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YONKERS, N.Y. – Sunday morning (October 7), there was no time for celebration in Chris Oakes’ barn on the backstretch at the Red Mile. Homicide Hunter, who set a world record for the fastest trotting mile ever the afternoon before, stood in his stall after going out to jog several laps with caretaker Therese Pierce.  Despite his remarkable achievement on the track, in the barn, Homicide Hunter was barely noticeable, standing silently in a dark corner of his stall without so much as a fuss as Pierce tended to him with the stall door wide open. “Not crazy. We went out for dinner afterwards, shared a few laughs, and we’re back to work today,” Oakes said as he looked admiringly into the trotter’s stall. “You can’t dwell on it too long, we have to work now, we have to keep going.” Homicide Hunter shipped back to Oakes’ Pennsylvania farm this week and will ship to Yonkers Friday to arrive in time for the 24-hour detention barn ahead of Saturday’s Harry Harvey Trot, a $250,000 invitational on the Yonkers International Trot undercard. The stakes will mark Homicide Hunter’s first local start since August 12 and his first start after setting the record. “He has a 10-hour ship back to Pennsylvania, then gets hauled Friday up to Yonkers, race, then be back to Pocono for the Breeders Crown. It’s a lot to ask of these horses,” Oakes said. “He’ll be getting a nice, easy week in the field. I’ve got a pool at the farm right inside the barn, they’ll get swimming a lot and get turned out. That’s what he really enjoys.” Homicide Hunter’s easy week comes off a grueling schedule. After winning the $100,000 Great Northeast Open Series Final over 10 furlongs at Pocono September 2, Homicide Hunter had a tune up at Pocono September 12 before shipping to the Midwest. He finished third in the Caesars Trotting Classic at Hoosier Park September 21 and fourth in the Dayton Trotting Derby September 28 before heading to the Red Mile for the Allerage Farms Open Trot. The Allerage set up perfectly for Homicide Hunter, who has come from off the pace in all of his recent stakes tries. Lindy The Great put up a quarter in :26.2 and after taking the lead heading up the backstretch, Will Take Charge passed the half in :53.2.  Homicide Hunter followed Lindy The Great and Pinkman in the flow third over to three-quarters in 1:22. Brian Sears tipped Homicide Hunter four-wide into the stretch and with a :26 final quarter under with minimal urging from the Hall of Fame driver, Homicide Hunter swept past the field to win by 3 lengths in 1:48.4.  Oakes thought Homicide Hunter could trot sub-1:50, but never expected a world record. He was thrilled to share the moment with owners Al and Michelle Crawford. The win improved Homicide Hunter’s record to 38 wins from 75 starts and boosted his earnings to $1,463,927. “I knew instantly that was a world record. I’m just very happy for the horse and for the owners, too,” Oakes said. “They bring so much to the game and you like to see good people like that do good. When they spend the money they do on horses like this, it’s nice to see things go right. “Luckily, they were on time in front of him, they were getting down there. That helped,” he continued. “The horses that were in front of him were racing hard and of course, he hadn’t been used yet. So, when he did get free, he was loaded.” Homicide Hunter raced barefoot in his record-setting mile, a decision Oakes grappled with before the race. It was his second time racing barefoot for Oakes; the only other instance came in the same race one year earlier when Homicide Hunter was second to Hannelore Hanover in a 1:49.2 mile. The shoes were back on Sunday morning, as they will be for his start in the Harry Harvey Trot. “The track was extremely fast; the conditions were perfect,” Oakes said. “I was contemplating whether I was going to take his shoes off or not, but if you don’t do it on a day like that, you’ll never do it. I thought it was the right conditions and he was OK with it. “This year, the only I thing I did differently was I put no boots on him at all. He wears trotting boots behind, like most of them do, the only thing I put on his hind legs were two wraps, keep it as light as possible, and it worked,” he said. The Harry Harvey Trot will be a completely different style of racing for Homicide Hunter than what he encountered at the Red Mile. He will shift from the mile track to the half, will face a big field of nine rivals, and will stretch back out to 10 furlongs. Although Homicide Hunter won a local Open Handicap Trot at 1 ¼-miles from off the pace earlier this