Day At The Track
Let It Ride,Harness racing

Emerging star wins Blacks A Fake

Tim Butt knows a thing or two about preparing a Grand Circuit winner. The champion horseman has prepared more Grand Circuit winners than any other trainer in this part of the world….and by a good margin! His tally now stands at 52 (17 pacing & 35 trotting events). And his latest winner came via the final leg of the 2017/18 Australian Pacing Gold Grand Circuit season, the Gr.1 $200,540 UBET Blacks A Fake Queensland Championship at Albion Park tonight (Saturday). Rising star Let It Ride ($4.30) confirmed his status as a genuine star of the future with a brilliant and resounding victory in the 2680m feature event when easily defeating Atomic Red ($3.90 fav) and Alleluia ($32.60) in a track record time of 1:54.8 (Our Hi Jinx held previous mark at 1:55.0). Handled by star reinsman Dexter Dunn who overcame an illness the night prior, the recent Gr.1 Breeders Challenge winner was given a perfect run in behind the pace setting Atomic Red before racing clear soon after straightening. With Glenferrie Hood and Tact Tate both leaving the gate with urgency, Dunn bided his time before charging forward quickly to take the lead away from Glenferrie Hood at the 2000m mark. The winning move came shortly after when Dunn elected to take cover behind the hard-running Atomic Red. The lead time was covered in 74.9 seconds. Atomic Red led the way from Ultimate Art who improved his position quickly while Let It Ride sat perfectly in the trail. The first half of the final mile was covered in 29.2 and 29.4 seconds. Entering the back straight, Atomic Red led from Ultimate Art and Let It Ride while Cruz Bromac improved three-wide solo with My Field Marshal catching his cover. Cruz Bromac raced roughly mid-way down the back straight and checked My Field Marshal while Carlas Pixel and Ohoka Punter also copped interference. The third quarter was covered in 28.9 seconds. At the top of the home straight, Atomic Red attempted to kick away but Let It Ride quickly loomed to his outside and the put the result beyond doubt very quickly. The winning margin was a widening 13.5m over Atomic Red while there was a further 4.5m back to Alleluia in third. The final quarter was timed in 28.7 seconds. “We got a perfect trip and got lucky to follow the right horse throughout, he took us right to the home straight and I knew my guy was feeling great in the pocket and he quickened nicely over the latter part.” Dunn said. For Dunn, it was his 7th Grand Circuit victory. Again, the management of Butt was pinpoint accurate following his decision earlier this week to bypass the original target of the 4yo Championship (support feature) and concentrate on the main event coupled with flying Dunn in from New Zealand to partner the gelding. At the time, it was a big gamble but one that has paid handsome dividends. It was first test against genuine open class rivals. Let It Ride has now won 15 of his 27 starts. Connections will now switch their focus towards the Inter Dominion series in Melbourne later this year. The 2017/18 Australian Pacing Gold Grand Circuit season is now complete with global superstar Lazarus set to be crowned champion after amassing 304 points throughout the term. Lazarus finished well clear of Soho Tribeca (205) and Tiger Tara (145). Chris Barsby

Bronson Munro,Harness racing

Munro charged for abusing two female drivers

A promising harness racing driver with previous form for abuse has pled guilty to misconduct after abusing two female drivers. Bronson Munro was banned from rugby for 46 weeks in 2016 over a racial insult towards a Fijian rugby player in a high-level Canterbury country game. He found himself again in strife over an incident at a junior drivers' event at Forbury Park, Dunedin, on June 15. Munro was charged with misconduct for using foul language against Charlotte Purvis and Sheree Tomlinson during and after Race 8, in which he believed his horse should have been given the lead by the female drivers. Read the full story here Article by Martin van Beynen Reprinted with permission of Stuff

Chase Auckland,Harness racing

Setback for Chase Auckland

Chase Auckland may have has lost two weeks out of his NZ Cup preparation with a minor injury but that is by no means the end of the penny section as the Aussies say. "It's a muscle thing, something he has just nicked in  the paddock and is nothing serious" Natalie said "We have put him on ultrasound treatment and we expect that it will be all cleared up in two weeks tops" "If that is the way it works out it doesn't threaten a Cup preparation but any longer and it could be a problem from that point of view. But I doubt it will take any longer than that and probably not that long" Chase Auckland returned to the stable recently to begin his new preparation which is not guaranteed to end in a NZ Cup attempt anyway. With all the rich four year old features on both sides of the Tasman through the spring and summer it is being viewed as an option in a perfect scenario but nothing beyond that at this stage.    Courtesy of All Stars Website

Blair Orange,Harness racing

Orange smashes through record barrier

Leading reinsman Blair Orange has produced the greatest season by a New Zealand harness racing driver, officially breaking new ground with win number 230 at Addington last night. Going into last night Orange still needed three wins to tie the old mark of 229 wins in a season, set by Dexter Dunn in last years premiership.  In the end it was a cakewalk for Orange who finished up winning four races at the New Zealand Metropolitan trotting club racenight and he could be considered unlucky not to win a fifth when beaten a nose into second driving Sharnae in Race 6 for trainer Brad Mowbray.  Orange won the first of his four win bag in Race 5, leading all the way with in form trotter Flyinova who was backing up from a win at Ashburton last weekend. The Jeff Wheeler trained trotter always had the field covered in front and was simply too good for his opposition over the extreme distance of 3200m. His next win came in heat three of the South Of The Waitaki series when Whata Razzle Dazzle sprinted home in 55.8 seconds for his last 800m to grab a deserved win. Blair then equaled the record 229 wins with another front running display on trotter Idle Moose, who won Race 9 convincingly after being very unlucky in his previous start when getting carted back on the turn. It was only fitting that he broke the record driving the winner of Race 10 as well, getting home on a relative outsider in All Nuts And Bolts for his good friend David Pearce,who trains the Bettor's Delight gelding at his West Melton stables. With another week still left in the season, Orange looks sure to build on that total and set a mark that will be very hard to break in years to come.   Harnesslink Media

