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Just like the Vulcan saying, it looks like Standardbreds tend to live long happy lives after their harness racing days. … In case you’ve read that “the harness horse racers trash their horses after they use them up” type of articles which have been recently going around, here’s a quick roll call after only one afternoon in overwhelming response to a Facebook Wanted Post in the Preserve Harness Racing group. Enjoy! Kirsi Bertolini: Fulla Fire and Kirsti Bertolini “Fulla Fire is now 16 and we have done so much!! He’s been at school exhibition. He’s been at the fair to be petted and fed carrots. He’s been in nursing homes Christmas caroling now 6 times. I ride him at the ocean. We recently joined bunch of quarterhorses for a 10 mile trail ride by Maine trail riders association. He will do anything you throw in front of him without any hesitation. He’s my rockstar! Fulla Fire has his own Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/FullaFire/ There’s tons of photos!   Anita Rees: Shag endurance horse ”This is my guy Shag. He’s been doing 50 mile endurance events for 4 years. He’s a homebred who was never on the track, but was used for speed racking for years.” Teddy a Yard Ornament “Teddy’s registered name is Inaugural Affair, in his mid 20’s, a Presidential Ball son. He just goes loose in the yard and gets into things mostly.” Hula Lu – retired endurance horse “Here’s Hula Lu, 13 yr old, retired sound after 320 starts. She made approximately 90K in 8 1/2 years.” Brookview Charger trail horse Anita also has Brookview Charger who had “a rather dismal racing career. He’s 20 now and a fantastic trail horse. He was a speed racking horse for years as well.” Linda Laudeman Taylor: Bad Company Grand champion roadster “BAD COMPANY—-Went on to become Grand Champion Roadster Class winner at PA. National Horse Show in 1984. Lived to 32.” Micheal DI Gati: Birthday Toy – pleasure horse “Birthday Toy!! She’s my Pride and Joy!! My Favorite Toy!  Raced her until she was 6 … and now my Riding Partner!” Brielle Roman: Witch Hazel show jumper “Witch Hazel is a 3yr standardbred filly. Never made it to races, but I got her for $400 and she’s been to Devon and other high ranked horse shows, where she holds her own against warmbloods and the like, that cost more than 20 times what she did!” Pacific Western now a police horse “And here’s Pacific Western on his way to Newark PD for Police horse training!!” Russell Swenton: Russell Swenton & Laagendazz pacing stallion Russell Swenton & Laagendazz pacing stallion “I am an ex race horse trainer. When I got out of the business, I found my broodmares homes, and I still have my stallion, Laagendazz, that I couldn’t find a home for! He was 4 when he couldn’t race anymore. So I have fed and cared for him for the last 20 years knowing he would do nothing but look nice in the field! Most horse owners care deeply about their horses!” Vicki Brenneman: ”We have one now, Winbak Red, who was 13 when he retired, he now is at a farm down the road from our house. We rent the field and go everyday to care for him. Justin calls him our lawn ornament!” Katherine Smith “ I have two retirees; one 20 and the other 17 at home. And we have retired/adopted many ex-racers through New Vocations. All our horses are listed with Full Circle, and can be returned to us any time during their lives, no questions asked. Ending racing will deal a blow to the equine population in the US, and perhaps Canada.” Sally Hinckley: “I have Armbro Brando and Stelerbration, they’re a joy! Stelerbration is 24 and Brando is 18.” Standardbred Retirement Foundation SRF Standardbred as mounted police Standardbred as mounted police horses ”The”Brainiac Breed” is very popular with Mounted Police units! Check this out… SRF Standardbreds adopted to just one unit in NY, Nuke Suave, Dodge Ball, Cheyenne Michael, Justatravelingcam, Mowtown Express, Park City, Victory Glider K and Passerby! Did you know that SRF has 55 Standardbreds adopted to mounted patrol units such as Sheriffs’ Departments in Texas, Philadelphia Police, Morris County Parks, Newark Police, NYC and many more! SO proud of these fuzzy noses! Super temperament-adopt one, get your application in today at AdoptaHorse.org/ “ S Baker & Dana West: Santa & Mrs. Clause visiting the kids with Colonel Barnes “Dana and I bred Colonel Barnes ‘Oscar’ He wasn’t fast enough and he has now found a good home and a new job. A business owner was delivering a prefab shed to us, and he and Dana were talking about our horses. The next thing I know, he said he would give Oscar a home pulling a carriage. No funds were exchanged only ONE STIPULATION: If or when they should not be able to keep him for any reason, he is to come back to us. It was hard to let him go, as we usually keep them till they pass away, but he now has been rehomed for a second job! Cheri Collisen: Cammie – Pet “Cammie, a 20year old. Homes are found or they stay with me.” B’Lynn Powers: Blue an Off the track thoroughbred  The thoroughbred people are doing similarly- “I have a 27 year old OTTB from Charles Town that enjoyed a 2nd career as a hunter jumper, a 3rd as dressage and eventing at VA Intermont college and then at 19 years old, we found him, and he helped my daughter through the loss of her big brother – so 4th career is family – forever.” Greg Trotto: Jacob’s Money a lesson horse “Jacob’s Money retired due to a breathing problem, and at a farm near Vernon. They love him. Trail rides and giving riding lessons!” Susan Greenberg Merryman: Majestic – dressage & aspiring Endurance horse About her aspiring endurance horse- “My boy came from a mutual friend! His owner on the track was Katherine Smith and his trainer was Brooke Nickells! Majestic now 10, by Mach Three with a lifetime mark of 1:51, we adopted him in 2016 when he was coming seven. We trail ride him a lot and are working on dressage.” Shannon Schlotzhauer Stafford: Portrait therapeutic horse “This is Portrait, now 12, a well loved race horse making a difference as a therapy horse. He has such a gentle soul. From the time our son could walk, Portrait let him do anything, he would even hold up his back feet so our son could paint them. When he was no longer competitive, we knew he could make a difference in someone’s life. Now he reaches many people.” Ginger Keeler: Indian Hill Mojoe Trail horse “Here’s Indian Hill Mojoe, born at my place, my husband and I broke and raced him, now he’s my number one trail horse. He’s as tough as they come, an I love him to death.” Leslie Moore: Keystone Alexis therapy horse “Our little Lexi (Keystone Alexis) raced at Ocean Downs and Rosecroft. She went on to Starting Gaits Transition where she was discovered by Agape as a therapy horse. She was recently highlighted and enjoys support from the Indiana harness Racing industry.” Stephanie L Gray: Art by Keane – Stallion And halter champion Art By Keene. Racing, showing and just plain retired. He was 2014 National SPHO In Hand Champion. I had big plans for him, he made other plans. We do have a 2yo colt and 3yo filly he sired. They are not turning out to be much as race horses, however, I love them both dearly. At least they’re pretty. Stallion Art By Keene with owner’s son Caiden Below: “His 3yo filly, Sterling The Pot aka Ena and His 2yo colt, Kickstart My Art aka Junior.” 3yo filly, Sterling The Pot Two-year-old colt My Art Katy Reynolds Bradford: That’s Hall Folks – family horse Here’s That’s Hall Folks, a fifteen year old gelding who raced for nine years. He’s a sweet trail and family horse, with so much personality. I think the best way to describe him is an uncomplicated gentleman, below a shadow shot of this horse riding bareback and bitless! That’s Hall Folks riding bareback and bitless Patricia Clark: East Meets West Endurance Champion East Meets West. We started endurance in 2009. Eli has over 1000 endurance miles and over 500 ld miles. He was the 2011 USTA Endurance Horse of the Year. He has also completed two 75 mile rides.” Jessica Massey: Artdotcam – pleasure and show horse Artdotcam At Aasateague “I adopted Artdotcam (AKA “Bubba”) in the spring of 2012 from his owners. Bubba was a successful harness racer before he was retired from the track and started under saddle. I’m not a “trainer” by any means; I was just a lady who was looking for her first “very own horse”. After many, many hours and miles in the saddle, he has become an awesome trail horse that even my non-horsey husband rides! Bubba even occasionally goes with me to work in the State Forests (I work for the Maryland Forest Service) to do trail work & maintenance. I have posted about our many adventures, including pictures, over the years. I stay connected with his owners and they follow his life and care closely. “ Nena Winand: Winners Only – companion “My love. Winners Only, retired from both racing and breeding  because even when they are no longer breedable they still have a purpose, even if it’s only to be our companions.” Julie Tougas: Wally Dragon – multi talented “This is Wally Dragon. He’s 13 years old and retired from the track when he was 5 years old. I have only recently become his human partner, before me, Wally spent his off track years doing single and double harness, some gymkhana and pleasure riding. This photos is Wally and I, taken at our very first long distance riding event. I am now training Wally to be an endurance horse.” Purple Durple – parade horse “This is Purple Durple. Shes 15 years old. Retired when she was 7 years old. After a short try in the sport of endurance, Purple made it clear that she didn’t want to go fast anymore, so now she is living her life as a steady trail horse . This picture is of Purple and her other human Odile taken during a parade.” Katherine Smith Always Virginia teaches youngsters to groom “Always Virginia now living in Texas and being driven and ridden for fun, and teaching young kids how to groom and care for horses. There are so many more….” “My first two Standardbreds now living their retirement here at home Virginia. One is 21 the other 18. They do no work other than keep us happy.” That’s all for now folks! From endurance riding to the Police force to the show ring, or treasured companions, Standardbreds are quite talented and versatile. In addition, it looks like the harness horsemen have a great passion and respect for the star of the show, the Standardbred horse. Check out more at the USTrotting Association’s Life After Racing page.

