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RWWA Stewards have been advised by the ChemCentre in Perth, that cobalt at a concentration in excess of 100 micrograms per litre, being the threshold prescribed in the Harness Rules of Racing, has been detected in a urine sample taken from ARTURUS NZ at Gloucester Park on 15 November 2017 prior to it completing and finishing fourth in Race 9. This finding has been verified by the Racing Analytical Services Laboratory (RASL) in Victoria. Accordingly, the Stewards will inquire into these reports on a date to be fixed which the Trainer of ARTURUS NZ, Mr Gary Elson has been requested to attend. Acting under the provisions of Harness Rule of Racing 183(d) Stewards have directed that Mr Elson’s licence to train be suspended forthwith pending the outcome of the Stewards inquiry to the extent that he is not permitted to nominate or present any horses to race. Harness – Stewards Inquiry – Trainer Mr Gary Elson – ARTURUS NZ Denis Borovica – General Manager Racing Integrity Ph: 9445 5427 Denis.borovica@rwwa.com.au

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today considered charges issued against licensed trainer-driver Paul Grech under Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 190(1) and 190B(1). Charge 1 – AHRR 190(1) reads as follows: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances    This charge related to a post-race urine sample collected from the horse ‘Mister Oz’ after it placed 2nd in Race 1, the ‘Hargreaves Hill Trotters Handicap’, at Yarra Valley on 17 February 2016. Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely cobalt, at a level of 237 micrograms per litre (µg/L), which is above the allowable threshold (at the time) of 200 µg/L in urine.    Charge 2 - AHRR 190B(1) reads as follows:    A trainer shall at all times keep and maintain a log book   The particulars of this charge related to the stable inspection conducted on 18 March 2016 by HRV Stewards, when Mr Grech was found not to keep and maintain a logbook as required.    Mr Grech pleaded guilty to both charges    The HRV RAD board heard evidence from Investigative Steward Stephen Svanosio, RASL Scientific Manager Paul Zahra and Veterinary Pharmacologist Professor Paul Mills. Each of those witnesses was cross-examined.   The HRV RAD Board also heard submissions from Ms Wood (for the HRV Stewards), Mr Grech and Mr Grech’s representative, Brian Lyngcoln.    In determining penalty, the HRV RAD Board considered Mr Grech’s 35-year involvement in the industry, his record which had two prior prohibited substance offences, the impact of any penalty on Mr Grech both specific and general deterrence and consistency of penalties in relation to cobalt cases. Taking all of these matters into account the HRV RAD Board imposed a 15-month suspension of Mr Grech’s trainers and drivers licences. The HRV RAD Board ordered the suspension to commence at midnight on Saturday 19 August 2017. On the second charge (relating to the log book) the HRV RAD Board imposed a $250 fine.   The HRV RAD Board also ordered that ‘Mister Oz’ be disqualified from Race 1 at Yarra Valley on 17 February 2016 and that the placings be amended accordingly   Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board    Harness Racing Victoria  

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today considered a charge issued against licensed trainer-driver Ross Graham under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1), that states:  A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances The charge related to a post-race urine sample collected from the horse ‘Sonetto’ after it won Race 2, the ‘Elite Horse Transport Trot’, at Shepparton on 27 July 2016. Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely cobalt, at a level of 298 micrograms per litre (µg/L), which is above the allowable threshold (at the time) of 200 µg/L in urine. Mr Graham pleaded not guilty to the charge.  The HRV RAD board considered statements from Investigative Steward Neal Conder, RASL Scientific Manager Paul Zahra and Veterinary Pharmacologist Professor Paul Mills, along with evidence from Veterinarians Dr Jim Vasey, Dr Richard Cust, Dr Greg Hargreaves and Swabbing Assistant Gordon Warner. After considering all the evidence tendered at the hearing and submissions from both parties, Mr Graham was found guilty of the charge.  The HRV RAD Board considered further penalty submissions from the HRV Stewards that included the seriousness of the charge; that the integrity of racing is protected; and comparable prohibited substance cases. Ross Graham’s penalty submissions were also considered, including his personal circumstances and a 25-year involvement in the industry with an excellent record. In considering all of these circumstances, in addition to both specific and general deterrence and consistency of penalty, the HRV RAD Board imposed a 15-month suspension of Mr Graham’s trainers licence. The HRV RAD Board ordered the suspension to commence at midnight on Sunday 13 August 2017. The HRV RAD Board also ordered that ‘Sonetto’ be disqualified from Race 2 at Shepparton on 27 July 2016 and that the placings be amended accordingly. Harness Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board 

