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Harness Racing South Australia stewards today suspended the trainers licence of Mario Borg, pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. This action was taken after receiving a report from Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) that dexamethasone was detected in a urine sample taken from ITS BEDLAM after it competed in Race 8, Book a Xmas Night At Globe Derby Pace, at Globe Derby on 12 December 2016. The ‘B’ sample was sent to the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory in Sydney and has been confirmed. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including submissions provided by Mr Borg as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that two Certificates from  approved drug testing laboratories have been received which confirmed the presence of dexamethasone; the nature of the substance; the absolute nature of Rule 190 offences; the obligation of HRSA to protect the harness racing industry. Mr Borg has not been charged with any offence and has been advised of his appeal rights against the imposition of Rule 183. No date for the inquiry has been set. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

On Wednesday 1 February 2017 Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards suspended the trainers licence of Francesca Carbone pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRSA has taken this measure to protect the integrity of the industry following advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd that dexamethasone was detected in a urine sample taken from PROMINENT ART following its first placing in Race 1, Jubilee Room New Menu Pace at Globe Derby on 5 December 2016. The ‘B’ sample has been confirmed by the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory in New South Wales. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including any submissions provided by Ms Carbone as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that two Certificates had been received from approved drug testing laboratories confirming the presence of dexamethasone which is conclusive evidence of the presence of a prohibited substance. the nature of the substance the absolute nature of prohibited substance offences the obligation of HRSA to protect the integrity of the harness racing industry. Ms Carbone has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of her appeal rights against this stand down. Stewards have commenced an investigation into this matter and an inquiry will be scheduled in due course. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

On Wednesday 1 February 2017 Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards suspended the trainers licence of Mark Billinger pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRSA has taken this measure to protect the integrity of the industry following advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a urine sample taken from RAP ARTIST prior to its second placing in the Just Wrecking Toyotas Pace Final at Globe Derby on 7 January 2017. The ‘B’ sample has been sent to the Racing Chemistry Laboratory in Western Australia for confirmatory testing. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including any submissions provided by Mr Billinger as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that a Certificate has been issued by an approved drug testing laboratory confirming Cobalt above the threshold had been detected the level of the reading relative to the threshold the nature of the substance the absolute nature of prohibited substance offences the obligation of HRSA to protect the integrity of the harness racing industry. Mr Billinger has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of his appeal rights against this stand down. Stewards have commenced an investigation into this matter and an inquiry will be scheduled in due course. Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards ............................................................................   On Wednesday 1 February 2017 Harness Racing SA (HRSA) Stewards suspended the trainers licence of Nick Tardio pursuant to Australian Harness Racing Rule 183. HRSA has taken this measure to protect the integrity of the industry following advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a urine sample taken from GENUINE EXCUSE prior to its seventh placing in Race 9, Farewell Come On Frank Pace at Globe Derby on 7 January 2017. The ‘B’ sample has been sent to the Racing Chemistry Laboratory in Western Australia for confirmatory testing. In making this decision, HRSA Stewards have considered all relevant information including any submissions provided by Mr Tardio as to why Rule 183 should not be invoked. Stewards also took into account the following factors: that a Certificate has been issued by an approved drug testing laboratory confirming Cobalt above the threshold had been detected the level of the reading relative to the threshold the nature of the substance the absolute nature of prohibited substance offences the obligation of HRSA to protect the integrity of the harness racing industry. Mr Tardio has not been charged with any breach of the Rules and has been advised of his appeal rights against this stand down. Stewards have commenced an investigation into this matter and an inquiry will be scheduled in due course Barbara Scott Chair of Stewards