Cream Ridge, NJ - 4/18/19 - Trial Victory, the aged harness racing stallion and son of the great Valley Victory, found tagged to ship for slaughter, has arrived at his new home in Alabama. The wonderful lady is a wildlife firefighter and is a rescue minded individual who already has a few just like him, rescued. She is delighted to receive him.   She, and the Standardbred Retirement Foundation (SRF) thank all who contributed to have him redirected to a safe situation, transported to quarantine, and shipped to his lucky opportunity to live out his life.   It is not easy to find a home for a stallion, a horse that is aged, and also blind in one eye, but this guy is finally experiencing a little luck in his life.   His new home shared, "He came with a healed eye injury leaving him 100% blind in the eye and does very well with it. Poor guy looks like something crushed the whole eye socket at some point, but he has no pain and no heat. He and my teenager puppy have already made friends. He's such a love bug and answers to "hey old man". He nickers when he sees me coming, food or not, and loves his ears scratched. He is an absolute gentleman. He still has his stallion moments of whinnying and thinking about my mare, but that's about it and then he goes back to grazing. I couldn't sleep the other night, so I went out and paid him a visit. He came up to me when I sat down and put his head in my lap while I rubbed his face and ears. Such a sweet boy! He has 4 acres to himself. It's wooded with a nice stand of grass underneath, and his hay roll."   Hundreds of Standardbreds are tagged to ship for slaughter every week. Many are in their late teens and early twenties, as breeding was prolific in the late 90's.   When these horses did not make the races, or made the races and had injuries, the vast majority of them were sold to the rural communities as workhorses. These communities typically treat animals as equipment. Used to plow fields, pull equipment, and as transportation, they are now ageing out as they like to "turn them over for fresh ones when in their teens". This is likely the reason for so many presently being shipped to the Canadian and Mexican slaughterhouses. These practices still continue for the present horses on the tracks and in the breeding sheds. In the past two years, with the help of the volunteer group on Facebook, Save Our Standardbreds From Slaughter, SOSS, SRF helped more than 1,100 trotters and pacers just like Trial Victory divert from the trip to slaughter, to one where they can live out their lives, and do so with dignity. Thank you to all who helped.   Tax-deductible donations may be made by going to www.AdoptaHorse.org or by calling Tammy at 609-738-3255 or email at SRFHorsesandkids@gmail.com. DONATE TO SRF TODAY!   About Standardbred Retirement Foundation   Standardbred Retirement Foundation, since 1989, provides humane care and services for horse in need of lifetime homes, and in crisis, through rehabilitation, training, adoption, life-long follow-up or life time sanctuary and offering therapeutic equine opportunities for children and adults.   Tammy Cailliau Phone: 609-738-3255 Email address: SRFHorsesandkids@gmail.com    