Harness Racing South Australia Stewards today conducted a hearing into an adverse test result returned by RAP ARTIST following a pre-race urine test taken from the gelding on Saturday 7th January 2017. The particulars being that the sample taken from RAP ARTIST was shown to contain Cobalt at a mass concentration greater than the permissible tolerance. Mr Billinger admitted a breach of Rule (AHHR) 190(1) which states “A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances” After considering submissions on penalty put to the Stewards by Mr Billinger’s advocate, Mr R Fewings, and after having regard to all other factors, including that this was Mr Billinger’s second breach of the presentation rule, the finding was that Mr Billinger be disqualified for a period of eighteen (18) months and that, following the expiration of his disqualification, he be prohibited from holding a trainer’s licence for a further eighteen months.  Acting under the provisions of AHRR 195, RAP ARTIST was disqualified from second placing in Race 6 at Globe Derby on 7th January 2017 and Stewards directed that the placing’s be amended accordingly. Ross Neal Chairman of Stewards HARNESS RACING SOUTH AUSTRALIA

The Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) yesterday heard an application for review lodged by the Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards regarding a penalty decision of the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on 24 May 2017 in relation to a charge issued against licensed trainer-driver Alison Chisholm. On 24 May 2017, Mrs Chisholm pleaded guilty to a charge issued under Australian Harness Racing Rule 190(1) for presenting the horse ‘Jimmy The Editor NZ’ to race at Tabcorp Park Melton on 16 April 2016 when not free of cobalt, a prohibited substance when present at a concentration of greater than 200µg/L (as it was then). Mrs Chisholm was issued with a 12-month suspension of her trainers licence. The full HRV RAD Board media release can be found here. On 7 August 2017, VCAT Presiding Member Wentworth heard evidence from Veterinary Pharmacologist Professor Paul Mills, along with submissions and statements on behalf of the HRV Stewards and Mrs Chisholm. After considering all the material tendered, Member Wentworth reserved her decision on penalty and advised that a decision could be expected in approximately eight weeks. Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards have concluded an inquiry that commenced on Monday June 19, 2017, into a report received from Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) that Cobalt above the threshold of 100 micrograms per litre in urine had been detected in the urine sample taken from CAMELOT SPEEDSTAR following its win in race 2, the RANDALL JONES AUTOMOTIVE PACE (1900m) conducted at Broken Hill on Friday March 17, 2017. Licensed trainer-driver Ms Hughes provided evidence via telephone regarding CAMELOT SPEEDSTAR and her husbandry practices. Evidence including the Certificates of Analysis was presented to the inquiry. HRNSW Stewards issued the following charges against Ms Hughes pursuant to the Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) as follows: CHARGE 1 - AHRR 196A (1)  A person shall not administer or cause to be administered to a horse any prohibited substance…. (ii)  which is detected in any sample taken from such horse prior to or following the running of any race. (2)  A person who fails to comply with sub-rule (1) is guilty of an offence. CHARGE 2 (Alternative to Charge 1) - AHRR 196B.  (1)  A person shall not without the permission of the Stewards within one (1) clear day of the commencement of a race administer, attempt to administer or cause to be administered an injection to a horse nominated for that race…..  (4)  A person who fails to comply with sub-rule (1) is guilty of an offence. CHARGE 3 - AHRR 190.  (1)  A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. (2)  If a horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1) the trainer of the horse is guilty of an offence…. (4)  An offence under sub rule (2) or sub rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. Ms Hughes pleaded guilty to all charges and was issued with the following penalties: Charge 1: Four years disqualification Charge 2: No penalty recorded- alternative charge Charge 3: Four years disqualification The periods of disqualification is to be served concurrently and is to commence from April 20, 2017, the date upon which Ms Hughes was stood down. In considering penalty Stewards were mindful of the following; The serious nature of this offence; Ms Hughes’ guilty pleas; Ms Hughes’ first prohibited substance offence; Class 1 prohibited substance under the HRNSW Penalty Guidelines; Level of substance detected; Ms Hughes’ licence history and other personal subjective facts. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 195, Stewards disqualified CAMELOT SPEEDSTAR from the abovementioned race. Ms Hughes was advised of her right to appeal these decisions. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

