with Sir Garfield (Garry) Sobers, considered cricket's greatest all-rounders, and won the Sir Donald Bradman medal on one occasion. He was also pretty handy with the golf clubs! "I was lucky to have had horses with Jack over the last 17 years and I think there was only one that didn't win a race for us," Farrar said. "The Kew Legend will have a quiet time for a bit before tackling the Bathurst Gold Crown heats and final in late March," he said. "I've visited Bathurst previously, but we've never raced up there, so we're looking forward to it."   Terry Gange NewsAlert PR Mildura
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