East Rutherford, NJ - Trainer Jimmy Takter brought the down under sensation Lazarus out for gate schooling after today's qualifiers and the pair went a dazzling mile in 1:51 flat, the only company being two trotters that were unable to keep up and the only encouragement a few "C'mon boy" calls from the driver.   Fractions were 29.2, 57, 1:25.3, 1:51.   The six-year-old New Zealand bred son of Bettors Delight was imported by Taylor Made Stallions and is expected to contest the top older horse events for the balance of the season.   Breakfast WithThe Babies (BWTB), sponsored by Fashion Farms Meadowlands Pace Day edition, was conducted at 9:00 am under ideal conditions, no wind and temperatures of 70 degrees. Pacing colts opened the card today and Goldberg rode the Team Teague bus up from Harrington this morning then went a sensational mile in 1:51.3 for catch driver Dewayne Minor. He went right to the front, set fast fractions and closed it out in 27.3 in hand. Artie's Ideal (Marcus Miller) rallied between horses for second and Alittlewiggleroom, driven by George Teague, gained wide late for third. Goldberg is a Montrell Teague homebred by family sire Mr Wiggles and is trained by his aunt Brenda Teague. Captain McKee was a 1:53.4 winner for trainer Tony Alagna and driver Scott Zeron. Zeron afforded the Captaintreacherous colt a perfect trip behind eventual second place finisher Cub Fan (Andy Miller), tipping off that one in the stretch through the 27.2 final panel for the win. Brittany Farms, Marvin Katz, Brad Grant and Captain Trevor Racing gave $75,000 for the Hanover bred at Harrisburg last fall. Pacing filly Pace Baby Pace (Andy Miller) put one in the win column for her sire Sweet Lou with a 1:56.1 score for the Burke barn. She sat a pocket to Passion Struck (Andy McCarthy) through reasonable fractions then sailed by under minimal encouragement form the driver. JK Mardi Says (Zeron) rallied wide nicely for the place. The winner is a homebred for Burke Racing and Weaver Bruscemi, LLC. Trotting fillies came next and Sister's Promise can now be counted among the winners from Father Patrick's first crop after her effortless 2:00.4 score for Tim Tetrick. Celebrity Serena cut the mile through slow numbers and led until mid-stretch where the winner and Mother Teresa (Zeron) went by in the 28.4 final stanza. Linda Toscano trains Sister's Promise for Brittany Farms. She was a $120,000 Harrisburg yearling, bred by Fred Hertrich, III. Andy and Julie Miller won the next race with the Donato Hanover filly American Kronos in 1:58. Getting away in third, American Kronos accelerated when asked around the last bend and sailed by early leader Lindy Pearl (Zeron) through the 27.4 end to the mile. Marvin Katz, Al Libfeld and David Goodrow own the winner, bred in Italy by Allevamento Kronos. Full Right (Justin Morrison) won in 1:59.1, surging by a stubborn Celebrity Stalone (Minor) in the shadow of the wire. Jim Campbell trains the homebred son of RC Royalty for Runthetable Stable. Finally Dewayne Minor doubled up for the day by driving Fearless Dreamer, an Explosive Matter colt from Bold Dreamer to a front stepping 1:59.1 win over Practical Cat (Takter). The winner is owned by Rivers Stable who gave $35,000 from the Valley High consignment at the Lexington Yearling Sale. Also of note last season's Dan Patch award winning freshman trotter Fourth Dimension went a flat qualifier in 1:52.4 for Brian Sears as trainer Marcus Melander continues to seek answers to the colt's erratic performances thus far this year. Live racing tonight at 8:00 and it's Corntastic Night! Lazarus “schools” in an approximate time of 1:51. Last qua in 25 and change. pic.twitter.com/U2fkysunXM— Dave Brower (@eedoogie) July 21, 2018 by Nick Salvi, for the Meadowlands

Trotting's top couple couldn't have picked a better time to specialise. And punters who have followed Michelle Wallis and Bernie Hackett during their record-setting season will be enormously on the right side of the ledger going into Alexandra Park's second last meeting of the season tonight. Wallis and Hackett have trained 38 winners for the season, a personal best but more remarkably 37 of them have been trotters. Only Phil Williamson, with a New Zealand record 58 trotting wins in a season, has trained more but 25 of the Wallis/Hackett team's wins have lucratively come at Alexandra Park. Their huge season comes at a time when Alexandra Park are programming more trotting races and at stake levels unimaginable a few years ago.   With medium class trotting stakes set to hit $20,000 per race from next March, Wallis says Alexandra Park and a decision she and Hackett made has saved their stable. "The stakes at Alexandra Park are great and getting better and that has been huge for us, and other trainers," she told the Herald. "And there are plenty of trotting races which is crucial for us because that is what we target. "We decided to concentrate on them because not only do we have a lot of experience with them but we don't get the money to go to the yearling sales and buy well-bred pacing yearlings. With the trotters we also don't have to race the biggest, most powerful stables as often as we would with pacers." Although Wallis and Hackett have proud histories as trainers of trotters, both before they were a couple and since, they have also had top pacers such as Sly Flyin, Waitfornoone and, in Hackett's case, even Gypsy Vance decades ago. "But we would be happy to only train trotters these days, even though the only pacer we have at the moment, Like A Wildfire, is a really nice horse in the making. "With 37 trotting wins and nearly $500,000 in stakes this season we feel like we have made the right decision." Part of their support base are South Island owners looking at the smaller fields and bigger stakes for trotters at Alexandra Park while other horses are sent to their beach training environment almost as a last resort. "We do actually have a jog track but all the fast work is done on the beach and that suits a lot of horses." Tonight the stable take their only pacing winner for the season, Like A Wildfire, to race five (which he can win) but have more favoured chances in the three trotting races. "I think Jansson is the best of our chances in race four because he likes the 2200m," she explains. Madhubala will be among the favourites for race seven but Wallis is not excited by her 40m handicap over 2200m, even though the race lacks many rivals with bright futures. The last race tonight sees the highly-talented Mr Good And Evil up against exciting three-year-old Sundees Son and Wallis is in two minds over the outcome of the event. "I think Mr Good And Evil is getting better all the time and he has real speed so I could see him ending up an open class horse. "But the way Sundees Son went last Friday he is going to be really hard to beat, so it might come down to manners." As for the new season, Wallis says she and Hackett are looking to maintain around 20 horses but are also hoping Monte (saddle trots) get tote status in New Zealand, at least as a starting point. "I think they can add something different to some meetings and we have found they help some horses re-focus and come back better for normal races after we have given then a Monte trial or non-tote. "So I'd love to see them given a chance."   Michael Guerin