Today the Norwegian Trotting Association published the verdict in the doping case against French harness racing trainer Fabrice Souloy, who had four trotters test positive for Cobalt in June 2016 at Bjerke, Oslo. Souloy was banned from training and driving for 15 years and fined $60,000. The association had wanted Souloy banned for life and fined $25,000. Souloy is still awaiting a verdict from the Swedish Trotting Association regarding a positive test from the Elitlopp 2016 -- also for Cobalt -- and it was thought that the two Scandinavian associations would have published their verdicts together. However, due to vacation the Swedish verdict is first expected to be known around July 5. At present Souloy is serving a one year ban in France after a positive test for Cobalt. by Karsten Bønsdorf, USTA Senior Newsroom Correspondent

Racing Integrity Unit general manager Mike Godber is defending his organisation's consistency around cobalt positives. Earlier this week, Canterbury harness racing trainer Cran Dalgety was hit with a $32,000 fine for presenting five horses to race with cobalt levels in excess of the 200 ug/L (micrograms per litre) threshold for the prohibited substance. Importantly, the Racing Integrity Unit (RIU) and the Judicial Control Authority (JCA), who handed down the penalty, agreed that Dalgety was guilty of negligence but did not intentionally administer cobalt or any other prohibited substance. Dalgety, a highly successful trainer best known for guiding the career of champion pacer Christen Me, questioned why Southland trainer Shane Walkinshaw escaped a presenting charge when two of his horses returned positive swabs for cobalt in late 2015. But Godber said attempting to compare the two cases was "drawing a long bow". Walkinshaw purchased an over the counter product and the label confirmed a small and legal amount of cobalt was present in the ingredients. However, the batch was contaminated and in fact contained 190 times the amount that was advertised. "In the Walkinshaw case we asked what more could he have done to prevent it and the answer was not a lot," Godber said. A raft of tests were done on the supplement and the Walkinshaw-trained Not Bad to determine that the product had been manufactured incorrectly. Both the supplier and the manufacturer took responsibility. Godber said the Dalgety case was different because the supplement, McGrouthers Equine Mineral Mix, was labelled as containing cobalt but it did not identify the amount. He said that put a significant responsibility on Dalgety to identify the level of cobalt in the product which he did not do. "If you look at the Dalgety case, it did not meet the criteria for there not to be a charge because there was clearly more he could have done," Godber said. He added that Dalgety's case was not helped by the fact the product was not being used by any other trainers in New Zealand and was not sold on a large commercial basis. Dalgety's counter to that argument was that he had been using the product without issue for more than 10 years and the label of the supplement said "will not return a positive swab" and "Licensed under Animal Remedies Act 1967 No 3392". It was later found to have not been licensed since at least 1997. The JCA decision said Dalgety's culpability was his failure to obtain appropriate advice on the use of a product containing cobalt after Harness Racing New Zealand (HRNZ) introduced a cobalt threshold 200 ug/L in May 2015. Godber added that products that were licensed under the act could still contain ingredients that were prohibited under the rules of racing. "It's really a case of buyer beware. The onus is on the trainer to make sure the product is free of any prohibited substances. "The message is, if you are in any doubt do not use the product until you have spoken to your vet." Dalgety also raised another case where two Canterbury trainers were not charged when they returned positive swabs for caffeine in 2013 that was also proven to be from a feed supplement. Godber said that was because the product did not show any signs of caffeine on its label and both trainers had sought veterinary advice. Dalgety described his $32,000 fine as excessive but Godber, who reiterated the value of the fine was set by the JCA, said he did not believe the fine was unreasonable given it was Dalgety's third offence in eight years. The RIU submitted for a fine between $36,000 and $86,250 but because it deemed the offence to be at the lower end of the scale, expected a penalty close to the $36,000 mark. Dalgety's two previous positives (caffeine and bute) were deemed to be unintentional with the caffeine being a result of contaminated feed and the wrong horse being treated with bute by stable staff. The RIU acknowledged Dalgety had been fully cooperative throughout their investigation. WHAT IS COBALT? Cobalt is an essential trace element that is naturally occurring in horses, dogs and other mammals but has been demonstrated to have an effect on the blood system by stimulating the production of red blood cells making for a similar effect to Erythropoietin (EPO) doping. By Mat Kermeen Reprinted with permission of Stuff