year, Oakes doesn’t want to be too far back against a tough field Saturday. “He’s OK with Yonkers. Big change and maybe even a change in strategies too,” Oakes said. “I don’t know if we can be that far back at Yonkers, it’s a different style of racing there, a little bit more speed involved.” Homicide Hunter drew post 10 and with Sears back in the bike, is the 3-1 morning line favorite in the Harry Harvey Trot. He’ll face Guardian Angel As, the runner up in the Allerage for Annette Lorentzon, who drew post 3 and is 4-1 early. Warrawee Roo, who finished second in the Dayton Trotting Derby last out, is 6-1 from the inside post. The field also includes a host of recent local winners, including Top Flight Angel, In Secret, Yes Mickey, Gruden, NF Happenstance, Sortie and DW’s NY Yank. After his world record score, a win in the Harry Harvey Trot heading into the Breeders Crown would make an impressive campaign for the 6-year-old gelding. Oakes is just happy to be along for the ride. “This horse was a good horse long before I ever laid hands on him. His 3-year-old year in a very tough program in Indiana, this horse won 16 out of 18 (for Curt Grummel) and that tells you right there what kind of horse you’re dealing with. He’s a winner. He’s won half of his lifetime starts. It’s really all about him. I’m glad to be part of him." Saturday’s card also features the $1,000,000 Yonkers International Trot and the $250,000 Dan Rooney Invitational Pace. First post time is 1 p.m. For entries to the card, click here. For more information on the International Trot and its participants, click here. by Brandon Valvo, for the SOA of NY

YONKERS, NY, Monday, October 8, 2018--Post positions have been drawn for Saturday afternoon's (Oct. 13th) pair of Yonkers Raceway $250,000 Invitationals, the Harry Harvey Trot and Dan Rooney Pace (program pages accompany). The card will also feature the rivalry of McWicked and Lazarus battling again. The Harry Harvey goes as the seventh race (post time 3:10 PM), immediately before the $1 million Yonkers International Trot @ Empire City Casino. Both are 10-horse fields (eight on the gate, two in the second tier) carded at the mile-and-a-quarter distance. Here's the field for the Harvey..1-Warrawee Roo (Dan Dube), 2-Top Flight Angel (Andy Miller), 3-Guardian Angel AS (Matt Kakaley), 4-In Secret (George Brennan), 5-Yes Mickey (Jason Bartlett), 6-Gruden (Tim Tetrick), 7- NF Happenstance (Jack Parker Jr.), 8-Sortie (Trond Smedshammer), 9-DW's NY Yank (Yannick Gingras), 10-Homidice Hunter (Brian Sears). The Rooney, going the penultimate 11th race (post time 5 PM), drew out as such..1-Nuclear Dragon (Tetrick), 2-McWicked (Sears), 3-Endeavor (Tetrick also listed), 4-Bit of a Legend N (Jordan Stratton), 5-Evenin' of Pleasure (Joe Bongiorno), 6-Lazarus N (Gingras), 7-Mach it So (Bartlett), 8-Always at My Place (Brennan). Saturday's race schedule... Race 1 - 1 PM Race 2 - 1:20 PM Race 3 - 1:40 PM Race 4 - 2 PM Race 5 - 2:20 PM Race 6 - 2:40 PM Race 7 - 3:10 PM $250,000 Harry Harvey Invitational Trot (1¼ miles) Race 8 - 3:40 PM $1 million Yonkers International Trot @ Empire City Casino (1¼ miles) Race 9 - 4:10 PM Open Trot (1¼ miles) Race 10 - 4:40 PM Trot (1¼ miles) Race 11 - 5 PM $250,000 Dan Rooney Invitational Pace Race 12 - 5:20 PM The 40th International Trot is to be drawn Tuesday afternoon (Oct. 9th) at a midtown luncheon. A reminder that races 7 and 8 are part of a special all-stakes Pick 4 with Belmont Park (Pebbles and Floral Park). Races 7 through 10 are simulcast to the French-hubbed audience. by Frank Drucker, for Yonkers Raceway

Trenton, NJ --- If harness racing driver Ryan Harvey were a Standardbred instead of a human, he probably would have sold for half a million at a yearling sale just based on his pedigree. Harvey’s grandfathers, who both passed away this year, are harness racing royalty. Paternal granddad Harry Harvey is a Hambletonian winning driver and Hall of Famer, while maternal grandfather Walter “Boots” Dunn had an eight-decade career and is believed to be the leading amateur driver of all time according to USTA records. “They all joke about it, that if they had pedigree books for the drivers I’d be close to the front page,” Harvey said. “It puts a little pressure on me but I kind of hope to use it to my advantage. I’ll take the attention and obviously it’s given me more opportunities than if I wasn’t Boots and Harry’s grandson.” Ryan drove Famous Mistress -- trained by his aunt Lisa Dunn -- to his first career victory earlier this month at the Greene County Fair in Waynesburg, Pa. Since he does not have a registered set of colors yet, Harvey won