Four harness racing meetings are programmed in again this week and with a few of our regular trainers and drivers away on holiday the ringaround list may end up being smaller than usual for the next few weeks. The Forbury Park Trotting Club start proceedings tonight hosting their last meeting of this season. (5th August is the first Forbury meeting in the new season) Addington and Alexandra Park host meetings tomorrow night, then the weekend harness racing heads to Rangiora on Sunday. Last week the biggest winning dividend in the ringaround selections went to Todd Macfarlane who thought Cyclone Banner was his best chance at Alexandra Park last Friday. Cyclone Banner did win and paid $8.70 and $3.00 on the tote.  The TAB are running $50,000 terminating pick six Jackpots every Thursday and Friday for the month of July.   Note: We will keep adding to this page if more tips come in after the deadline, so check back often   Forbury on Thursday night Brad Williamson - Brad thinks his best drive this week could be Taieri Miss  at Forbury in Race 1 Geoff Knight - Geoff says Armstrong would be his best chance this week at Forbury in Race 2 Blair Orange - Blair is also going for Armstrong as his best drive this week at Forbury in Race 2 Matthew Williamson - Matthew thinks that Bush Man might be his best drive this week in Race 4 Nathan Williamson - Nathan says his best drive might be Notaword at Forbury also in Race 4 Shane Walkinshaw - Shane says his best drive is probably Franco Huntington at Forbury in Race 8 Rory Mcllwrick - Rory is going for Ferritts Sister as his best drive this week at Forbury in Race 9   Albion Park (Australia) on Friday night Mark Jones - Mark thinks his best chance this week would be in Australia with Tres Vite in Race 4   Auckland on Friday night Todd Macfarlane - Todd says his best chance is probably Seize The Moment at Alexandra Park in Race 1 Tony Herlihy - Tony thought that Mo Casino would be a good chance at Auckland in Race 6 Jay Abernethy - Jay is going for Brookes Belle as his best chance at Alexandra Park this week in Race 7   Addington on Friday night Stephen Richardson (Odds Analyst) - Stephen thinks that Deborahs Gem can go close to winning Race 2 Terry Chmiel - Terry says his best drive could be Peggy Nova at Addington in Race 5 John Curtin - John thinks Majestic Moment would be a good winning chance at Addington in Race 7   Rangiora on Sunday Racechat - Lance thinks that Zippidy Doodah is a good winning chance at Rangiora in Race 2 John Morrison - John is going for Agatha Tyrone as his best drive this week at Rangiora in Race 6 Harnesslink Reporter - says Trailer Park Girl  can go close to winning at Rangiora in Race 7   Harnesslink Media

Trainer Greg Hope is 100 per cent confident champion trotter Monbet will make it back to the races this year even though it has been over 20 months since he has graced the track. The rising seven-year-old hasn’t raced since a national record win in the Dominion at Addington on November 11, 2016, missing most of that season and the entire of  this one. Monbet has actually had two preparations since that stunning win but has failed to stand up to training on both occasions with the pin being pulled on this season when he was just a week away from racing. But Hope says the 2016 Horse of the Year could have actually raced this season and probably would have had he been a normal horse. “He had knee issues and being such a great horse we didn’t want to take any chances with him,” he explains. “He has had stem cell injections there, two courses, and he is as sound as he can be at the moment. “Things can always go wrong with horses but at this stage, unless something else comes up, I am sure we will get him back to the races. “Then it will be a matter of getting him back to his best and that could take a little longer because he has been away from racing for such a long time. “The temptation will be there to have him ready to go in his very first start back but I don’t think we can expect that. “I don’t want to put that level of pressure on him in training so I’d rather get him ready to race and let him come to peak through racing.” Monbet is likely to trial mid-September with races like the Flying Mile at Ashburton in October obvious aims as he heads toward another New Zealand Cup meeting. After that Hope and wife Nina will have a big decision to make, whether to test Monbet’s troublesome legs out at the Inter Dominions in Victoria in December as the trotting series is reborn.  With this season’s open class trotting ranks having seen no dominant trotter emerge, if Monbet can return to his best he would almost certainly be the best trotter in Australasia again, which makes the $17 some bookies are quoting for the Inter Dominions tempting to some. One key rival Monbet won’t have to worry about should be make it to either the NZ Cup carnival or Inter Dominions is stablemate Enghien. The four-year-old is one of the best open class prospects in the country but Hope says he is on an extended break and may not race until coming north in December. But the horse who has emerged as Enghien’s arch rival, Habibi Inta, will be up and racing well before then. Trainer Paul Nairn says the enormously-improved Jewels winner will be back and ready to race in the traditional major spring trots heading into the NZ Cup carnival. “He had a very good end to his last campaign and I think his manners will take him a long way in open class,” said Nairn. “So you could even see him in the early trots, races like the Banks Peninsula Trotting Cup.  But the outlook is not so positive for Habibi Inta’s older sister Habibti Ivy, a former Rowe Cup runner-up who hasn’t raced since finishing second in the Flying Mile at Ashburton last October.  “While nothing is confirmed yet I don’t think she will make it back to the track and she will probably be retired to stud,” said Nairn.  That would still leave the master trainer with former Jewels winner Wilma’s Mate and Ronald J in his open class team to take on Monbet and the likes of Great Things Happen this spring. Monbet Record: 34 starts, 23 wins, five placings. Earnings: $770,714 Highlights: Rowe Cup, Dominion, Anzac Cup, National Trot, 4-y-o Jewels, NZ Free-For-All (twice), Australasian Trotting Champs. Honours: 2015-16 Horse of the Year, three national records. Michael Guerin

Hayden Cullen a horseman of talent and wide experience will start work at All Stars on Monday as a senior stablehand. Hayden spent more than a dozen years working with Brent Mangos from 2002 and for the last period was a training partner during the Bettor Cover Lover era. He then switched to thoroughbreds for a time at Windsor Park Stud before returning to his first love. Hayden holds the unusual distinction of owning a Breeder's Crown winner, Tuhimata Glass who won the 2yo Trotting Final at the 2009 BC meeting in the hands of Tony Herlihy. Officially trained by Brent, Hayden had leased the youngster with an $8000 right of purchase from Steve Cornwall and later sold two small shares in the horse. He has driven over 70 winners in a light driving career. Hayden arrived south this week and will later be joined by his partner Amanda who will also be associated with the stable.    Courtesy of All Stars Website http://www.allstarsracingstables.com/