On April 6, 2017, the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) released a Memorandum to the Canadian horse racing industry. "The CPMA would like to bring to the attention of the Canadian horse racing industry that as of February 22, 2017, cobalt was officially added to Section 2 of the Schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations." On April 21, 2017, the CPMA released another Memorandum with additional information regarding new cobalt thresholds. "Further to the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's (CPMA) Industry Notice dated April 6, 2017, regarding the implementation of CPMA cobalt testing effective May 1, 2017, the CPMA has received questions about what this means from a practical perspective given that cobalt occurs naturally in the horse." A copy of these CPMA memos are attached to this bulletin. As a result, effective May 1, 2017 Amended General Directive No. 2/2015 (attached) addressing enhanced testing for cobalt, is no longer in force. Please refer to the attached GENERAL DIRECTIVE NO. 2 - 2017 - Rescinding Enhanced Cobalt Testing Directive. The AGCO issues this Information Bulletin as a service. AGCO licensees are expected to know the Rules of Racing, closely review all memos from the CPMA, and keep up to date on the Schedule of Prohibited Drugs. Disponible en français. Additional information regarding new cobalt thresholds – April 21, 2017 Further to the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's (CPMA) Industry Notice dated April 6, 2017, regarding the implementation of CPMA cobalt testing effective May 1, 2017, the CPMA has received questions about what this means from a practical perspective given that cobalt occurs naturally in the horse. As you may know, several provinces have been testing for cobalt for the past couple of years. The provincial testing of cobalt was in blood only, using a threshold of 50 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL). The CPMA added cobalt to the list of quantitatively prohibited substances (section 2 of the schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations) in February of this year. After much research and collaboration with international regulators, it was determined that the thresholds for cobalt would be 25 ng/mL in blood and 100 ng/mL in urine. These levels are consistent with thresholds used in many other international jurisdictions. The CPMA's research indicates that vitamin supplements, when used alone and according to label directions, should not increase cobalt levels enough to cause a positive test. In addition, our research indicates that when horses were allowed free access to cobalt-containing salt blocks, there was little to no effect on the horse's cobalt levels. Cobalt levels may build up over time when given repeatedly, and its elimination from the horse can take an extended period of time. It is always good practice to take care and to read the list of ingredients when choosing products that are administered to horses. As with all medications and supplements, owners and trainers should discuss the use of cobalt supplements with their veterinarian. Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact CPMA. Sincerely, Steve Suttie   Implementation of cobalt testing under the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's Equine Drug Control Program – April 6, 2017 The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA) would like to bring to the attention of the Canadian horse racing industry that as of February 22, 2017, cobalt was officially added to Section 2 of the Schedule to the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations. It should be noted that cobalt testing in Canada will move from provincial oversight to the CPMA under its official Equine Drug Control Program as of May 1, 2017. The CPMA would also like to advise the horse racing industry that the quantitative threshold for cobalt testing will decrease from 50 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL) to 25 ng/mL in blood and that a new threshold of 100 ng/mL will be implemented in urine. These thresholds are published in the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations. The CPMA would like to remind industry participants to take care and to read the list of ingredients when choosing products that are administered to horses. As with all medications and supplements, owners and trainers should discuss the use of cobalt supplements with their veterinarian. Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact CPMA. Sincerely, Steve Suttie