Harness Racing Victoria Stewards and veterinarians have been collecting out of competition blood samples from yearlings scheduled to be sold at the upcoming Australian Pacing Gold (APG) Sales in Melbourne on Sunday 5 February 2017. All blood samples collected have been subjected to testing by Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) on their steroid screening test, which covers over 40 substances, and is understood to be the most comprehensive screening test in operation in Australia. RASL report that all of the analysed samples are clear of steroids. HRV wish to acknowledge the significant support of APG in assisting HRV’s efforts to ensure compliance with the national harness racing rules, introduced in May 2014, which banned the use of steroids at all times. Harness Racing Victoria

Following Harness Racing New South Wales' endless commitment to fight against the use of illegal and banned substances, more than 40 out-of-competition swab samples have been collected over the past two days. These samples were taken from horses that are competing at Tabcorp Park Menangle this Saturday night. This strategy follows tests obtained from horses that were engaged at Penrith last Thursday week and also Tabcorp Park Menangle last Saturday night and HRNSW Integrity Officers will continue collecting more samples according to Chairman of Stewards Graham Loch. "This strategy will be continued in coming weeks as feature meetings and Carnival of Cups race meetings wind up," Loch said. "In addition, whilst our recent focus has been close to Sydney similar visits are planned across the state." For further information please contact Graham Loch at (02) 9722 6600 or gloch@hrnsw.com.au AMANDA RANDO

The NZ Racing Laboratory Services has advised the Racing Integrity Unit of irregularities in the urine samples taken from the horses Fatima Siad in Race 11 at the Timaru Harness Racing Club meeting on Saturday 19 November 2016 and Raukapuka Ruler in Race 1 at the NZMTC meeting on Friday 16 December 2016. Both horses are trained in Canterbury by Mr C Dalgety.   The irregularities are to Cobalt which in New Zealand Harness Racing is a prohibited substance at a level above 200 ug/L.    RIU Officials are conducting an investigation and no further comment will be made until the investigation has been completed.    A previous cobalt positive in harness racing was caused by contamination in a feed supplement.    Mike Godber  General Manager  Racing Integrity Unit

Queensland Racing Integrity Commission Stewards today concluded the inquiry opened on 2 November 2106 into the analysts finding of Dexamethasone in the urine samples taken from the registered Standardbred Plain Dream from Race 6 at Redcliffe on 12 May 2016 and from Race 8 at Redcliffe on 19 May 2016. Plain Dream was trained for these events by John Edmunds. Dexamethasone is a potent synthetic member of the glucocorticoid class of steroid hormones that acts as an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant. After considering the evidence presented Stewards charged John Edmunds with two (2) breaches of Australian Harness Racing Rule 190(1) which reads: 190      (1)        A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances Charge 1 - Specifics being that John Edmunds did present Plain Dream to race at Redcliffe on 12 May 2016 not free of a prohibited substance in that a urine sample taken from the horse has detected the presence of Dexamethasone. Charge 2 - Specifics being that John Edmunds did present Plain Dream to race at Redcliffe on 19 May 2016 not free of a prohibited substance in that a urine sample taken from the horse has detected the presence of Dexamethasone. Mr Edmunds pleaded guilty to both charges.   In determining an appropriate penalty, amongst other things, Stewards considered the following: Mr Edmund’s previous record relating to this type of matter; Ms Edmund’s personal and financial situation; The particular circumstances of this case; The guilty plea entered The need for a penalty to serve as a deterrent to illustrate that drug free racing is of paramount importance to the integrity of harness racing; After considering penalties applied in recent comparable matters Stewards deemed that in relation to Charge 1 a fine of $5,000 be imposed and in relation to Charge 2 a fine of $5,000 be imposed. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 190(5) Plain Dream was disqualified from Race 6 at Redcliffe on 12 May 2016 and from Race 8 at Redcliffe on 19 May 2016 and the placings amended accordingly. Mr Edmunds was advised of his rights of an Internal Review. Stewards’ Report – Harness Trainer – John Edmunds Date – 22 December 2016 Panel – N. Torpey; L. Wilson & E. Little