As reported by the New Zealand Herald, the most important report in New Zealand racing's recent history is on target to be delivered to Minister for Racing Winston Peters by the end of the month. And the man charged with making recommendations which could be crucial to the future of the racing industry says he has concentrated mainly on the thoroughbred industry. Australian racing supremo John Messara was asked by Peters to write a strategic report to provide advice to the Government on how to fix racing's woes. Peters said the Messara review would assist the government in determining if the Racing Act and the proposed Racing Amendment Bill, elements of which should provide New Zealand racing with millions of dollars of extra overseas turnover income, are fit for purpose. Messara says his report is just weeks away and should be in Peters' hands by the target date of the end of the racing season, July 31. "I am confident of meeting that deadline and while we haven't finished compiling the report yet it will be around 50-60 pages, maybe more," Messara told the Herald. The NSW-based racing administrator estimates he has spent between two and three weeks on the ground in New Zealand since being asked to look into the industry here and has met with the heads of all three codes and New Zealand Racing Board boss John Allen. "I have been over there three times and met with a lot of people while we have also had submissions from a wide range of people in the industry." But while the report could have a huge impact on the way New Zealand's racing industry is run for decades to come, Messara says he has concentrated more on the thoroughbred code than harness racing or greyhounds because that is what he was asked to do. "But I am not going to get into the specifics of the report or the discussions I have had," says Messara. "I will be happy to talk about those after it has been released but I will deliver it to the Minister and it will be up to him to release it." Messara being asked to concentrate on fixes for the thoroughbred industry is no surprise on two fronts. Firstly, it is the one of the three racing codes in New Zealand that has fallen the furthest behind its Australian equivalent in terms of stake money and infrastructure, particularly New South Wales racing, which Messara was at the head of for part of a booming financial resurgence over the last decade. And secondly it was serious players in the thoroughbred industry, like Sir Patrick Hogan, who were among the most vocal Peters supporters before last year's election, with some inside the racing industry reportedly voting for New Zealand First for that reason alone. Messara says while thoroughbred racing will be at the centre of his report the harness and greyhound codes should not see that as a negative. "I think a stronger thoroughbred industry would be good for New Zealand racing of all codes," he said. Messara's suggested strategies around how to increase stakes, pay for much-needed track maintenance, potential venue closures and even the building of New Zealand's first all-weather track, if as expected they are covered by the review, will be eagerly anticipated. But perhaps the most important question being asked by those at the head of all three racing codes is what will the report suggest about the future role of the New Zealand Racing Board. There is a strong push, particularly from some of the thoroughbred code's leaders, for NZRB's core duties to be outsourced, with its betting operations an obvious target, and with overseas suitors keen to tender for that role. It would be surprising if Messara's report didn't cover that outsourcing or licensing of an overseas operator to run betting on New Zealand racing but that could require changes to the Racing Act which could be hard to get passed. Reducing the number of racing venues in New Zealand also looks certain to be recommended but again that will be met with considerable resistance in some regions. So while the report is near completion, the debates must just be getting ready to intensify. Crunch time • Australian expert John Messara is set to deliver his strategic review of New Zealand racing at the end of the month. • He says it concentrates primarily on the thoroughbred code because that is what he was asked to do. • The most anticipated part of the report will be Messara's recommendations around the role of the New Zealand Racing Board. • The report, which will be at least 50 pages, will be delivered to Minister for Racing, Winston Peters.   Michael Guerin

2015 world champion driver Dexter Dunn has this morning confirmed he will drive at Saturday’s $500,000 UBET Blacks A Fake meeting at Albion Park. Dunn, who has driven more than 2000 winners in his decorated career, will guide either My Field Marshal or Let It Ride in the Group 1 UBET Blacks A Fake for trainer Tim Butt. He has also been invited to take part in the $20,000 Driver’s Invitation Race. Dunn won the 2015 World Driving Championship in record-breaking fashion. He scored an unprecedented 200 points across 20 heats, more than 50 points ahead of his nearest rival. Dunn is no stranger to the Albion Park circuit, with his most recent visit coming in 2017 when he guided My Field Marshal to finish second behind Hectorjayjay in the G2 Sunshine Sprint.  His recent successes at 'The Creek' include a 2016 Queensland Oaks with Nek Time.    Racing Queensland