On Thursday April 20, 2017, Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards suspended the licences of trainer/driver, Ms Kylie Hughes, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRNSW took these measures after receiving a report from Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a post-race urine sample taken from CAMELOT SPEEDSTAR following its win in race 2, the RANDALL JONES AUTOMOTIVE PACE (1900 metres) conducted at Broken Hill on Friday March 17, 2017. The “B” sample and associated control sample have been sent to the Racing Science Centre (QRIC) in Queensland for confirmatory testing. HRNSW Stewards considered all available evidence at that time and determined that Rule 183 should be invoked based on the following factors: The fact that a certificate has been issued by an approved drug testing laboratory confirming Cobalt above the threshold had been detected; The level of the reading relative to the permissible threshold; The serious nature of the substance; The absolute nature of AHRR 190 offences; The likely penalty of a significant period of disqualification if a prohibited substance offence is proven; The high unlikelihood that AHRR 256 will have any application if a prohibited substance offence is proven; The fact that HRNSW Policy in recent years has been to apply suspensions pursuant to AHRR 183 upon the receipt of one positive certificate; The fact that this is not a finding of guilt and that this will militate against any perceived reputational damage as a result of a suspension; (i) The fact that an offence against AHRR 190 does not involve any aspect of intent and that this must further militate against any perceived reputational damage as a result of a suspension Ms Hughes has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of her rights of appeal against the imposition of Rule 183. HRNSW Stewards have commenced an investigation into this sample result and an Inquiry will be scheduled in due course.   MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards conducted an Inquiry yesterday into a report received from the Australian Government National Measurement Institute that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a post-race urine sample taken from Apollo Thirteen NZ following its win in race 2, conducted at Newcastle on Saturday 22 October 2016. Licensed trainer-driver Mr Shannon Lindsay appeared at the Inquiry and provided evidence regarding the horse Apollo Thirteen NZ and his husbandry practices. Evidence including the Reports of Analysis was presented to the Inquiry. HRNSW Regulatory Veterinarian Dr Don Colantonio also provided evidence to the Inquiry. HRNSW Stewards issued the following charge against Mr Lindsay pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1), (2) & (4) as follows: AHRR 190.  (1)  A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. (2)  If a horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1) the trainer of the horse is guilty of an offence…. (4)  An offence under sub rule (2) or sub rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. Mr Lindsay was found guilty of that charge and disqualified for a period of four years to commence from 15 December 2016, the date upon which he was stood down. In considering penalty Stewards were mindful of the following: The serious nature of this offence; Mr Lindsay’s not guilty plea; Mr Lindsay’s first offence for a Prohibited Substance; Class 1 Prohibited Substance under the HRNSW Penalty Guidelines; Level of substance detected (240 ug/L); Mr Lindsay’s licence history and other personal subjective facts. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 195, Stewards disqualified Apollo Thirteen NZ from the abovementioned race. In addition, acting under the provisions of AHRR 195A, Stewards also disqualified Apollo Thirteen NZ from Race 1, conducted at Tabcorp Park Menangle on Sunday 30 October 2016. Mr Lindsay was advised of his right to appeal these decisions.   MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