Warrior Inside started life as a winner. A Kentucky thoroughbred, the chestnut brown bay gelding racehorse trained at Churchill Downs in Louisville. In his debut last March in New Orleans, he placed second in a field of 63. But his fourth race at Churchill Downs was his last, coming in eighth. He'd developed career-ending bone chips in both front knees. Life after racing for most horses usually ends in one of two ways. Animals with good genes are used for stud service in hopes of producing superior stock. Others are sent to slaughter at rendering plants in Canada and Mexico. Furniture store chain IKEA made headlines in 2013 when traces of horse meat were found in the store's famous Swedish meatballs, which were sent out to several countries across Europe.  The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) estimates that 80,000 horses annually get processed for meat. More: Oxford firefighters, Oakland Co. deputies rescue horse trapped under ice More: Woman gets jail for neglect of horses in western Michigan (L to R) Mr. Palmer and Warrior Inside play with each other at their stalls inside Willowbrooke Farms in Plymouth, Michigan on Tuesday, February 5, 2019. This farm caters towards retired race horses enrolled in the Canter USA program that rehabs, retrains and finds new homes for thoroughbreds who leave racing at young ages when they become injured or are not fast enough to win. . (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)   Warrior Inside got lucky. He ended up at Canter Michigan, one of the few sanctuaries in the country that gives losing horses another shot. "When horses broke down, they would just get rid of them," said Canter Michigan's horse trainer Jennifer Blades on owners of racetracks. "Now, they're not allowed to do that, so that's made more horses come in through the Canter program." Warrior Inside, known as Indy by his handlers, is one of nine horses at Canter Michigan. The organization in Commerce Township, founded in 1998, today has 19 affiliates nationwide rehabbing former racehorses for new careers as show horses or for law enforcement. Blades, said most of the horses she sees “just weren’t fast enough” or suffered an injury — common for young horses. Jennifer Blades, the owner and operator of Willowbrooke Farms in Plymouth poses for a portrait with Warrior Inside, a former race horse on Tuesday, February 5, 2019. The farm caters towards retired race horses enrolled in the Canter USA program which rehabs, retrains and finds new homes for thoroughbreds who leave racing at young ages when they become injured or are not fast enough to win. . (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)   Road to recovery Indy's trainer, Tim Glyshaw, donated the horse to Canter Michigan which sent him to Michigan State University's large animal clinic for surgery in May. Afterward, he spent six months in rehab at a Lansing-area farm.  But surgery and rehab is expensive. Horse operations usually cost between $3,000-$4,000 and rehab an additional $2,000-$3,000, Blades said. Canter Michigan relies on fundraisers and support from other nonprofit agencies. In December, the ASPCA granted $225,000 to nine equine rescue groups, including the Michigan and national chapters of Canter. After rehab, Blades said, training begins. “We start with groundwork,” said Blades. “We put them in a crosstie and they learn to be groomed, handled and to be quiet. A lot of the racehorses are very jumpy and they will kick at you and will bounce around a little bit to break the ties.” Warrior Inside, a former race horse, burns off energy inside Willowbrooke Farms in Plymouth on Tuesday, February 5, 2019.  (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)   Not all horses receive the same training, since every equine is different. Some horses may only be able to spend 20 to 30 minutes outside, while others can last for an hour, Blades said.   “When I go to work with a horse, I have a basic plan, but I have to adapt it according to how they’re doing that day or each horse individually,” she said. “And they have their good and bad days just like we do. Some have more of a work ethic and really want to be good, and others don’t really want to be bothered."   Horse racing in Michigan  According to the Michigan Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association, a group dedicated to improving horse racing in the state, the rise of the sport in Michigan began in 1933 when Gov. William Comstock signed a law legalizing horse racing with wagering. Northville Downs became the state’s first racetrack, opening in 1944. Others soon followed, including Jackson Harness Raceway, Hazel Park Race Track and Detroit Race Course. Harness racers move down the home stretch at Northville Downs race track on Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Northville. (Photo: Kirthmon F. Dozier)   Horse racing hit its peak in the late 1980s, with eight tracks operating across the state, in cities such as Flint, Saginaw, Mount Pleasant and Muskegon. But the industry began to decline with increasing competition from other types of wagering, starting with the creation of the Michigan Lottery in 1972. Casinos built on Indian reservations became big in the 1980s, and Detroit saw the opening of three casinos in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Simulcasting, where guests could watch and bet on multiple live races in one location, helped keep racetracks open a little longer, but could not solely save them. Muskegon Race Course closed in 1997, with many of the other racetracks following suit into the late 2000s.  Last year, Hazel Park Race Track abruptly closed after nearly 70 years of business.The track was one of two racetracks still operating in the state, and the only track offering thoroughbred racing. Shortly after the closing of Hazel Park, home builder Hunter Pasteur Homes announced that Northville Downs will be sold and converted into a mixed-use development. The track plans to stay open through the 2020 racing season, and hopes to operate at a new location after the property is sold. Canter Executive Director Robbie Timmons said the group received two horses from Hazel Park right after the track closed, with another brought in last September. One equine has already found a new home.    However, Blades does not expect any horses from Northville Downs, since it only has standardbred horses, which are used in harness racing. Canter only trains thoroughbreds, with the majority coming from places like Ohio and Kentucky. A new life Willowbrooke Farms in Plymouth, caters to retired race horses enrolled in the Canter USA program that rehabs, retrains and finds new homes for thoroughbreds who leave racing at young ages when they become injured or are not fast enough to win.  (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)   How long it takes to get a racehorse ready for adoption can vary. Blades said horses are available for sale within a couple of months. But equines that have been injured might not be suitable for adoption until they've spent five to eight months in the program. When Indy is ready, he's expected to fetch $1,800, Blades said. Horses at Canter usually sell for prices ranging from $800 to $2,000 to buyers from as far away as North Carolina and Texas. Blades has yet to learn what Indy’s new career path will be, but she believes he "can do almost anything." “He’s quiet, easygoing, so I think he could be a pleasure horse. He’s built to be a jumping horse the way he moves, but we have not jumped him yet because we didn’t want to push it too soon. I think he’s gonna make some Canter adult an awesome horse for whatever they choose. "I just want to see the horse go on and be happy and have a good career and a good home.” By Micah Walker Reprinted with permission of the Detroit Free Press

The Standardbred Association Queensland Inc (SAQ) is excited to launch its 2019 Corporate Partnership Program, which will assist in raising much-needed funds for SAQ’s Rehoming and Adoption Program and save even more Standardbreds following their harness racing career. In 2002, SAQ started their Rehoming and Adoption Program, which was the first not-for-profit association in Queensland to focus specifically on retraining and rehoming retired racehorses. SAQ now rehomes between 80 and 120 Standardbreds each year after their career in harness racing - with the rehoming of the 1,100th Standardbred due to occur in the very near future. SAQ President, Owanna Francisca, said the Corporate Partnership Program was a very important element to SAQ’s annual revenue stream and helps to raise money for the Rehoming and Adoption Program. “To continue doing the important work that we do as a well-established Not-for-Profit providing a second chance for these wonderful horses, the SAQ sources grant funding and runs regular yearly events like the Track to Hack Series and our State Harness & Hacking Championships. We also partner with the business community in the form of mutually beneficial sponsorship opportunities” said Ms Francisca. SAQ is building on the success of last year’s Program by expanding the number of partnership opportunities available and is now seeking new Corporate Partners to join the SAQ family in 2019. SAQ Grants & Fundraising Office, Mark Hrycek, said “when you partner with SAQ, we ensure that the benefits don’t just flow to SAQ from your generosity. We implement strategies to provide your business and products with exposure into a key target market to help you build brand awareness, grow your customer base and/or increase your sales. “While at the same time, our Corporate Partners know that their invaluable support is also helping to provide a life after racing for the many Standardbreds who come through our Rehoming and Adoption Program” said Mr Hrycek. SAQ are keen to hear from any organisation interested in a small-investment/high-return Corporate Partnership opportunity that includes, logo/key message promotion, multiple advertising opportunities and numerous recognition of the partnership across various media elements - just to name a few. Further information on SAQ’s 2019 Corporate Partnership Program can be found by clicking here. Mark Hrycek WHAT SAQ’S 2018 MAJOR CORPORATE PARTNERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT THE PROGRAM:

Cream Ridge, NJ - 1/21/19 - Eight harness racing trotters and pacers in need of homes are now tagged and on the manifest to ship to the Canadian and Mexican slaughterhouses. The Standardbred Retirement Foundation, (SRF) is pleading for homes, other organizations for help, foster homes, and sponsors to get them out of these horrific “kill pens”.   Down from 35 in need, the remaining 8 are:   1.    Rookthatiscastling - or Fire Island (waiting on confirmation) Likely about 14 yr old. Gelding 2.    First Season, 14 yr. old mare. May only be able to walk under saddle. 3.    Bonnie Caviar may not be identified correctly-kill pen volunteer did not have time, may be Spartan Justice, 11 yr. old (not sure if g or m yet). Appears sound. 4.    DG’s Turnaround, 16 yr. old mare about 16.1h, appears sound. (Listed as deceased on her registration but incorrect) 5.    Have It Your Way, 14 yr. old mare, 15.2 needs hoof care immediately, appears sound. 6.    Naomi Blue Chip, 15 yr. old mare, 15.1 mother of 4 babies who earned $250,000. Appears sound. Scared in the pen. 7.    Taylor’s Design, 18 yr. old gelding, big handsome trotter, sore in back likely due to pulling weight much heavier than able to. 8.    Walk Of Shame, 14 yr. old mare, appears sound, may be blind in right eye but she appears to see the world.   Party Lights 13 yr. mare, is injured and being attended to, she has dropped suspensory, she is paid for, has a sponsor, but she needs a home. She has a heart on her forehead. Funny Girl - safe but needs an experienced home for mom and baby due in April.   In these pens the horses are rarely provided for any of their basic needs, shelter, water and feed. The harsh weather has made things much more difficult, however it also gave these horses a few more days of hope for homes, but the deadline is today at 5pm. SRF is beyond full, and it’s not just the large number of horses under SRF’s care that is blocking the help, it’s the financial restrictions. SRF has no regular funding, not privately, publicly, or from the racing industry. Some people feel humane euthanasia is better than shipping hundreds of miles to the borders to be slaughtered, even if that was an option, it is beyond the financial ability of the SRF. It is approximately $500 for the veterinarian and renderer to put a horse at peace.    SRF and everyone who has taken a horse or has contributed to help these animals is begging for help for the remaining eight. Two thousand two hundred dollars ($2,200) is still needed for bail, and eight homes, however, if homes are not found for all, sponsorship will help. In general, a horse will cost SRF $2,400- $4,200 annually, any part of a sponsorship monthly or for a year will save one of these horses.   To offer a home, a foster home, to sponsor a horse, make a donation please call SRF immediately at 609-738-3255, or email Tammy at SRFHorsesandKids@gmail.com.                                 ‌             About Standardbred Retirement Foundation       Standardbred Retirement Foundation provides human care and services for horse in need of lifetime homes, and in crisis. Through rehabilitation, training, adoption, life-long follow--up or life time sanctuary and offering therapeutic equine opportunities for children and adults.   Tammy Cailliau Phone: 609-738-3255 Email address:SRFHorsesandkids@gmail.com  

Millstone Township, NJ - April 25, 2018 -  The last three of the 21 trotters and pacers in the kill pens the Standardbred Retirement Foundation (SRF) is trying to keep from slaughter, have a reprieve, but do not have homes, Valid Moment, Native Avenue, and DeMartini. They do have donations to care for them until SRF can hopefully find them homes. Secret Impression who has a home is now sick and injured. A veterinarian has been called. Her home is now pending.   SRF expresses its heartfelt gratitude for the support received for these horses. It's been a stressful six days trying to pull it all together, very sad to have had to do this at all, but a few sweet things have come from this effort. Four horses had their past owners take them home, and help came from a horse that was considered rescued himself, St. Elmo Hero, who went on to earn nearly $800,000 for his owner John Barnard.   Josh Green, one of 21 owners of Skedaddle Hanover, during his racing career, owning him for just 6 months,stated, "I don't understand how people can be in racing and not fall in love with and appreciate how hard these horses try for us." Eric Goodell and Josh Green took Mr. Mystic N, one from this group, home on the same day they heard he was in trouble.    We were surprised that the United States Trotting Association, (USTA) chose not to pick up SRF's press releases, as their readers are people more closely associated with these animals than anyone, especially past breeders, owners, trainers, and fans. These are the people who should have this information. The USTA states that they do not have a policy on slaughter. It is well known that some of the directors oppose it and some are pro slaughter. We suggest that when members vote their new directors in that they pose that question before casting a vote.    Homes are still needed.       To offer a home, make a tax-deductible gift to help any of the other 390 horses inSRF's program, or to sponsor one, contact SRF 732-446-4422 or email SRF.Horseandkids@Adoptahorse.org. To see some of the other 390, to sponsor one, adopt one, or make a gift click here AdoptaHorse.org/Donate.    Standardbred Retirement Foundation | AdoptaHorse.org | Judith Bokman