Christen Me N, Nike Franco N, Kept Under Wraps A, Anythingforlove A, Sky Major N, Lazarus N, among many other champions who raced in Australia and or New Zealand before making their way to North America. Aside from their gifts of gait speed and racing racing ability they also brought with them an incredible power,  they united two harness racing industries in two hemispheres. I am have been fortunate to see some of these now North American harness racing champions and sit along the rail to watch them race. I am always captivated by their racing ability. I have even had the chance to meet a few of them up and I am always a little star-struck when I do. I find it inspiring how people have been brought together because of these horses. I wonder if in adjusting to a new climate, new people and new routines if these champions realize how they have positively impacted the global harness racing industry? Personally, I have made new friends and made existing friendships stronger because of these champions. Here are my stories on some of the former  “Down Under” champions, racing in North America and the amazing friendships I made because of them. He was known as the “the Prince” when he faced Terror To Love, at tracks across his native New Zealand. Chances are you do not who I am talking about, unless you are involved in New Zealand racing or are like me and follow it. But, in the barn and with those that knew him best, he was “CC”. When the news broke that Christen Me N would be coming to race in the United States, I have to admit I was both thrilled and disappointed.  I have a soft spot for Christen Me N because he was the first New Zealand bred horse I took an interest in after I met his former driver Dexter Dunn in Ireland in 2016. I was thrilled because this meant I would have the opportunity to watch him race, but I also knew that he would be greatly missed by many in New Zealand. Then, I remembered that him coming to the North America meant friendships would be created and that was a good thing. He would be showcasing the very best of New Zealand racing talent, in the place some argue is the pinnacle of harness racing- the United States of America. Upon arrival in the United States, Christen Me N was placed in the care of Jim King Jr. and Joann Looney -King. I looked forward to the day that I would get to meet the famous “C.C”. One day in early summer of 2017, I got my opportunity because he was entered to race at what was at that time Mohawk Racetrack .That afternoon, I stopped by the farm where the King’s were stabling to see him in addition to some other horses they had racing in Ontario. As I arrived, Christen Me N was coming in from the paddock. He was so regal, standing there in the warmth of the sunshine while I admired him. I was at a loss for words and he looked like he knew what I was feeling. I got a little closer and he bowed his head, allowing me to stroke his face, and give him a kiss. Meeting him is an experience I will remember and cherish. That night he raced at what is now Woodbine- Mohawk Park, and of course I cheered. However, I was cheering him on for his fans in the southern hemisphere too. He unfortunately did not win that night, but just to be able watch him race live was a thrill for me.  When I posted the pictures from our visit and of him racing the following day; my social media buzzed. I received comments about how he was doing and how his race went and a few friend requests from people in New Zealand. The photos were also shared by people in New Zealand. Knowing that the small gesture of posting a few pictures meant a great deal to so many people warmed my heart. Next is my story of the horse who inspired this story- Nike Franco N. Nike Franco N is also is the care of Joann and Jim King Jr. I first met her on that same visit that I met ¨C.C” and she also raced on that same night. When she began racing in North America, a person by the name of Amanda Grieve was always tagged in many posts on Twitter (tweets) about Nike Franco N. So, after I met Nike Franco and posted the pictures of us, I decided to send her a message and find out she loved this mare. It turned that when Nike Franco N raced in Australia, Amanda was the caretaker for top mare and trained her for a period of time too.  Now Amanda and I talk every couple of weeks.Our friendship is all thanks to Nike Franco N. If it was not Nike Franco N being sold to American interests there is a very good chance that Amanda and I never would have met.  Earlier this season, when Nike Franco N raced in Canada in the Roses Are Red elimination and final, I video chatted with Amanda from the rail at Woodbine- Mohawk Park and I turned the camera so she could see the race, even though she lives on the other side of the world we were both cheering on Nike Franco N who she affectionately calls “Darling”.  It was truly a special opportunity for me and one I will cherish forever. In a recent conversation with Amanda,  she said something that tugged at my heartstrings and I felt was fitting for the sentiment of this very story. She said, “You get very attached to them. Especially working with them every day. And travelling with them too. Yes, I do miss her. But, I am still watching her race now.”  I can sympathize with how she feels, I would feel the same it was a horse I cared about. But, that is the great thing about social media. Nike Franco N may be across the Pacific [ocean], but the two of them are still connected through people in North America. Amanda is able to stay updated on Nike Franco N’s racing career and receive pictures is because of the friendships that Nike Franco N racing in North America has prompted. The horses that have crossed the Equator that I have also made friendships that I had before their move much stronger. Sired by Bettors Delight and foaled in 2011, Kept Under Wraps A was voted the two-year-old of the year for the state of Victoria. My friend Marcus Kirkwood owned a part of him, before Kept Under Wraps A was sold to North American interests.  I became friends with Marcus through Twitter, and when I went to Australia in February of 2017, we met in person. So, now that Kept Under Wraps A in racing in the United States, I periodically check the entries and results pages on the United States Trotting Association website to see how he is doing and then I send Marcus a message with an update. Anythingforlove A (spelled Anything For Love when racing in Australia) was bred by my friend Paul Humphreys. We became friends through social media and I also met him when I went to Australia in 2017.  When the horse had his first couple of starts in the United States, Paul and I messaged back and forth. I remember watching the race on my laptop. It was neat to be able to say “I know who bred that horse”. Anythingforlove gave us one more thing to talk about.  The story of how I got to meet Sky Major N is unique. My dad was talking with the trainer of Sky Major N, Duane Marfisi, and he it came up in conversation where he happened to be stabled, turns out we were at the same training center. When my dad told me I was elated. My filly, a future champion, was stabled steps away from a former New Zealand champion. Trevor Casey owns Sky Major N. I talk with his partner Kate Marriott often. I truly consider her a friend. During my visits with Sky Major N I gave him treats and kisses and my mom would take pictures. When I returned home I always sent Kate the pictures as soon as I could and told all about our visit.  Similarly, Trevor Casey also owned a share of the world-renowned champion, Lazarus N. Now that Lazarus N is in the United States being trained by Jimmy Takter, I send Kate all of the news and pictures I see of Lazarus. It always makes my day to send her updates of both of these champions. Every time the name of an overseas champion is printed in a North American [racing] program or their name graces a headline an “N” or an “A” is placed after their name to symbolize to everyone reading the program or the article they mentions them,  this horse is from Australia or New Zealand. I think of it as a symbol of pride.That extra letter also symbolizes the countless hours of care, hard work and dedication that the team of people looked after them in Australia or New Zealand put in that made them into the champion that now races in North America. I will forever be grateful for the friendships I have gained because of these horses. They have added so much joy to my life. I also look forward to creating many more friendships through these horses in the future. To everyone who has ever loved, taken care of, trained, owned or driven one of these now North American champions, thank you. Thank you for making these champions who they are. Without you they would not have broken the records they did, had the jaw-dropping victories they did. In addition, thank you for sharing your your champions with us here in North America. You will always be a part of who they are, no matter where in the world they race. To everyone in North America who has a horse who previously raced in Australia and New Zealand, know that these horses are extra special. I encourage you to find out who the connections were when the horse raced in Australia and or New Zealand and connect with them, if you have not already. I hope through these dual hemisphere champions you will make friendships like I have. These champions that have etched their names into greatness in both hemispheres make the big world seem a little smaller by bringing people together who are passionate about the same sport, but are oceans apart that is the power of these dual hemisphere champions. Sydney Weaver is 18 years old and resides in Acton, Ontario, Canada. She has been involved with harness racing for years, groom's horses, jogs them on the track, owns both a Standardbred and a Thoroughbred racehorse and has already won major youth writing awards. Sydney also has Cerebral Palsy and spends most of her time in a wheelchair, but has never let her disability hold her back from achieving her goals. She will be attending Carleton University this fall in their Communications and Media Studies Honors Program. Footnote: Since I began writing this piece, Christen Me N, “C.C.” is no longer in the care of the Jim King Jr. and Joann Looney-King, he is now with other caring connections.