On Wednesday 1 February 2017 Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards suspended the trainers licence of Mark Billinger pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRSA has taken this measure to protect the integrity of the industry following advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a urine sample taken from RAP ARTIST prior to its second placing in the Just Wrecking Toyotas Pace Final at Globe Derby on 7 January 2017. The ‘B’ sample has been sent to the Racing Chemistry Laboratory in Western Australia for confirmatory testing. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including any submissions provided by Mr Billinger as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that a Certificate has been issued by an approved drug testing laboratory confirming Cobalt above the threshold had been detected the level of the reading relative to the threshold the nature of the substance the absolute nature of prohibited substance offences the obligation of HRSA to protect the integrity of the harness racing industry. Mr Billinger has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of his appeal rights against this stand down. Stewards have commenced an investigation into this matter and an inquiry will be scheduled in due course. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards ............................................................................   On Wednesday 1 February 2017 Harness Racing SA (HRSA) Stewards suspended the trainers licence of Nick Tardio pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRSA has taken this measure to protect the integrity of the industry following advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a urine sample taken from GENUINE EXCUSE prior to its seventh placing in Race 9, Farewell Come On Frank Pace at Globe Derby on 7 January 2017. The ‘B’ sample has been sent to the Racing Chemistry Laboratory in Western Australia for confirmatory testing. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including any submissions provided by Mr Tardio as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that a Certificate has been issued by an approved drug testing laboratory confirming Cobalt above the threshold had been detected the level of the reading relative to the threshold the nature of the substance the absolute nature of prohibited substance offences the obligation of HRSA to protect the integrity of the harness racing industry. Mr Tardio has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of his appeal rights against this stand down. Stewards have commenced an investigation into this matter and an inquiry will be scheduled in due course Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

The NZ Racing Laboratory Services has advised the Racing Integrity Unit of irregularities in the urine samples taken from the horses Fatima Siad in Race 11 at the Timaru Harness Racing Club meeting on Saturday 19 November 2016 and Raukapuka Ruler in Race 1 at the NZMTC meeting on Friday 16 December 2016. Both horses are trained in Canterbury by Mr C Dalgety.   The irregularities are to Cobalt which in New Zealand Harness Racing is a prohibited substance at a level above 200 ug/L.    RIU Officials are conducting an investigation and no further comment will be made until the investigation has been completed.    A previous cobalt positive in harness racing was caused by contamination in a feed supplement.    Mike Godber  General Manager  Racing Integrity Unit

Fabrice Souloy, who is one of the leading harness racing trainers in France, is one of five trainers who have been suspended and fined after findings of Cobalt in tests. It was after a race in Cabourg, Normandy, in July, that Lover Face trained by Souloy came up with a positive test for Cobalt. Some weeks after it was announced that four more trotters trained by Souloy had tested positive for Cobalt in Sweden and Norway in races like the Elitlopp and Oslo Grand Prix. However, these cases are still under investigation. On Monday (Dec. 26) the French Trotting Association Le Trot made it public that five trainers -- including Souloy -- each had been fined $15,500 and their licenses were revoked for one year, starting Jan. 2, 2017. Souloy is nicknamed Mr. Group 1 as he has trained the winners of more than 70 Group 1 races all over Europe. In France horses trained by Souloy earned around $4 million this year. by Karsten Bønsdorf, USTA Newsroom Senior Correspondent

Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards today conducted an inquiry into a report received from Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) that Cobalt was detected in a urine sample taken from RAP ARTIST prior to it competing in Race 3, 2016 Sky Racing 3YO Colts & Geldings Southern Cross Final at Globe Derby on 30 July 2016. Evidence was taken from trainer Mark Billinger regarding his feeding and treatment regime and he provided his Log Book of Treatments to support this.  Regulatory Veterinarian Dr Roger Haensel and Mr Paul Zahra Scientific Manager from RASL also gave evidence. The evidence included two evidentiary certificates reporting the cobalt level for the ‘A’ sample of 215 micrograms per litre (measurement uncertainty of 10) and for the ‘B’ sample 220 micrograms per litre (measurement uncertainty of 20).  Further evidence provided by Dr. Haensel was that cobalt affects various body systems of a horse including the blood system and endocrine system and therefore is considered a prohibited substance.  The evidence of Mr Zahra from RASL was that the odds of the ‘B’ sample being 200 micrograms or below, was less than 1 in 333 and that there was a confidence level of greater than 99.7% that the ‘B’ sample was over the threshold. Mr Billinger was found guilty of charges under Rules 190(1), 190(2) and 190(4) in that he presented RAP ARTIST to race at Globe Derby on 30 July 2016 not free of a prohibited substance.  Stewards relied on Rule 191(6) which allows Stewards to establish in other ways (and not just the evidentiary certificates) that a horse was presented to race not free of a prohibited substance. In determining penalty, Stewards took into account: the not guilty plea the length of time Mr Billinger has been involved in training horses the penalties applied in other Cobalt cases in SA and other States the status of the race in that it was a Group race that created  interest and the subsequent negative perceptions when the winner returns a positive swab. Mr Billinger was disqualified for 3 years effective immediately and ordered to pay $1500 to HRSA to cover costs incurred including analytical testing. Acting under Rule 195 RAP ARTIST was disqualified from its first placing and all placings amended accordingly.  Barbara Scott CHAIR OF STEWARDS