Millstone Township, NJ - April 23, 2018 - Since Friday, April 20, 2018, of the 21 horses weighed and tagged to ship for slaughter, Mr. Mystic N was helped by his past owner, Eric Goodell, and trainer Joshua Green, and is being returned to Mr. Goodell; Jeremy Sharky was helped by Linda Maine, and being returned to her; DC Piggy Bank left to go to another organization in Indiana; Captain is going back to his owner Dr. Claude Gedreau in Canada; Forward Action has found a loving home in Kentucky by a dear friend of SRF;  two others have been offered a home at a rescue/sanctuary in NJ, that will be confirmed today. Two adoption applications have been received and will be screened. That leaves 14 others still in need of homes, and donations.   Funds have been raised for all expenses to help 2 more horses, but they do not have home offers. Should SRF need to find a place on their roster they can afford to do so with these donations, but by securing homes for them, donations can go to others in great need.   "We have asked for an extension beyond Tuesday's deadline, but we worry that the kill buyer will again pull a few from this group to fill his truck, should he have empty space," noted Paula Campbell, SRF's President. "This effort needs a collaboration of good, kind and generous people to get it accomplished. These horses worked hard when racing and most have had a miserable life afterwards. Slaughter is unacceptable."   The Standardbred Retirement Foundation(SRF) is presently paying for the all the care, board, and medical needs on 390 horses. It is stretched, and concerned about its financial situation, and without a farm of their own, the concern is even greater. "Since 1989 we have managed to follow-up every horse in the program for life, secure more than 4,000 adoptions, and care for those still not homed," shares Judith Bokman, SRF's Executive Director. "  We need so much more help to give these animals a little dignity. It shocks me that we have survived this long.  If it wasn't for a few small bequests over the years we wouldn't be here today trying to help these 21."   Here is how you and SRF can save these horses:   1. If you choose to take a horse back that you bred, owned or trained or wish to help a horse, SRF will assist with the facilitation. The list with their prices is available in the group of photos. 2. For horses with a home offer, but the home is unable to pay for the horses and the shipping (often to rural parts of the US), SRF will collect donations to help. 3. For a horse without a safe place to go, if donations cover all expenses, the price of the horse, shipping to quarantine, then shipping again to a boarding facility for rehabilitation and retraining for adoption and several months of board, SRF will consider whether it can take on the responsibility of another horse. This is approximately $3,000. 4. For horses with no help at all, the controversial option that is being considered is humane euthanasia. The cost is, the kill pen's purchase price, in addition to shipping to a facility, the veterinarian and rendering, approximately $550.   To offer a home, make a tax-deductible gift to help SRF Facilitate a horse to a home being offered, or to send a gift for SRF to afford taking on one, contact SRF 732-44604422 or SRF.Horseandkids@Adoptahorse.org.  CLICK HERE TO DONATE: https://www.adoptahorse.org/donate OR  https://www.gofundme.com/save-22-horses-from-slaughter - GoFund Me page. The list of horses is included in the group of photos.   A choice can be made whether a horse leaves the earth by the heinous act of slaughter or through humane euthanasia. Should some horses not receive help and you wish to provide a more peaceful passing please call us to discuss. To contact by telephone- 732-446-4422, email SRF.HorsesandKids@AdoptaHorse.com.         TAG # NAME SEX AGE TATTOO EARNINGS   PRICE SIRE/   DAME 1871 Mister Mystic N G,16 ZH205 $403,984 $800 In The Pocket-Seafield Mystic-Nero's Bebe 1877 Yankee Fur OR Stubling G, ? ? ? $720   1864 Nole G, 14 1BE96 $54,911 $810 Yankee Glide-CR Seminole Sister_Royal Trubador 1865 T-N-T Dozer G, 20 T4635 $23,102 $910 Sir Taurus-Midnight Oasis-Desert Night 1866 Forward Action   G, 15 4AE47 $761 $810 Save and adopted into a loving home  1868 Valid Movement G, 14 4DB75 $31,602 $800 Towner's Big Guy-Chevie Sprints-Sport Master 1863 Artistocracy G, 14 9BD28 $56,013 $810   Artiscape-Expensly Ashley-Expensive Scooter 1867 Loutopia M, 18 WC096 $0 $660 Sir Taurus-Golden LOu-Baltic Speed 1869 Demartini (formerly Whitsand Predator) G, 17 XR713 $0 $835 Grinfromeartoea r-Filly Bahama-Matt's Scooter 1880 Us Invader G, 20 T0018 $38,784 $660 Balanced Image-Picaboo Flame-Keystone Flame 43 Dale G. 15 8AC46 $10,454 $892 Inquirer Mandalay Bay-Overcomer No Tag Native Avenue G, 7 2J771 $3,460 $940 All American NAtive-Lady Welagin-Walton HAnover 688 Indiego G, 21 SC361 $0 $892 Die Laughing-Nude Indigo-Abercombie No Tag DC's Piggy Bank G, 15 5A679 $589,811 $675 Saved by another organization in Indiana. No Tag Hillbilly Style OR Letsgo Dort G, ? ? ? $650   No Tag Bob J L G, 15 9CN42 $48,026 $600   Dauntless Bunny-Etoile De Mai-Rumpus Hanover N/A Captain G, 13 9C641 $1,540 $700 BREEDER SAVED Him and Took Him Home. No Tag RC Kettle Chip G, 11 4EC77   $12,099 $1200   Dream Vacation-Malhana Gunilla-Bonefish No Tag Jeremy Sharky G, 15 4A407 $255,982 $750 Saved by Linda Maine and took him home. No Tag Secret Impression M, 14 4B682 $49,380 $625 Go Get Lost-Tuf Tonya-TZ 760 Casimir Army Patrol G, 20 TR315 $0 $700 Shre Patrol-Casimir Mooky     Standardbred Retirement Foundation | AdoptaHorse.org | Judith Bokman       Standardbred Retirement Foundation, 353 Sweetmans Lane, Suite 101, Millstone Twp., NJ 08535    