Fabrice Souloy, who is one of the leading harness racing trainers in France, is one of five trainers who have been suspended and fined after findings of Cobalt in tests. It was after a race in Cabourg, Normandy, in July, that Lover Face trained by Souloy came up with a positive test for Cobalt. Some weeks after it was announced that four more trotters trained by Souloy had tested positive for Cobalt in Sweden and Norway in races like the Elitlopp and Oslo Grand Prix. However, these cases are still under investigation. On Monday (Dec. 26) the French Trotting Association Le Trot made it public that five trainers -- including Souloy -- each had been fined $15,500 and their licenses were revoked for one year, starting Jan. 2, 2017. Souloy is nicknamed Mr. Group 1 as he has trained the winners of more than 70 Group 1 races all over Europe. In France horses trained by Souloy earned around $4 million this year. by Karsten Bønsdorf, USTA Newsroom Senior Correspondent

Pending RAD Board Hearing – Rohan Hillier - Harness Racing Victoria Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Rohan Hillier under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Ryley Major was presented to race at Melton on 7 July 2016 by Mr Hillier when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.   Pending RAD Board Hearing – Jodi Quinlan HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Ms Jodi Quinlan under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Sky Majesty was presented to race at Bendigo on 22 June 2016 by Ms Quinlan when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.   Pending RAD Board Hearing – Andrew Gath HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Andrew Gath under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse K D Muscles NZ was presented to race at Horsham on 14 March 2016 by Mr Gath when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.  

As a result of a hearing held on Nov. 30, the New Jersey Racing Commission has suspended harness racing trainer Ake Svanstedt 15 days and fined him $500 as a result of a positive test on Resolve in the $273,600 John Cashman Jr. Memorial Trot on Aug. 6 at the Meadowlands. Svanstedt also received a second positive on his trotter Blue Muse, who won an $8,000 amateur race on Aug. 5 at the Meadowlands with his wife, Sarah, driving, and received the same penalties. The positives were for Dexamethasone, which is a Class C violation as recommended by the Association of Racing Commissioners International. With Ake Svanstedt driving, Resolve won the Cashman in a career-best 1:50.2, besting Obrigado by 1-1/4 lengths. As a result of the positive test and subsequent disqualification of Resolve, Obrigado is now the official winner of the race. According to the New Jersey ruling, Svanstedt's two 15-day suspensions will be served consecutively, starting on Jan. 2, 2017, and continuing through and including Jan. 31, 2017. The ruling also states that "in addition to the penalty issued, a total of two Multiple Medication Violation points, as recommended by the Association of Racing Commissioners International, shall be assigned as a result of these Class C violations."   Resolve (Ake Svanstedt) John Cashman Memorial TVG FFA Trot     Courtesy of harnessracing.com 

Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards today conducted an inquiry into a report received from Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) that Cobalt was detected in a urine sample taken from RAP ARTIST prior to it competing in Race 3, 2016 Sky Racing 3YO Colts & Geldings Southern Cross Final at Globe Derby on 30 July 2016. Evidence was taken from trainer Mark Billinger regarding his feeding and treatment regime and he provided his Log Book of Treatments to support this.  Regulatory Veterinarian Dr Roger Haensel and Mr Paul Zahra Scientific Manager from RASL also gave evidence. The evidence included two evidentiary certificates reporting the cobalt level for the ‘A’ sample of 215 micrograms per litre (measurement uncertainty of 10) and for the ‘B’ sample 220 micrograms per litre (measurement uncertainty of 20).  Further evidence provided by Dr. Haensel was that cobalt affects various body systems of a horse including the blood system and endocrine system and therefore is considered a prohibited substance.  The evidence of Mr Zahra from RASL was that the odds of the ‘B’ sample being 200 micrograms or below, was less than 1 in 333 and that there was a confidence level of greater than 99.7% that the ‘B’ sample was over the threshold. Mr Billinger was found guilty of charges under Rules 190(1), 190(2) and 190(4) in that he presented RAP ARTIST to race at Globe Derby on 30 July 2016 not free of a prohibited substance.  Stewards relied on Rule 191(6) which allows Stewards to establish in other ways (and not just the evidentiary certificates) that a horse was presented to race not free of a prohibited substance. In determining penalty, Stewards took into account: the not guilty plea the length of time Mr Billinger has been involved in training horses the penalties applied in other Cobalt cases in SA and other States the status of the race in that it was a Group race that created  interest and the subsequent negative perceptions when the winner returns a positive swab. Mr Billinger was disqualified for 3 years effective immediately and ordered to pay $1500 to HRSA to cover costs incurred including analytical testing. Acting under Rule 195 RAP ARTIST was disqualified from its first placing and all placings amended accordingly.  Barbara Scott CHAIR OF STEWARDS

Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards today, acting under Rule 183 have suspended the licence of Trainer/Driver Mr Wade Knight after receiving advice from Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) that O-desmethylvenlafaxine has been detected in a urine sample taken from LOVING LIFE followings its win in Race 4 Henry Osborne Fodder Store Pace at Port Pirie on 14 October 2016. The ‘B’ sample has been confirmed by the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory in NSW. Mr Knight was given an opportunity to make submissions to HRSA as to why the provisions of Rule 183 should not be imposed.  Submissions were received and together with all available information, were considered by HRSA Stewards. No date for an inquiry into this matter has been set. Barbara Scott CHAIR OF STEWARDS   O-desmethylvenlafaxine

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to charges issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) and 190B against licensed trainer Ms Emma Stewart.  ARHR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Ms Stewart related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Berisari’ following its 1st placing in Race 12, the ‘Empire Stallions VicBred Super Series (4YO Mares) (2nd Semi Final)’, at Melton on 26 June 2015.  Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. The charge under AHRR 190B related to stable inspections conducted by HRV Stewards when investigating the arsenic irregularity on 7 August 2015 and 11 September 2015 where Ms Stewart was found not to maintain a logbook as required by the Rules. During the investigation Ms Stewart explained and provided supporting veterinary records to indicate she did not use any arsenic based products and that the only arsenic on her property was within the treated timber fence posts on her property which Berisari had a significant habit of chewing.  Subsequent analysis of samples of these fence posts revealed they contained arsenic at levels consistent with Copper Chromium Arsenic (CCA) treated timber. As background, with the acquisition of a machine capable of testing for cobalt by RASL (preventing the need for samples to be sent interstate or overseas), in June 2015 the laboratory (RASL) were also able to commence the routine testing of all collected urine samples for other metals including arsenic.  With a number of samples above the threshold becoming apparent in racing jurisdictions, and common explanations as to the cause of such irregularities provided, the University of Melbourne were engaged to conduct an administration trial by RASL, HRV and other racing authorities that had also been screening raceday samples for the presence of arsenic. At the RAD Board hearing, in addition to the consideration of statements from HRV Stewards and RASL, the HRV RAD Board considered a report from Associate Professor Cate Steel and Professor Ted Whittem from the University of Melbourne which centred on the extensive research conducted by the University of Melbourne where a trial was conducted to research the levels of arsenic in horses that had ingested a known amount of CCA treated timber sawdust.  The trial revealed that it is a possibility that a horse could have a urinary level of arsenic that exceeds the threshold concentration if it chews and ingests a sufficiently large quantity of CCA treated timber.  Further studies will be done in the future in an attempt to distinguish between the inorganic and organic forms of arsenic. Ms Stewart pleaded guilty to the charge issued under AHRR 190(1).  The HRV RAD Board formally found Ms Stewart guilty though imposed no penalty against Ms Stewart in all the circumstances of the case.  In making this order, the HRV RAD Board had regard to the nature of the substance in that arsenic based products have been suggested by manufacturers as tonics that are purported to improve appetite or the appearance of the coat of a horse.  The RAD Board also considered that the arsenic threshold had been developed a number of decades ago in Hong Kong in response to the suggestion (at the time) that horses were being ‘stopped’ through the use or arsenic rather than any suggested enhancement of performance.  The HRV RAD Board particularly considered the  results of the trial conducted by the University of Melbourne, the analysis of the fence posts from Ms Stewart’s property, Ms Stewart’s guilty plea and prior record in regard to this rule whilst presenting over 3,700 horses to race.  The RAD Board considered the principles of the High Court decision of Veen v The Queen when taking into account the 1 previous matter on Ms Stewart’s record in 2006.  The RAD Board also considered other precedent cases involving the substance, including the matter of Rasmussen in Queensland in 2015 whereby no penalty was imposed for such an arsenic case.  The RAD Board also considered the length of time involved as a result of the thoroughness of the investigation and administration trials conducted by the University of Melbourne. The HRV RAD Board ordered that ‘Berisari’ be disqualified from Race 12 at Melton on 26 June 2015, under ARHR 195, and that the placings be amended accordingly.  Owing to the race being a qualifying race for another race, the RAD Board also ordered that ‘Berisari’ be disqualified from its 5th placing in Race 9 at Melton on 4 July 2015.   Additionally, the HRV RAD Board ordered all prizemoney for the relevant races be returned under AHRR 200. Ms Stewart pleaded guilty to the additional charge under AHRR 190B in that she failed to keep and maintain a log book and was subsequently fined $250.   