the race wearing Boots’ colors and helmet, while also wearing Harry’s pants and vest. “I’m going to milk that for as long as I can,” Harvey said. “Once I get my actual set of colors that are registered, I’ll find a way to keep them in the mix.” And while his famous grandfathers have been major factors in Harvey’s career, his dad (and Harry’s son) Leo, has been Ryan’s biggest inspiration. Growing up in Imperial, Pa., in the shadows of the Pittsburgh Airport, Harvey would attend afternoon kindergarten class so Leo, a driver and trainer, could take him to The Meadows racetrack every morning. Instead of sleeping until 8, Ryan was rousted from bed at 6 a.m. to help out at the track. “This probably happened earlier than kindergarten,” Harvey said, “but my memory only started working in kindergarten.” He did the usual chores such as cleaning stalls and feeding the horses. He also had some unusual responsibilities while sitting on Leo’s lap when they drove around the track. “He’s a jokester,” Ryan said. “We’d get up alongside another trainer who was one of his friends and he’d whisper something in my ear to say to them. He’d have little 5- or 6-year-old me yelling out little smart remarks to all these people and then we’d trot right past them. “At the end of the day he’d give me money for the cafeteria to get some food and then he’d send me on to p.m. kindergarten. He made it fun. He got me in there and he didn’t hold back. I don’t think there were many 5-year-olds on the track at that point.” At age 10, a relative suggested Harvey enroll in the Harness Horse Youth Foundation camp, which taught him the sport’s nuances before the end-of-camp race. “Just little things, like braiding the horse’s hair, kind of the ins and outs,” Ryan said. “Even at that point I was ready to get behind a horse and go. I can remember looking forward to that race the whole week.” Harvey won the race, which he and his family recently watched on video. “My camp was at The Meadows, where (longtime Hall of Fame announcer) Roger Huston is,” Ryan said. “He knows my family pretty well. I won that race and he was giving his usual emphatic call. I came across the wire and he said ‘And there’s another driver in the family!’ I think a lot of people could see it coming.” All the while he was learning under Dunn, who lived 100 miles north in Cochranton, Pa. Ryan spent plenty of time there, getting a hands-on education most drivers can only dream of. He would also make trips to New Jersey and almost be in awe of grandpa Harry. “They’re both very important in harness racing in their own right,” Ryan said. “I would see Boots in action and I’d be like ‘All right, this is how it’s done.’ With Harry it was just like ‘Whoa!’” Both were also important to young Ryan. “Harry was more of a look-up-to-as-a-legend type of deal with me, where I kind of thought he was larger than life,” Harvey said. “Anytime I had the chance to say my grandfather won the Hambletonian I would use that to my advantage. “He was 92 when he passed, I’m 23, so most of the time I spent with him he was in his 80s. But he was still training and I was lucky enough to go to his barn. He had an impeccable operation where he was very business-like and no corners were cut. He was a no BS type man and I kind of always looked up to him like he was too good to be true.” And then there was Boots, a constant hands-on influence. “We’d be up here every single weekend,” said Ryan, who now lives at Boots’ farm and takes care of it. “He was more consciously impacting almost my every decision, not just harness racing. Boots would ride in the back of the trailer with the horses, there were no corners cut.” And while Boots assured Ryan he had the talent to drive Standardbreds, Harvey’s mom Kathy urged him to attend college. An admitted bookworm, Ryan said, “I was addicted to horses but I also didn’t want to put school in the backseat. We’d go to fairs and they would overlap with school. I’d take my schoolwork with me and make sure I had that done before anything.” Harvey showed business savvy at a young age, picking dandelions at the barn and selling them to make enough money for a candy bar. He went to the University of Pittsburgh and graduated with an economics degree. The summer after his junior year he got a Wall Street internship at a start-up online publication. Ryan would ride his bike -- a favorite form of transportation he still uses frequently -- from his NYU dorm to work. “Every day I sat behind a desk and basically hated it,” he said. Harvey began re-evaluating his goals and, despite having some job offers on the table, returned home to be with Dunn. After