When Lazarus stepped foot upon American soil at the start of June this year it officially began the next leg of the great pacer’s remarkable journey. It was also the beginning of a growing hype from the North American and international harness racing media. Since arriving at Jimmy Takter’s East Windsor Farm in New Jersey, the enquiries have been constant. The reputation and expectation that preceded his arrival would put pressure on any trainer. But his new trainer seems extremely calm about it all. With 45 starts, 35 wins, 9 placings (he was only once out of the top three) and $3.8 million (NZ)  in earnings, Lazarus has already won two editions of his home country’s most prestigious race, the New Zealand Cup, and a staggering 15 Group One races in Australasia. But his ultimate challenge still lies ahead of him. Lazarus has been purchased by Taylor Made Stallions, who up until last year have been thoroughbred stallion owners, and are based in Kentucky. One of four brothers who own Taylor Made Stallions, Duncan Taylor grew up in the Standardbred game and decided that branching back out into the harness racing world would be a sentimental move and also a lucrative opportunity for their company. His new trainer, US Hall of Fame inductee Jimmy Takter, is a Swedish native that has tasted success at the very highest level in Europe and North America. Takter trained Elitlopp winner Moni Maker and also the world’s fastest pacer, Always B Miki, and he now has his sights set on translating Lazarus into an international star. “My main goal with Lazarus is the Breeders Crown in October,” says Takter. “He has been working very well here, last week he paced a mile at home in 1.56 and did it very handily.” “I intend to go a bit quicker with him this week but I am very pleased with him. You can tell he’s a legend.” The horse has recovered from his trip and has adapted well coming from winter to spring reported Takter. “He’s been tremendous so far. There is a lot of stress that is put on a horse coming to this hemisphere. Different food, different environment, but my farm is very quiet and relaxing.” “He arrived looking great but with a little winter coat. His body was a bit confused so it took a little bit for him to adapt.  In the last two weeks I would say he has really blossomed and he is starting to look really good now.” For Takter the weight of expectation from the international racing community is nothing new, and he thrives on the challenge. “It’s not intimidating for me. I don’t want to sound arrogant, but I took on Moni Maker years ago and that was the best decision I ever made,” laughed Takter. “I like the idea of taking on great horses. That’s what we work for right?” “A lot of people are asking about the horse at the moment, hopefully we are able to live up to the expectation.” Since joining the team Lazarus has made a unique impression on Takter. Who fondly refers to the horse’s characteristics during his work. “He’s got personality, he’s very cool. We train him on the straight track with a team of eight horses and he is very vocal,” he said. “He screams the whole way. He’s a funny horse.” The biggest challenge in adapting to the racing style in North America Takter feels is gate speed. “I know his racing style at home is varied and over different distances, but up here you have to have gate speed. That will be the biggest thing he will need to have to make it here but it feels like he has it. I don’t think it will be a problem.” Takter knows you can’t compare Champions from different hemispheres against each other. “I have been asked if Lazarus compares to Miki (Always B Miki) and I don’t think you can really put them up against each other. They are such unique horses.” “And that is not to put Lazarus down of course. It’s just hard to compare at this stage.” “Lazarus is more laid back and more humble. And Miki was more stallion-like. But I was so proud to be associated with that horse and the world record.” The next task will be to find a suitable catch driver for the Down Under wonder. “We don’t know who will drive him yet,” admitted Takter. “Yannick Gingras does a lot of driving for me and I think the horse would fit Yannick’s style.” “I’m not one hundred percent sure but the owners are great people and basically leave it up to me to make the best decision for the horse which I appreciate.” So what would Takter deem as a success in North America for Lazarus? “Pocono Downs is not a track where you can go under 1.46. But if he does win the Breeders Crown this horse will go down as one of the greatest of all time, not only in the Southern Hemisphere but in the Northern Hemisphere as well.” But to even get to the Crown the horse will need to trial and show he’s ready for it. Lazarus will attempt to qualify at the Meadowlands in four weeks’ time, coinciding with the close of the Meadowland racing season and their Hambletonian Day meet. “I hope we can accomplish success at the highest level,” said Takter. “I am very happy to have this horse.” “We all know how difficult it is for horses to travel and keep at their peak form.”   by Jess Smith, for Harness Racing New Zealand