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to charges issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) and 190B against licensed trainer Mr Des Hilton.  ARHR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Hilton related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Itmademyday’ following its 1st placing in Race 3, the ‘Discount Carpets 3YO Pace’, at Mildura on 19 June 2015.  Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. The charge under AHRR 190B related to stable inspections conducted by HRV Stewards when investigating the arsenic irregularity on 10 August 2015 and 8 September 2015 where Mr Hilton was found not to maintain a logbook as required by the Rules. During the investigation Mr Hilton explained that he did not use any arsenic based products and that Itmademyday had a tendency to chew the fence posts in the horse’s yard.  Subsequent analysis of samples of these fence posts revealed they contained arsenic at levels consistent with Copper Chromium Arsenic (CCA) treated timber. As background, with the acquisition of a machine capable of testing for cobalt by RASL (preventing need to test for samples to be sent interstate or overseas), in June 2015 the laboratory (RASL) were also able to commence the routine testing of all collected urine samples for other metals including arsenic.  With a number of samples above the threshold becoming apparent in racing jurisdictions, and common explanations as to the cause of such irregularities provided, the University of Melbourne were engaged to conduct an administration trial by RASL, HRV and other racing authorities that had also been screening raceday samples for the presence of arsenic. At the RAD Board hearing, in addition to the consideration of statements from HRV Stewards and RASL, the HRV RAD Board considered a report from Associate Professor Cate Steel and Professor Ted Whittem from the University of Melbourne which centred on the extensive research conducted by the University of Melbourne where a trial was conducted to research the levels of arsenic in horses that had ingested a known amount of CCA treated timber sawdust.  The trial revealed that it is a possibility that a horse could have a urinary level of arsenic that exceeds the threshold concentration if it chews and ingests a sufficiently large quantity of CCA treated timber.  Further studies will be done in the future in an attempt to distinguish between the inorganic and organic forms of arsenic. Mr Hilton pleaded guilty to the charge issued under AHRR 190(1).  After considering submissions from the HRV Stewards and Mr Hilton, the HRV RAD Board formally found Mr Hilton guilty though imposed no penalty against Mr Hilton in all the circumstances of the case.  In making this order, the HRV RAD Board had regard to the nature of the substance in that arsenic based products have been suggested by manufacturers as a tonic that are purported to improve appetite or the appearance of the coat of a horse.  The RAD Board also considered that the arsenic threshold had been developed a number of decades ago in Hong Kong in response to the suggestion (at the time) that horses were being ‘stopped’ through the use or arsenic rather than any suggested enhancement of performance.  The HRV RAD Board particularly considered the  results of the trial conducted by the University of Melbourne, the results of  analysis of the fence posts from Mr Hilton’s property, Mr Hilton’s guilty plea and clear record in regard to this rule over a 30-year involvement in the industry and also the length of time involved as a result of the thoroughness of the investigation and administration trials conducted by the University of Melbourne. The HRV RAD Board ordered that ‘Itmademyday’ be disqualified from Race 3 at Mildura on 19 June 2015, under ARHR 195, and that the placings be amended accordingly.   Additionally, the HRV RAD Board ordered all prizemoney for this race be returned under AHRR 200. Mr Hilton pleaded guilty to the additional charge under ARHR 190B in that he failed to keep and maintain a log book and was subsequently fined $250. Harness Racing Victoria

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