Ryan’s graduation, Boots’ cancer began to worsen and a nursing home was not an option. “He wouldn’t have fared well in that environment,” Harvey said. “He was jogging horses until the day he died. I came up here and helped take care of him and spend some special time with him. That’s when I got out of the job market. From there it’s been harness racing 100 percent.” Harvey and his aunt Lisa now tend to a dozen or so horses in training on Boots’ farm, and also have a broodmare operation that is preparing nine yearlings to race next year. Lisa, who is one of Boots’ daughters, provided Ryan with numerous drives but he went his first 17 without a win. With many of his family members on hand, he was disappointed when his horse broke behind the gate in his first race. “I was kind of getting to the point where I was like ‘All right, I need to do this now or never,’” Harvey said. “She was putting the faith in me, I had to go out there and produce results.” He did just that at the Greene County Fair on Aug. 9. It was only a three-horse race but the favorite, Brauti Hanover, has been winning at a steady rate on the fair circuit. “We kind of went in just hoping to get second, but it turned into a horserace,” said Harvey, who took advantage of Brauti Hanover bearing out and losing ground on the turns. “It was a stretch drive,” Harvey said. “We were pretty much neck and neck, stride for stride. I was just thinking about winning, and after it finally happened I kind of realized what just went down. I could hear my mom screaming and I was really overcome with joy and excitement. It was a special feeling. I think I might have shed a tear under my driving glasses but I was trying to hold back.” It was an exciting drive for Harvey, but not half as harrowing as one that he made at age 18. During his freshman year at Pitt, Ryan helped jog horses at fairs. One day he was approached by a starter who did numerous fairs and was responsible for getting the starting gates from fair to fair. “I guess I seemed like a likely candidate, because he approached me and said ‘Hey young fella, would you drive this?’” Harvey said, still laughing at the memory. “That starting gate doesn’t exist anymore; it was near the end of its life. And I was in this old jeep, if you would go over 55 it would rattle.” Harvey had to make a 150-mile drive halfway across Pennsylvania, from Hughesville to Honesdale. “I’m going down Interstate 80 with this starting gate, probably getting the weirdest looks I’ve ever gotten in my life,” Harvey said. “Even at 23 people probably think I’m not much more than 18. At 18 people probably thought I was 15 driving down the highway with this thing.” It was the kind of experience that colorful careers are made of. The kind of careers that both of his grandfathers had. And while he was disappointed that neither was alive to see his first driving victory, their spirit will live within Ryan forever. As of now, all thoughts are of harness racing. “The fair season’s coming to an end, after that I’ll kind of regroup, get my bearings,” Harvey said. “I just want to get along this summer and try to make next summer better. Anytime I can drive for Lisa, it makes me happy if I can do well for her. But it’s a different kind of feeling if you can do well for others. “I hope to build up the faith and trust from other owners and trainers and kind of get my name out there and see what I can do with it.” It’s a name that people certainly respect in the business -- on both sides of the family. by Rich Fisher, USTA Web Newsroom Senior Correspondent 

Harry Harvey, the Vermont-born son of a dairy farmer who trained and drove Albatross, one of harness racing's most important sires, died on July 17 at the age of 92 after a long battle with old age. One of 12 children, he was born October 22, 1923 in Duxbury, Vermont to Mabel and Harry F. Harvey. He drove his siblings to school in a pony cart, worked the fields with heavy horses, made maple syrup and cut ice from the Winooski River to help sustain the big family in a harsh, hilly climate. During World War II, he helped his father select green draft horses in Montreal, to be shipped by rail to the family farm. He walked them home from the rail yard with his siblings, leading two in each hand. Harvey helped train and sell the horses, in demand due to war-time restrictions on gas and oil. He saw harness racing at Vermont fairs and when Little Pat and driver Earl West won a race in 2:01 in 1938 at the Essex Junction Fair, his father confidently told him, "You'll never see a horse go faster." One of the young horseman's duties was to walk the work horses to the