Seven years ago, Sue Wellman thought she had secured a retirement home for a harness racing horse named Bob Again. Wellman, from De Soto in southwest Wisconsin, runs the American Standardbred Adoption Program. Bob Again was shipped off to Missouri. But in October, Wellman was sickened to learn that Bob Again had been spotted online at a horse disposal business in Bastrop, La., in grave danger of being shipped to a slaughter plant in Mexico. She had no idea the 18-year-old horse, whose racing career ended in 2003, had been dumped by his owner — a breach of the program’s adoption contract. Immediately, Wellman said, she went about raising $2,350 in “bail money” to get Bob Again out of the kill pen and back to safety at her farm in De Soto.   We are still dealing with the adopter to find out how in the world this happened,” Wellman said. The last horse slaughter plants in the United States closed about a decade ago. But about 100,000 U.S. horses a year are shipped to slaughterhouses in Mexico and Canada, according to government statistics.  Horse meat, which can’t legally be sold as food in the U.S., is available in South America, Europe and Asia where it’s sometimes mixed with ground beef as a filler and even fetches a premium price for leanness and flavor. “What brings the most money is a young horse with lots of flesh because the price is per pound when they go to slaughter,” Wellman said. “They’re young, vital, sound horses. That’s the sad part of it.” Critics say the animals are crammed in trailers, without adequate food and water, for a journey of up to several thousand miles. Rescue operators scour the internet looking for horses, and then try to intervene, or outbid the kill-pen buyers at livestock auctions. ;A little bit of your heart dies every time you go to one of these places,” said Erin Groth, founder of Amazing Grace Equine Sanctuary in Elkhart Lake. From 2006 through 2010, U.S. horse exports for slaughter increased 148% to Canada and more than 600% to Mexico, a U.S. Government Accountability Office report noted after the U.S. horse slaughter plants closed.  Frisco, the oldest horse at Amazing Grace Equine Rescue, is boarded with the blind horses. (Photo: Mark Hoffman / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)   The rescuers say they’d like to see a ban on shipping horses to slaughter in Canada and Mexico, and some say the shutdown of U.S. plants made things worse because of the rough travel conditions the horses now have to endure. The battle goes back and forth,” said Scott Bayerl, director of the Midwest Horse Welfare Foundation, a rescue operation in Pittsville. “But what a crappy way to end an animal’s life.” 'This isn't for the faint of heart' What types of people are putting these animals up for slaughter? Some are individual owners overwhelmed and tired of owning a horse; some are hoarders forced by law enforcement to clean up unhealthy and inhumane livestock operations.  Groth said it’s taken her a while to accept the fact that she can’t save every horse in desperate straits. You get numb to it after a while. This isn’t for the faint of heart,” she said. Several businesses alleged to be kill-pen buyers did not return Milwaukee Journal Sentinel calls asking about their practices of acquiring horses, sometimes for $100 each, and reselling them for a profit or sending them out of the country to slaughter.  One of those businesses, in Minnesota, calls itself a rescue operation. But it's really not, according to Wellman.  A sign greets visitors at Amazing Grace Equine Rescue in Elkhart Lake. (Photo: Mark Hoffman / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)   She said the Minnesota business buys horses at various sales across the U.S. Then, it posts pictures weekly of some of the animals that are slaughter-bound. Those that don't get "bailed out" are put on a truck headed for Mexico.  The Wisconsin State Horse Council, which says its mission is to foster a unified equine industry, says it is neutral on the issue of horse slaughter plants and declined to answer Journal Sentinel questions. The American Horse Council says it “has not taken a position on horse slaughter as the equine industry remains divided” over the issue. The rescue operations, however, say a couple of things are certain: Out-of-control horse breeding has resulted in a surplus of animals, and the problem has been compounded by irresponsible or overwhelmed owners.  Wellman said she's helping a woman in Crawford County who has about 50 Arabian horses but little means of taking care of them properly. The woman, disabled and in her 80s, is living in a camper trailer with no running water. The sheriff's department has been called when the horses have broken out of their pasture, but deputies said there's not much they can do about the situation as long as the horses have adequate feed and water.  Wellman said there are horse skulls all over the property where some of the animals have died, but enough new offspring are being born that the herd continues.  She's started a networking effort to find homes for some of the horses.  "But most of them have never had a halter on, so it's going to be really tricky," she said. Horse rescues have waiting lists of people wanting to surrender their animals to them. They rely on donations and adoption fees to keep going, and some won’t take in another horse unless they’ve adopted one out first. Amazing Grace can handle about 25 horses at a time, including some that may never be placed in another home because they’re blind or have other needs. “We’re not going to take on more than we can handle. In the winter, we have very few volunteers,” Groth said. Expensive animals It costs about $1,500 a year to feed and care for a horse, and that doesn’t include unexpected medical bills. Some years, when the price of feed soars or the economy takes a bad turn, the rescues are flooded with calls from desperate horse owners.  We all get those calls daily,” Bayerl said. Dee Dee Golberg, president of Spirit Horse Equine Rescue Center near Janesville, said unwanted horses should be euthanized if homes can't be found for them.  "The very least you can do is offer a humane ending, and currently there's no method of doing that in a slaughterhouse," she said. Horses are sometimes shipped to feedlots in Oklahoma and Texas where they are fattened up before being sent to slaughter outside of the U.S.  Lisa Barth with N.E.W. Equine Resource Inc., a rescue near Shiocton, said she has taken in horses from kill-pen feedlots. "I personally did not bail them out," she said, but other people did and paid to have the horses shipped to her farm.  A 3-year-old mare and her colt were two of those horses. The colt was born on a feedlot in Oklahoma.  If she hadn't taken them in, Barth said, they were probably headed to Mexico.  Her rescue farm has accepted Belgians, Arabians and many other breeds of horses. Some arrived healthy and fit; others were thin and lame. Some had been well trained; others had never been handled.  "On average, I adopt out five horses a year. I have had as many as 23 in my backyard, but that's too much for one person" to take care of, she said.  Legally, horses are classified as livestock, but in the U.S. they enjoy a higher stature than cattle, pigs and chickens. For many people, horses are more like dogs than hogs.  People quickly become enamored with the idea of owning a horse before they realize the costs, the work that's involved, and the fact that it can live 25 or more years. Sometimes both the horse and its owner are miserable.  Barth said she gets the calls from people who are upset, frustrated and have no idea what to do with their horse. "They just want it gone," she said. By Rick Barrett, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Reprinted with permission of The Wisconsin State Farmer

Columbus, OH --- In early September, the United States Trotting Association (USTA) learned of social media reports concerning the condition of a Standardbred named Killean Cut Kid, which, it was reported, had been acquired by a horse rescue group from a sales pen in Bastrop, Louisiana. Photos showing wounds to Killean Cut Kid's ankles accompanied several of the Facebook and Twitter postings.  On Sept. 3, the USTA engaged the Association's contracted investigator, the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau, to conduct an inquiry into this matter to determine if any USTA rules on animal welfare had been violated. Thursday, the USTA issued the following statement regarding the investigation. Details of the investigation and the USTA’s rules on animal welfare follow below the statement. “The USTA is dismayed and disturbed by the chain of events revealed by its investigation, and by the actions that contributed to Killean Cut Kid’s plight. All of us who share a passion for horses find the images concerning and difficult to view, and we approached this investigation vigorously and seriously. “It is important to understand that State racing commissions, and not the USTA, determine who can and who cannot participate in racing in their respective jurisdictions. USTA’s scope of authority is clear -- we may only suspend memberships when specific rules are broken. While this situation is emotionally troubling, the investigation affirms that neither of the specific conditions for disqualification from the Association has been met. “The USTA has relayed its findings to the Ohio State Racing Commission and has been in contact with law enforcement in Union Parish, Louisiana. Should additional information pertinent to the investigation be made known, the Association will act accordingly.” ### Investigation Background: • The investigation indicates that Killean Cut Kid changed hands several times in the days following the initial social media postings regarding the need to euthanize the horse. • His trainer stated that Killean Cut Kid was given to an acquaintance in western Ohio.  • That acquaintance stated that he then gave custody of the horse to a local horse broker. The broker stated that he transported the horse with others to the sale in Louisiana.  • Those involved in the transfers and transport of Killean Cut Kid provided disparate and incomplete descriptions of Killean Cut Kid's ankles, and of the origin of their condition.  • Absent additional, corroborating information, the investigation was unable to ascertain definitively the timing and progression of Killean Cut Kid’s injuries, nor could it determine possession of the horse at the time they were incurred.  • The investigation found no evidence that the horse was insured. • Unannounced visits to the trainer’s farm and stable were conducted. All horses appeared to be in good condition, stalls were clean with sufficient shavings, and all had clean water. There were ample bales of hay and bags of horse feed available at both locations. • The investigation has determined that no charges have been filed by any law enforcement or animal welfare agency possessing the power to act upon them, and none are anticipated at this time. USTA rules governing animal welfare: In the area of animal welfare, the USTA rule book specifies the following: 1) Any person who has admitted to or been adjudicated guilty of participating in causing the intentional killing, maiming or injuring of a horse for the purpose of perpetuating insurance fraud or obtaining other illegal financial gain shall be barred from membership in this association for life. 2) Any person who has been the subject of an adverse finding in a final order in a prosecution arising out of treatment of a horse under any state animal welfare statute shall be disqualified from membership in this association for a minimum period of one (1) year with the length of disqualification beyond one (1) year to be determined by the gravity of the offense. USTA Communications Department 