HRV RAD Board Hearing – Paul Rousch The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to a charge issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) against licensed trainer Mr Paul Rousch.  ARHR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Rousch related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Thelongroadnorth’ following its 1st placing in Race 3, the ‘Des O’Keeffe Farrier Pace’, at Terang on 5 January 2016.  Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. During the investigation Mr Rousch explained that he did not use any arsenic based products and that the only arsenic on his property was within the treated timber fence posts on his property which Thelongroadnorth had a habit of destroying by chewing.  Subsequent analysis of samples of these fence posts revealed they contained arsenic at levels consistent with Copper Chromium Arsenic (CCA) treated timber. As background, with the acquisition of a machine capable of testing for cobalt by RASL (preventing the need for samples to be sent interstate or overseas), in June 2015 the laboratory (RASL) were also able to commence the routine testing of all collected urine samples for other metals including arsenic.  With a number of samples above the threshold becoming apparent in racing jurisdictions, and common explanations as to the cause of such irregularities provided, the University of Melbourne were engaged to conduct an administration trial by RASL, HRV and other racing authorities that had also been screening raceday samples for the presence of arsenic. At the RAD Board hearing, in addition to the consideration of statements from HRV Stewards and RASL, the HRV RAD Board considered a report from Associate Professor Cate Steel and Professor Ted Whittem from the University of Melbourne which centred on the extensive research conducted by the University of Melbourne where a trial was conducted to research the levels of arsenic in horses that had ingested a known amount of CCA treated timber sawdust.  The trial revealed that it is a possibility that a horse could have a urinary level of arsenic that exceeds the threshold concentration if it chews and ingests a sufficiently large quantity of CCA treated timber.  Further studies will be done in the future in an attempt to distinguish between the inorganic and organic forms of arsenic. Mr Rousch pleaded guilty to the charge issued under AHRR 190(1).  The HRV RAD Board formally found Mr Rousch guilty though imposed no penalty against Mr Rousch in all the circumstances of the case.  In making this order, the HRV RAD Board had regard to the nature of the substance in that arsenic based products have been suggested by manufacturers as tonics that are purported to improve appetite or the appearance of the coat of a horse.  The RAD Board also considered that the arsenic threshold had been developed a number of decades ago in Hong Kong in response to the suggestion (at the time) that horses were being ‘stopped’ through the use or arsenic rather than any suggested enhancement of performance.  The HRV RAD Board particularly considered the results of the trial conducted by the University of Melbourne, the analysis of the fence posts from Mr Rousch’s property, Mr Rousch’s guilty plea and his clear record in regard to this rule.  The RAD Board also considered other precedent cases involving the substance, including the matter of Rasmussen in Queensland in 2015 whereby no penalty was imposed for such an arsenic case.  The RAD Board also considered the length of time involved as a result of the thoroughness of the investigation and administration trials conducted by the University of Melbourne. The HRV RAD Board ordered that ‘Thelongroadnorth’ be disqualified from Race 3 at Terang on 5 January 2016, under ARHR 195, and that the placings be amended accordingly.   HRV RAD Board Hearing – Shane Hillier The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today heard a matter in regards to charges issued by HRV Stewards under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) against licensed NSW trainer Mr Shane Hillier.  AHRR 190(1) reads as follows:     A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. The charge under AHRR 190(1) issued by HRV Stewards against Mr Hillier related to a urine sample collected from the horse ‘Sir Roy’ following its 1st placing in Race 2, the ‘Shepparton Renault Pace’, at Shepparton on 11 June 2015.  Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) reported that analysis of the urine sample revealed the sample to contain a prohibited substance, namely arsenic, in excess of the allowable threshold. During the investigation Mr Hillier explained that the only possible explanation for the analysis results were the fence posts on his property which had been chewed, with Mr Hillier indicating that he used an arsenic based product throughout his career in accordance with his usual practice and understanding of the withholding period for such product called Invigorate which he viewed as being helpful with respect to a horse’s appetite and coat. Subsequent analysis of samples of these fence posts from Mr Hillier’s NSW property revealed they contained arsenic at levels consistent with Copper Chromium Arsenic (CCA) treated timber. As background, with the acquisition of a machine capable of testing for cobalt by RASL (preventing the need for samples to be sent interstate or overseas), in June 2015 the laboratory (RASL) were also able to commence the routine testing of all collected urine samples for other metals including arsenic.  