farrier over the bridge to Waterbury, where he read every word of Harness Horse magazine. Discerning that Tom Berry was the leading trainer and driver of the 1940s, he launched a job seeking, letter-writing campaign that spanned years. He finally got a telegram in 1947 telling him to report to winter training headquarters in Florida. Berry admitted years later that he offered the aspiring trainer a job just to stop the letters. Harvey joined the Delvin Miller Stable in 1951 and was a second trainer in 1953 when Miller entered Elgin and Charles Armstrong's filly, Helicopter, in the Hambletonian. Miller and his other second trainers, the late Jimmy Jordan and Jimmy Arthur, drove horses with better prospects, but in the 23 horse field, going three heats, Harvey and Helicopter prevailed. The next year, he left the racetrack to manage Miller's Meadow Lands (PA) Farm, where Adios was beginning his career as the sport's dominant sire. It was Harvey who suggested the mare Countess Vivian be bred to Dale Frost when Adios was battling the effects of laminitis. The mating produced Meadow Skipper. After Adios died in 1965, Harvey bought the Meadow Lands Farm annex where he lived and started his own Arden Hills Farm and racing stable at nearby Arden Downs, the Washington County fairgrounds. For 54 of their 61 years of marriage, Cornelia Harvey managed finances for the farm and stable, taught the children to ride and rode stallions at both Meadow Lands and Arden Hills Farms. It was at Arden Downs that Albatross, a son of Meadow Skipper, arrived in November of 1969, and where he was trained until sold in May of 1971 and moved to trainer Stanley Dancer a few weeks before the start of his three-year-old racing season. Harvey drove the colt through a 14 for 17 season and top juvenile pacing colt honors for 1970 and prepared him that winter and the following spring. Harvey was elected to the Harness Racing Hall of Fame in 2001 and continued to operate a public stable until 2009, driving in distinctive solid maroon colors. His long time patrons included Art and his son Tim Rooney, Saul and his sons Richard and Steven Finkelstein. He trained the Rooney-bred Hall of Fame broodmare Lismore and many of her $4.1 million winning progeny. In 1994, Rooney homebreds Lisheen (1:52.3, $518,405) and Newbridge (1:53.4, $237,528), out of Lismore and Powerscourt, respectively, also Harvey trainees, were first and second in the Mistletoe Shalee. Harvey referred to the pair, who spent nearly every day of their lives together, as the "Ballerina" (Lisheen, refined and quick) and the "Working Girl" (Newbridge, stout but relentless). Lislea Phia ($542,450 1:50.2), winner of the 2007 Matron Stake, and bred by Tim Rooney, was his last good horse. In his last years, Harvey delighted in watching YouTube replays of her improbable, incredible charge to the wire to win that race, driven by Tim Tetrick. A skilled woodworker, he made Mission and Shaker style furniture as fundraising items for the Harness Racing Museum and the Standardbred Retirement Foundation. The podium from which inductees to the Harness Racing Hall of Fame accept their honor was made by him from a black walnut tree on his New Jersey farm. Less complex creations included doll beds and fishing pole racks for grandchildren, for whom he also converted wheelbarrows and diaper boxes to makeshift carriages. He leaves behind his wife, Cornelia Etzel Harvey, who he met when she was a college student riding Saddlebreds at a farm in Goshen, New York, daughters Ellen Harvey, Anne Harvey Watson (Admiral James), Kathryn Harvey (Mark Teasdale) and son, Leo Harvey (Kathy Dunn Harvey), as well as grandchildren Elizabeth, Michael, Daniel and Emily Watson, Shawn and Ryan Harvey. His surviving siblings are Jim Harvey, Helene Harvey and Sister Mary Harvey. He was predeceased by infant daughters Elizabeth and Mary and siblings Irene, Steven, Ruth, Grayce, David, Wayne, Leo, and Mary Ellen. Funeral services will be private, with a graveside service for friends and family to be held at a later date at Queen of Heaven Cemetery in McMurray, Pennsylvania . Expressions of sympathy can be sent to Cornelia Harvey at Tower 506, St. Dominic Village, 2401 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, Texas, 77021. Memorial donations to the Harness Racing Museum, 240 Main Street, Goshen, NY 10924 or the Standardbred Retirement Foundation, 353 Sweetmans Lane, Suite 101, Millstone, NJ 08535 would be appreciated. by Ellen Harvey, for Harness Racing Communications