When news broke of the sale of harness racing's New Zealand Champion Pacer Lazarus to North American interests in May of this year, one of the biggest questions from his army of fans was who will take on the responsibility of training the great horse. After all, Lazarus had amassed an impeccable record already for New Zealand trainers Mark Purdon and Natalie Rasmussen. With 45 starts, 35 wins, 9 placings (he was only once out of the top three) and $3.8million in earnings, Lazarus had already won two editions of the country’s most prestigious race, the New Zealand Cup, and a staggering 15 Group One races in Australasia. He had won everything from standing start two mile staying tests in his New Zealand Cups, in which he set the record for the fastest ever time paced over the distance, to a scintillating mile mobile victory when he won the Chariots of Fire in 1.49, in New South Wales. And whilst the New Zealand bred horses currently dominate the North American open class ranks with three of the top seven earners Kiwi exports – Shartin (the richest overall pacer in the US this year to date), Bit Of A Legend and Sell A Bit – the road to glory for New Zealand standardbreds abroad has not always been easy. Adapting from the varied style of racing in New Zealand where race distances can be anything from one to two miles, stand or mobile starts or on grass or all weather tracks, our horses can sometimes find the transition to racing hard and fast miles at every start a steep learning curve. There have of course been great New Zealand pacers who have flown the flag boldly in previous eras – the great Cardigan Bay of course was the first Standardbred to earn one million dollars and he hit that mark in the United States. So famous and adored by the public he featured on The Ed Sullivan Show following his record setting achievement. In more recent years Bit Of A Legend has also gathered a legion of fans in North America. After leaving New Zealand at age six with 20 wins to his name, Bit Of A Legend has gone on to win feature races in the US and Canada collecting a further 24 wins and taking his earnings $2.2million in the past three years. For Lazarus, the man tasked with guiding him through the next chapter of his journey is New Jersey based trainer, Jimmy Takter. And if he can produce success with Lazarus it will complete one of the most unique and historic training trifectas in harness racing history. He’s trained the world’s richest trotter, the world’s fastest pacer and now has his sights set on converting a down under champion into the world’s next star. But time is not a luxury he has.   Born in Sweden, Takter is the son of a Swedish harness racing trainer and originally started his career as a driver. His father sent Jimmy to the USA when he was a teenager to learn more about the harness racing trade, and as soon as he set foot in the States Jimmy knew he had found his future home. “I feel like I fit in here,” Takter explained. “When I arrived I just fell in love with the place.” So after returning home briefly to marry his childhood sweetheart Christina, he returned to the United States with his young family in 1982 to pursue his North American dream. What followed would be such a successful and versatile career that it would lead to Takter being named a six time Trainer of the Year, and was then inducted into the US Harness Racing Hall of Fame in 2012. He is ranked the second most successful trainer in history in the United States based on prizemoney, second only to Ron Burke, with a whopping $122 million in stakes to his name. Takter developed many top trotters in the 90’s including Hambletonian and Breeders Crown winner Malabar Man. He then hit international headlines when he trained and drove trotting champion mare Moni Maker to win the Elitlopp in his homeland in 1998. She went on to finish second in that great race in 1999 and won the Prix d’Amerique in France in ‘99 also. The grand mare was twice named US Horse of the Year and was three time Trotter of the Year. At the time of her retirement in the year 2000 she was the richest Standardbred racehorse, and richest mare of any breed, with $5.5million in earnings. It would have been easy for Takter to stick with what he knew best, after all he grew up around trotters and was picking up success in the biggest trotting races on the world stage, however Takter’s next move would see him lift his training game to a whole new level. Noted for his dedicated attention to detail and his drive to keep learning and improving, Takter turned his attention to also purchasing and training pacers. A foreign concept to him as in his homeland of Sweden they only race trotters. He adapted to training them with emphatic fashion, with success with Mr Feelgood in the 2006 Little Brown Jug when winning his two heats in an all age, combined time record. Then in 2010 and 2011 he produced the outstanding pacing filly See You At Peelers to win her first 22 starts in a row, capturing the imagination of harness racing fans worldwide. But it would be in 2015 that Jimmy Takter would start to showcase his greatest pacing training achievement when the then four-year-old Always B Miki would enter his stable doors. Always B Miki arrived with four screws in his left hind pastern after a dramatic accident saw the stallion kick the wall of his stall just minutes before his Breeders Crown final. The horse was late scratched after being found to be lame in the warm up. Takter had the horse recover and resume training with him, only to injure the opposite hind leg. It was back to the drawing board and would be a further five months until Always B Miki would resume. It was worth the wait. Remarkably after facing all of the adversity in previous months, the horse went on to win all four of his starts that season, all in 1.49.4 or better. Takter proclaimed that the horse would make a big impact on the sport the following year, if he was able to keep him healthy and sound. And he was correct. On October 9 2016 Always B Miki changed harness racing history when he and regular driver, David Miller, paced the fastest ever mile in 1.46.0. The duo led throughout at the Red Mile in Lexington in the Allerage Farms Open Pace, and as Miller reeled off the opening sectionals the atmosphere on course became electric. There had been much hype about the horse being able to break the barrier set previously by Somebeachsomewhere, He’s Watching, Warrawee Needy and Holborn Hanover of 1.46.4 in race conditions – and to all present they had a sense that this could be the day. When Miki and Miller hit the three-quarter mile in 1.19.4 race announcer Sam McKee lifted to another level, and so did the horse. As the post loomed fans watched the clock and held their breath as the final time was announced. “Always B Miki – in 1.46!” McKee screams.  The crowd erupted into a standing ovation. The performance has set the new benchmark for greatness in the sport, and the occasion almost proved too much for Takter. “I was so nervous before the race and I never get nervous like that, but I was,” he revealed. “He was scared of shadows and he didn’t warm up well.” In his career Takter has trained four Horse of the Year title recipients, Always B Miki was his first pacer to win this. With Always B Miki retired a new challenge would soon arise. Following the purchase of Lazarus by Taylor Made Stallions of Kentucky, Takter was approached to take on the role of trainer for the five-year-old stallion. And even though he would be a long way from New Zealand, Lazarus will feel right at home in his new stable in East Windsor, New Jersey. The Takter property is one of the most immaculate you will ever see. The driveway is adorned by the American Flag and features a pond with its own seven foot Statue of Liberty. Set up in a similar style to the Purdon and Rasmussen training complex, the 40 hectare farm offers a stunning barn facility with walker, equine treadmill, a 1200m straight line training track, two mile jog track, a 1000m training track and is based beside a 75 hectare Horse Park.  Takter likes to utilize this and take his team through the park to mix up the workload and keep their minds fresh and active. Whilst Takter is at the top of his game, with one of the most enviable training complexes and training records in the world, it will all be over for him soon. In a shock announcement late last year, Takter indicated that in 2019 he will step down from training duties, and hand over the reins to his daughter Nancy and his trusted stable foreman, Per Engblom. They will train from Takter’s farm and he will still live on site and be available to offer assistance and advice, but is determined to step back and take some time for himself and his family. Takter has been open about the pressure he puts on himself to be at the top of his game. He can be extremely critical on himself and strives for perfection. “A sign of a good trainer is one that stays on top for many years,” he said. “I want to be on top, but I can’t all the time. It’s been 35 years of doing this and it’s hard. I get depression very easily and I get down on myself.” “You work yourself to death here,” admitted Takter. “I just feel like if I can’t be one hundred percent into it I don’t want to do it. But it is hard to back off.” “At this stage of my career Lazarus is actually a big plus. It is horses like this that make me remember why I wanted to be in harness racing. A horse like this is very special for me to be participating with.” It’s a brutally honest and admirable revelation from one of the greatest trainers in the sport. Highlighting once again the level of pressure that being the best presents. “I haven’t decided if I will totally stay out of the industry. But I need to take some time for myself and then make a decision. I would love to come down to New Zealand and maybe have a drive as it’s on my bucket list.” Latest reports from Takter have been positive about Lazarus and how he has settled into life at the Takter Stable. He has adapted to his new surroundings effortlessly, and has been complimented on his wonderful temperament and attitude towards his work. “He’s a cool horse. I’m very happy with him, you can see he is a legend,” said Takter. There has been talk about a potential start at the Red Mile in Kentucky in September, and also the Breeders Crown at Pocono Downs in October. But nothing will be set in stone until Takter is one hundred percent happy with Lazarus and his progress. “My main goal is the Breeders Crown at Pocono for him. If I accomplish that it will be the icing on the cake,” stated Takter. So whilst many focus on the great horse himself, and rightly so, there is also a human element to this intriguing endeavor.  Lazarus could allow Takter a fairytale swansong to his career; the Hall of Fame trainer, who ventured away from his homeland to chase the American dream, retiring at the top of his game and potentially signing off by producing one of the most unique training triple crowns.  The world’s richest trotter, the world’s fastest pacer and transforming a national hero from a different hemisphere into an international icon.  by Jess Smith, for Harness Racing New Zealand    

The 2018 McMillan Equine Feeds NZ Junior Driver Champion has been found. Congratulations to Alicia Harrison who finished the Championship on 49 points after continuing her winning streak by taking out Heat 3 on Queen Of Glory, and securing the  Championship with a mid placing in the last and final heat. Second placing was taken out by Benjamin Butcher and third place went to Mark Hurrell.  The championship was hard fought throughout all four heats but after Alicia got off to an early lead, she was always the one to beat. “It’s been a real privilege, and I’m extremely grateful for this opportunity,” said Harrison. The Inter-Island competition was won by Team North, team captain Benjamin Butcher is pleased to have the trophy back in the North. “It’s good to have it coming home” said Butcher. We would like to thank all the trainers and owners who supported this series and also to our sponsor Mcmillan Equine Feeds. Please see the full final standings below:   Final Points      Alicia Harrison                   49 Benjamin Butcher             46 Mark Hurrell                      39 Matt Anderson                  34 Luke Whittaker                  29 Dylan Ferguson                 27 Jack MacKinnon                26 Tony Cameron                   26 Ben Hope                            25 Kimberley Butt                  18 John Morrison                   17 Sheree Tomlinson             12                                                   North Island                     203 South Island                     145     Courtney Clarke Marketing and Communications Executive | Harness Racing New Zealand Inc