With a number of samples above the threshold becoming apparent in racing jurisdictions, and common explanations as to the cause of such irregularities provided, the University of Melbourne were engaged to conduct an administration trial by RASL, HRV and other racing authorities that had also been screening raceday samples for the presence of arsenic. At the RAD Board hearing, in addition to the consideration of statements from HRV Stewards and RASL, the HRV RAD Board considered a report from Associate Professor Cate Steel and Professor Ted Whittem from the University of Melbourne which centred on the extensive research conducted by the University of Melbourne where a trial was conducted to research the levels of arsenic in horses that had ingested a known amount of CCA treated timber sawdust.  The trial revealed that it is a possibility that a horse could have a urinary level of arsenic that exceeds the threshold concentration if it chews and ingests a sufficiently large quantity of CCA treated timber.  Further studies will be done in the future in an attempt to distinguish between the inorganic and organic forms of arsenic. Mr Hillier pleaded guilty to the charge issued under AHRR 190(1).  The HRV RAD Board formally found Mr Hillier guilty though imposed no penalty against Mr Hillier in all the circumstances of the case.  In making this order, the HRV RAD Board had regard to the nature of the substance in that arsenic based products have been suggested by manufacturers as tonics that are purported to improve appetite or the appearance of the coat of a horse.  The RAD Board also considered that the arsenic threshold had been developed a number of decades ago in Hong Kong in response to the suggestion (at the time) that horses were being ‘stopped’ through the use or arsenic rather than any suggested enhancement of performance.  The HRV RAD Board particularly considered the  results of the trial conducted by the University of Melbourne, the analysis of the fence posts from Mr Hillier’s property, Mr Hillier’s guilty plea and prior record in regard to this rule whilst presenting over 900 horses to race.  The RAD Board considered the principles of the High Court decision of Veen v The Queen when taking into account the 1 previous matter on Mr Hillier’s record in 2009.  The RAD Board also considered other precedent cases involving the substance, including the matter of Rasmussen in Queensland in 2015 whereby no penalty was imposed for such an arsenic case.  The RAD Board also considered the length of time involved as a result of the thoroughness of the investigation and administration trials conducted by the University of Melbourne. The HRV RAD Board ordered that ‘Sir Roy’ be disqualified from Race 2 at Shepparton on 11 June 2015, under AHRR 195, and that the placings be amended accordingly.  Additionally, the HRV RAD Board ordered all prizemoney for the relevant race be returned under AHRR 200. Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing Victoria Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr David Bartley under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Capri was presented to race at Bendigo on 18 January 2016 by Mr Bartley when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.   Pending RAD Board Hearing – Allan Lousada HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Allan Lousada under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Fiftyshadesofbrown was presented to race at Warragul on 19 January 2016 by Mr Lousada when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.   Pending RAD Board Hearing – Matthew Craven HRV Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Mr Matthew Craven under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190 (1) which provides: A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that the horse Craving A Smile was presented to race at Maryborough on 21 January 2016 by Mr Craven when not free of arsenic, a prohibited substance when evidenced by a concentration above the allowable threshold. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.   02 December 2016 Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing South Australia (HRSA) Stewards conducted an inquiry yesterday into a report received from Racing Analytical Services Ltd (RASL) that Cobalt above the threshold was detected in a urine sample taken from PENNY SNATCHER prior to it competing in Race 3, the BGC Industrial Cleaning Supplies 3YO Pace at Globe Derby on 8 August 2016. The ‘B’ sample was confirmed by Racing Chem Centre in Western Australia. Evidence was taken from trainer Scott Garraway regarding his feeding and treatment regime and regulatory veterinarian Dr. Roger Haensel. Mr Garraway was found guilty of charges under Rules 190(1), 190(2) and 190(4) in that he presented PENNY SNATCHER to race at Globe Derby on 8 August 2016 not free of a prohibited substance.  Mr Garraway was disqualified for 3 years and ordered to pay $1500 to HRSA to cover the cost of analytical testing. In determining penalty Stewards took into account: ·        the level of Cobalt recorded (350 ug/L) ·        the short period of time Mr Garraway has held a trainers licence ·        his not guilty plea ·        the penalties applied in other Cobalt cases in SA Mr Garraway has since lodged an appeal with the Racing Appeals Tribunal and has been granted a stay of proceedings. Barbara Scott CHAIR OF STEWARDS