WASHINGTON, PA, May 18, 2015 -- Harness racing driver Roger Hammer notched career win 4,000 Monday at The Meadows Racetrack & Casino when he piloted Joevidal to victory in the sixth race. Hammer said that as a young trainer/driver, he never imagined he would achieve such a lofty milestone. "I never thought of the victories; I thought more of the money," he joked. "I was just enjoying the races." Hammer's involvement in harness racing, which now extends more than six decades, began when he was 6 and started helping his father, the late Clay Hammer, as the elder Hammer plied the Pennsylvania and Ohio fair circuits. Young Roger was 16 when he drove his first horse. It wasn't long before Hammer was amassing training and driving victories -- at raceways to be sure, but particularly at PA fairs -- and earning assignments from such renowned trainers as Harry Harvey. His career received a key boost when he formed a productive, long-lasting relationship with the late Max C. Hempt of Hempt Farms, an important breeder then and now. They became partners in many horses over the years. "A big part of my career was Max," Hammer said. "One thing about Max: Max never bothered you, never called you. He was just a true horseman. When he did call it was always after noon. He'd say, 'You're busy in the morning, and I don't want to bother you.' That's the way he was." Hammer indicated the notion that Hempt would tab the best "Keystone" yearlings for their partnership is false. "Everybody thought that, but that wasn't Max. It was after I bought his yearlings that he would say, 'Give me your list,' and he would pick out the ones he wanted for our partnership." With that steady supply of capable young horses, Hammer began to roll up eye-popping numbers. He's an eight-time North American UDR champion -- usually in the 300-499 starts category -- and his UDR exceeded .300 for a remarkable 26 straight years. On Sept. 9, 2003, he drove 11 winners at the York Fair; only Bruce Ranger (13 victories at Pompano Park on Sept. 5, 2009) has collected more wins on a single program. But Hammer's reputation as "King of the Fairs" underwent serious revision on Aug. 6, 2005, when he drove the gelding Vivid Photo, whom he trained and co-owns with Todd Schadel, to a stunning victory in the Hambletonian. That triumph -- with a horse he campaigned at the Big Butler Fair and the Clearfield Fair, no less -- proved that Hammer could, at the same time, be a throwback and a success in an environment dominated by catch drivers. Consider how unlikely his feat was. In the Hambletonian's first 25 years, 23 of the winners were driven by their trainers. In the most recent 25 years of the race, only five trainer/drivers have won: Stefan Melander (Scarlet Knight, 2001), Trond Smedshammer (Windsongs Legacy, 2004), Ray Schnittker (Deweycheatumnhowe, 2008), Jimmy Takter (Trixton, 2014) and Hammer. Even now, Hammer has no second thoughts about having raced his future Hambo champion at the fairs. "He was a mean horse in the stall, climbing the walls and running around biting himself," he told USTA a few years ago. "We had to castrate him to keep him from damaging himself. Best thing that ever happened to him, but here's the point. If I'd known how great he would become, I still would have raced him at the fairs at 2. It's educational, and if you pick the right fairs, it doesn't hurt them." Hammer says winning the sport's most prestigious race didn't change him. "It was the greatest thing, to win the Hambletonian, but it never changed my lifestyle, and it never changed my attitude as far as racing goes," he said. "It was a pleasure winning that race, but I was right back to the fairs the next day. I was glad that Harry Harvey was there. I only wish my dad and Max could have seen it." Today, Hammer operates his farm in Bedford, PA, roughly 100 miles east of The Meadows, where he manages about 70 head, including racehorses, broodmares, youngsters and a few retirees. Among the latter are Vivid Photo and Shark Kosmos, another top trotter of yore for Hammer, who pal around in their own paddock. Hammer has cut back a bit, typically driving only at The Meadows while relying on catch drivers elsewhere. "I like to torment the guys at The Meadows," Hammer said. "I like to tease them here." He's trying to reduce his equine holdings as well but is finding it difficult to do so. "When you raise 10 or 11 yearlings a year, it's hard to cut back because they accumulate too much," he said. "I'm trying to get rid of most of my racehorses, just keep a couple around to pay the bills. I'd like to cut back to 15-to-20 head, but I don't know what else I would do. That's the thing that keeps me going." Evan Pattak

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