Life has turned out well for 11 of the harness racing horses that were in an emaciated and weakened state when seized by the RSPCA from a northern property last year. Former trainer Keith William Toulmin, 68, was sentenced to a two-month wholly suspended jail term and fined $5000 after being convicted of animal cruelty, aggravated cruelty and failing to comply with a notice. The animals involved were all former harness racing horses, some of which were from New Zealand and had been worth $30,000-$40,000, the court heard. They belonged to different owners but had been left in the care of Toulmin and his son Craig, who had left the state. RSPCA investigations officer Carrie Palmer visited the 40ha property at Birralee in April last year and found the 15 horses. Over several months the RSPCA sought to force Toulmin to feed and medically treat the horses — eight of which he had been the registered trainer for. However, he claimed he could not afford to do so and that his car had broken down. Toulmin euthanised three horses. For nearly two months the remaining horses deteriorated in condition as winter set in. In June teams from the RSPCA and Department of Primary Industries visited the property. They euthanised a horse called Kinda Taz, which was unable to rise. The 11 remaining were seized by the RSPCA, which looked after them at a cost of $13,042 for the year or so since. “Seven were rehomed and I often get updates from the new owners that they are doing well,” Ms Palmer said. “Some have become trail-riding horses.” The RSPCA retains ownership of four horses, Sybella Brioso, Never Enough, Clyde Maguire and Royal Affair. “Three of them are at our facilities at the Cressy Research Station and they are rolling fat,” Ms Palmer said. “The fourth, Sybella Brioso, is at facilities at Mornington and she is also doing well.” By Nick Clark Reprinted with permission of The Mercury

My name is Anastacia and a friend Amanda Tanzer and I are fund raising to save a former harness racing horse named "Memphis".   Amanda was his groom when owned by his racing owner and was supposed to be sold to her once retired. His former owner sold him to a person who raced him and he ended up sustaining a serious suspensory injury. (see pic attached) When this happened, this person sold Memphis (drugged) to the Amish as a buggy horse.   Once it was discovered he was not sound, he was moved on.   It has taken 9 months to locate him and he has been found in Ohio. His current owner agreed to "sell" him to Amanda however, if funds are not secured he will be heading to auction. He simply stated he has no use for him. Memphis is now at the threat of being sent off to a horrible fate.    Amanda loves this horse very much and has even had a tattoo of his registration number placed on her arm.   We are aware that Memphis can no longer be ridden and it honestly does not matter. We just want him to have the chance to just be a horse.. He is only 6 years old.. a boy with alot of heart and he is much loved.    We are looking to raise $3500.00 which incl his purchase price, transport from Ohio to NY and his first vet examine for assesment.    I am including a link to the gofundme page here.   Amanda has also sent up a fundraising accout with SEFCU credit union to show sincerity as she did have to present her drivers lisence and provided her social security number in hopes this would ease minds that this fund raiser is legit, sincere and genuine.   Any help would be so appreciated if possible.    Hoping someone can find it in thier hearts to help this very good cause.    Anastacia M   anastaciam13@gmail.com

"One of a horse owner's greatest fears is seeing their 1,000 lb plus companion in peril," says Dr. Rebecca Gimenez, of Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue Inc. (TLAER). "Couple that with not having the ability to do anything about it and not knowing who to call for help and the situation can quickly go wrong with panic stricken judgment calls that may result in a disastrous outcome for the equine."    Over thirty firefighters and first responders descended upon the Meaford Fire Department Training Centre in Ontario for intensive training on what to do in emergency situations. The three days of rigorous training, presented by Grey Highlands and Meaford Fire Departments and Equine Guelph, took place Apr 28 - 30 2017.    Chief Rod Leeson and Chief Scott Granahan opened with a safety briefing, followed by Dr. Gimenez raising awareness of Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue concepts including how to deal with that panicked owner when arriving upon the scene. Problem solving utilizes the incident command system where cool heads prevail because everyone understands their role. This allows emergency responders, the veterinarian, owner and equipment operators, large animal ambulances etc. on the scene to communicate effectively and work together to find the best possible outcome.    First responders received important training in normal animal behaviour and what to expect when that animal becomes stressed, in order to proceed in a manner that keeps everyone safe from harm. Basic handling included how to approach livestock and where the blind zones and kick zones are located. How to create and secure an emergency halter and then restrain & lead the animal to a safe containment situation were more of the topics covered.    Equine Guelph director, Gayle Ecker, delivered a demonstration of great impact where equine anatomy and human anatomy was compared using life size skeletons of both. "Just as you would not pull a child out of a well by the arm; you cannot salvage a horse by wrapping a recovery strap to a limb without resulting in catastrophic damage," cautioned Ecker. For example, as easily as a human hand can be degloved, a horses tail can be removed if used to pull a horse out of a mud rescue situation. Limbs and tails are not handles!    Graphic and in-depth examples of What NOT to do were shown in case scenarios followed by hands on exercises included working with Rusti, the Rescue Horse mannequin. Gathering the proper equipment, the group practiced proper technique for drags and lifts to extricate a large animal from situations like a mud rescue, trench rescue or trailer roll over.    "This type of emergency rescue training is essential for first responders, and anyone involved with transporting livestock, to provide them the expertise they need to focus on the welfare and safety of animals and people in these sorts of emergency situations," says Ontario Veterinary College Dean Jeff Wichtel. "This is just one more example of the University of Guelph commitment to equine health and welfare, and the proactive training Equine Guelph provides to the equine industry, from horse owners to racing track personnel."    Special thanks to all the suppliers involved: Tractor/Equipment - Earth Power Equipment Meaford, livestock hauler - Aldcorn Brothers Company, Chapman's Ice Cream, water provided by Ice River Springs and last but not least, Abrams Towing and their recovery operator, John Allen.    Thank you to all the training crew expertly lead by Dr. Gimenez, Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue Inc.:    · Victor MacPherson, Adjala-Tosorontio Fire Department  · Deborah Chute, Adjala-Tosorontio Fire Department  · Chris Watson, Adjala-Tosorontio Fire Department  · Mark Whittick,Adjala-Tosorontio Fire Department  · Wendy McIsaac-Swackhamer, Erin Fire and Emergency Services  · Beverley Sheremeto, Severn Fire & Emergency Services  · Robert Nagle, Central York Fire Services  · Penny Lawlis, consultant for Professional Livestock Auditing Inc.  · Cathy Furness, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs  · Katherine Hoffman, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs,  · Gayle Ecker, Equine Guelph, University of Guelph  · Susan, Raymond, Equine Guelph, University of Guelph    "Many commendations were made by the participants to the fire hall and the municipal offices thanking the instructors for coming to our community," said Chief Scott Granahan, "great things have come from this weekend. Thank you."    A Final Thank you from Equine Guelph goes out to everyone involved in this important training and the participants dedicated to safe and successful rescues of large animals.    By Jackie Bellamy-Zions    Equine Guelph, 50 McGilvray St, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada  