Office Of Racing Integrity Stewards have conducted an Inquiry into the results of analysis on urine samples taken from GLAMOUR ART, following its second placing in Race 11- “ The Luxbet For Those That Know Racing Pace” at the Launceston Pacing Club race meeting on 28 August 2016. Analysis of the samples indicated the presence of the Prohibited Substance DEXAMETHASONE.  Evidence was heard from representatives of Racing Analytical Services Limited and The Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory, Consultant Veterinarian Dr. Peter Horridge and from trainer Dylan Ford as well as veterinary evidence on behalf of Mr Ford. Mr Ford pleaded guilty to three charges as follows.  1. AHRR 190B(1) – A Trainer shall at all times keep and maintain a log book recording all details of treatment administered to any horse in his or her care. 2. AHRR 190(1) – A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. 3. AHRR 196A(1)- A person shall not administer or cause to be administered to a horse any prohibited substance (ii) which is detected in any sample taken from such horse prior to or following the running of any race. After hearing submissions on penalty and taking into account all relevant factors the following penalties were imposed.  Charge 1. A fine of $200 Charge 2. A disqualification for five months. Charge 3. A disqualification for five months. Stewards ordered that the two periods of disqualification be served concurrently, commencing immediately and expiring at midnight on 22 April 2017. Mr Ford was given until 5 p.m. on 25 November to remove from his training property any horses in his care. In accordance with AHRR 195 GLAMOUR ART was disqualified from its second placing with the race results to be amended accordingly. Mr Ford was advised of his rights of Appeal.  Adrian Crowther Chairman of Stewards (Harness) (03) 6777 1900

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