« Article Archive
USA
Canada
Australia
New Zealand
Europe
Loader
Loader
Loader
Tim Butt knows a thing or two about preparing a Grand Circuit winner. The champion horseman has prepared more Grand Circuit winners than any other trainer in this part of the world….and by a good margin! His tally now stands at 52 (17 pacing & 35 trotting events). And his latest winner came via the final leg of the 2017/18 Australian Pacing Gold Grand Circuit season, the Gr.1 $200,540 UBET Blacks A Fake Queensland Championship at Albion Park tonight (Saturday). Rising star Let It Ride ($4.30) confirmed his status as a genuine star of the future with a brilliant and resounding victory in the 2680m feature event when easily defeating Atomic Red ($3.90 fav) and Alleluia ($32.60) in a track record time of 1:54.8 (Our Hi Jinx held previous mark at 1:55.0). Handled by star reinsman Dexter Dunn who overcame an illness the night prior, the recent Gr.1 Breeders Challenge winner was given a perfect run in behind the pace setting Atomic Red before racing clear soon after straightening. With Glenferrie Hood and Tact Tate both leaving the gate with urgency, Dunn bided his time before charging forward quickly to take the lead away from Glenferrie Hood at the 2000m mark. The winning move came shortly after when Dunn elected to take cover behind the hard-running Atomic Red. The lead time was covered in 74.9 seconds. Atomic Red led the way from Ultimate Art who improved his position quickly while Let It Ride sat perfectly in the trail. The first half of the final mile was covered in 29.2 and 29.4 seconds. Entering the back straight, Atomic Red led from Ultimate Art and Let It Ride while Cruz Bromac improved three-wide solo with My Field Marshal catching his cover. Cruz Bromac raced roughly mid-way down the back straight and checked My Field Marshal while Carlas Pixel and Ohoka Punter also copped interference. The third quarter was covered in 28.9 seconds. At the top of the home straight, Atomic Red attempted to kick away but Let It Ride quickly loomed to his outside and the put the result beyond doubt very quickly. The winning margin was a widening 13.5m over Atomic Red while there was a further 4.5m back to Alleluia in third. The final quarter was timed in 28.7 seconds. “We got a perfect trip and got lucky to follow the right horse throughout, he took us right to the home straight and I knew my guy was feeling great in the pocket and he quickened nicely over the latter part.” Dunn said. For Dunn, it was his 7th Grand Circuit victory. Again, the management of Butt was pinpoint accurate following his decision earlier this week to bypass the original target of the 4yo Championship (support feature) and concentrate on the main event coupled with flying Dunn in from New Zealand to partner the gelding. At the time, it was a big gamble but one that has paid handsome dividends. It was first test against genuine open class rivals. Let It Ride has now won 15 of his 27 starts. Connections will now switch their focus towards the Inter Dominion series in Melbourne later this year. The 2017/18 Australian Pacing Gold Grand Circuit season is now complete with global superstar Lazarus set to be crowned champion after amassing 304 points throughout the term. Lazarus finished well clear of Soho Tribeca (205) and Tiger Tara (145). Chris Barsby
A promising harness racing driver with previous form for abuse has pled guilty to misconduct after abusing two female drivers. Bronson Munro was banned from rugby for 46 weeks in 2016 over a racial insult towards a Fijian rugby player in a high-level Canterbury country game. He found himself again in strife over an incident at a junior drivers' event at Forbury Park, Dunedin, on June 15. Munro was charged with misconduct for using foul language against Charlotte Purvis and Sheree Tomlinson during and after Race 8, in which he believed his horse should have been given the lead by the female drivers. Read the full story here Article by Martin van Beynen Reprinted with permission of Stuff
Chase Auckland may have has lost two weeks out of his NZ Cup preparation with a minor injury but that is by no means the end of the penny section as the Aussies say. "It's a muscle thing, something he has just nicked in  the paddock and is nothing serious" Natalie said "We have put him on ultrasound treatment and we expect that it will be all cleared up in two weeks tops" "If that is the way it works out it doesn't threaten a Cup preparation but any longer and it could be a problem from that point of view. But I doubt it will take any longer than that and probably not that long" Chase Auckland returned to the stable recently to begin his new preparation which is not guaranteed to end in a NZ Cup attempt anyway. With all the rich four year old features on both sides of the Tasman through the spring and summer it is being viewed as an option in a perfect scenario but nothing beyond that at this stage.    Courtesy of All Stars Website
Leading reinsman Blair Orange has produced the greatest season by a New Zealand harness racing driver, officially breaking new ground with win number 230 at Addington last night. Going into last night Orange still needed three wins to tie the old mark of 229 wins in a season, set by Dexter Dunn in last years premiership.  In the end it was a cakewalk for Orange who finished up winning four races at the New Zealand Metropolitan trotting club racenight and he could be considered unlucky not to win a fifth when beaten a nose into second driving Sharnae in Race 6 for trainer Brad Mowbray.  Orange won the first of his four win bag in Race 5, leading all the way with in form trotter Flyinova who was backing up from a win at Ashburton last weekend. The Jeff Wheeler trained trotter always had the field covered in front and was simply too good for his opposition over the extreme distance of 3200m. His next win came in heat three of the South Of The Waitaki series when Whata Razzle Dazzle sprinted home in 55.8 seconds for his last 800m to grab a deserved win. Blair then equaled the record 229 wins with another front running display on trotter Idle Moose, who won Race 9 convincingly after being very unlucky in his previous start when getting carted back on the turn. It was only fitting that he broke the record driving the winner of Race 10 as well, getting home on a relative outsider in All Nuts And Bolts for his good friend David Pearce,who trains the Bettor's Delight gelding at his West Melton stables. With another week still left in the season, Orange looks sure to build on that total and set a mark that will be very hard to break in years to come.   Harnesslink Media
Loader

Additional Articles