"She must have a story to tell," said Judy Bokman, the Executive Director of the Standardbred Retirement Foundation (SRF) when speaking of HH Tracy, a 29 year old daughter of Distant Thunder. Not much of a harness racing horse, but Tracy was somewhere for 28 years. She might have been a workhorse, used for transportation, or was a beloved a pet, and today she stands tagged for slaughter in Pennsylvania waiting for her turn to ship to the Canadian slaughterhouse.   SRF is pleading for a place for her to live out her last few years, maybe only months. Her very sad eyes and grey face are very touching. Her fees will be paid to the kill buyer if someone would give her a place to live, a last opportunity before she passes peacefully.   HH Tracy was foaled in 1987 in Allentown, NJ. With hopes of making it to the Winner's Circle, either she didn't have the speed or desire to race around an oval, or perhaps she had an injury. What happened is anyone's guess. Some may feel it is time for her to be put at rest, but a long and difficult trip crammed in a packed livestock trailer from Pennsylvania to Canada can take up to two days. At 29 years old, or at any age this is grueling.   To offer a home for Tracy, please contact Tammy Hollock at 732 446-4422 or Admin@srfmail.com. To make a tax-deductible gift for SRF to help her, go to http://www.adoptahorse.org/#!donate/ctzx or Paypal to Admin@SRFmail.com. Standardbred Retirement Foundation | 353 Sweetmans Lane, Suite 101 | Millstone Twp. | NJ | 08535

Stewards today concluded an inquiry pertaining to six registered standardbreds owned by Darcel Lindau-Johnson and Alan Johnson. After considering all the evidence available, Stewards charged Mrs Lindau-Johnson and Mr Johnson pursuant to AHR Rule 218 which reads: “A person having responsibility for the welfare of a horse shall not fail to care for it properly”. The specifics of the charge being that Mrs Darcel Lindau-Johnson and Mr Alan Johnson, as the registered owners of six registered standardbred horses present on a property, and therefore responsible for their welfare, failed to care for those horses properly. A further charge was issued against Mrs Lindau-Johnson and Mr Johnson under AHR Rule 187(1) which reads: “A person who is directed to do so by the Stewards shall attend an inquiry or investigation convened or conducted by them.” The specifics of the charge being that Mrs Darcel Lindau-Johnson and Mr Alan Johnson, failed to comply with a direction from Stewards to attend an inquiry at Deagon on 24 March, 2015. Mrs Lindau-Johnson and Mr Johnson pleaded not guilty to all charges however Stewards were of the view that the charges could be sustained as issued and therefore found them guilty. When considering the matter of penalty, Stewards were mindful of significant mitigating factors. In all the circumstances Stewards determined that a fine of $200 each be applied for the breach of Rule 187(1), and that no further action would be taken for the breach of Rule 218 conditional to the horses being removed from the relevant property by Friday, 19 June 2015. Stewards further advised that upon satisfying this condition, the embargo placed on all horses owned by Mrs Lindau-Johnson and Mr Johnson under Rule 183(c) would be lifted. Panel: D Farquharson, K Wolsey, D Aurisch - Racing Queensland

The merits of attending Ontario's first Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue (TLAER) Operations program became abundantly clear, just two seasons later, for horse owner Karen Dallimore of Orton, ON. "When my horse Cody became cast, the education I received allowed me to think clearly, put a plan into place and get Cody back on his feet without endangering myself," said Karen who had already stocked her barn with safety equipment after the intensive hands-on seminar. She remembered the words of world renowned expert, Dr. Rebecca Gimenez, "I can't stress enough the need for proper equipment to be worn by ALL when handling these large animals in emergency situations, including a helmet, gloves, reflective vest on roadways, etc. If you're not equipped, then stay back." Quickly, gathering up some ropes, a helmet and tools, Karen returned to the scene in her indoor arena where 1,300 pounds of Quarter horse lay cast against the kickboards. The emphasis of having a Plan A, B, C ... came together without panic and the council of a "perfect rescue" being the one where the animal frees itself topped the list. After strapping on a helmet, plan A became nailing a board to the smooth, sloped kickboard so the upside down 16'1 gelding could gain purchase. Cody remained calm but still could not find his way out of the dilemma. With help of her husband, Harry, Plan B became keeping a safe distance away from potentially dangerous hooves that were dangling in the air and extending their reach with barn tools to slip ropes around Cody in order to pull him out of the situation. The TLAER program took participants through the do's and don'ts of large animal rescue so Karen knew where she could and could not attach ropes for a safe rescue. Cody was successfully put back onto terra firma. Thanks to this and other past courses taken through Equine Guelph, Karen also knew to monitor Cody's vitals and health after his incident and then thoroughly debrief the situation. "It's in the details, when you can make a plan and work through it," said Karen who was more than satisfied with how her training turned into action and a successful rescue at Cody's time of need. With Dr. Rebecca Gimenez, a world leader in large animal emergency rescue, a 2-day Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue awareness hands-on seminar will be offered Oct 3 - 4 at Grand River Raceway in Elora, Ontario. It is appropriate for a very broad audience - horse owners, first responders, law enforcement, animal control officers, veterinarians, veterinary technicians, emergency animal response teams, livestock producers and associations. Participants will be taken through the do's and don'ts of large animal rescue and guided through a variety of emergency simulations including plenty of hands on demonstrations. Registration is limited and there is an early bird special $179 until July 15, 2015. For more information about this program feel free to contact Susan Raymond slraymon@uoguelph.ca and also see article:Awareness Training for Large Animal Rescue - Always Expect the Unexpected for an overview of the first TLAER operations level program hosted in Ontario by Equine Guelph. Jackie Bellamy-Zions Equine Guelph | 50 McGilvray St | Guelph | Ontario | N1G 2W1 | Canada

Cream Ridge, NJ ~ The Standardbred Retirement Foundation (SRF) invites all equine enthusiasts to our Meet and Greet on Friday, June 12th from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. Please join us even if adoption is not currently something you are interested in, but enjoy the company of beautiful horses and breathtaking country scenery. At our event you will be able to browse our equine themed merchandise, view our horses under saddle and interact with our 40 plus gorgeous, friendly horses. SRF is now entering our 26th year and we are very excited to present a great selection of horses ready for their forever homes at our open house. From 6:00-7:00 pm many will be shown under saddle both Western and English disciplines with our trainer and volunteers. Presently our selection is the most diverse and abundant as this is our busy season. Staff will be on hand to answer questions regarding our organization, upcoming events, volunteer opportunities and information regarding horse sponsorship. We are running an adoption Summer Savings Special where all full use rideables have an adoption donation of $450.00 plus a $50.00 equestrian merchandise gift certificate will be awarded to each adopter. Please spread the word and plan on joining us! At 7:00 pm we will be exhibiting a Standardbred that has recently been retired from racing being put under saddle for the very first time! This demonstration will entail displaying the proper steps that always result in successful transitions from racetrack to riding ring. Our trainer Mali Norbye has over 20 years experience starting young horses of all breeds and continuing their education onto the Grand Prix level in Jumping, Dressage and FEI Western reining. Visit our Facebook page the morning of the event to check any weather related date changes. Our rain date will be the following Friday June 19th. If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at admin@srfmail.com or call our office at (732) 446-4422. Visit our website www.AdoptaHorse.org for adoption applications and to get a glimpse of some of our adoptables. Now that the weather is cooperating, our site will be updated frequently with many of our new horses. This will be a great time to meet our many wonderful horses and enjoy an equine evening! See you there! Standardbred Retirement Foundation | 353 Sweetmans Lane, Suite 101 | Millstone Twp. | NJ | 08535

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