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When it comes to harness racing, Bud Hatfield wouldn't trade the feeling he gets from his horses for the world. In the past several years, the 69-year-old Ohioan has shared in ownership of a number of successful horses, including millionaire Bar Hopping and stakes-winners Wolfgang and You Know You Do. In December, he reached new heights when his Kissin In The Sand was named the 2018 Dan Patch Award winner for best 3-year-old female pacer. "It just doesn't get any better than this," Hatfield said. "I feel like a kid again." Kissin In The Sand is the first Dan Patch Award winner for Hatfield, who shares ownership of the now 4-year-old mare with Marvin Katz. Kissin In The Sand, trained by Nancy Johansson, won 10 of 15 races last year and never finished worse than second while earning $845,495 in purses. She will be among the honorees at the U.S. Harness Writers Association's Dan Patch Award banquet on Feb. 24 in Orlando. Her wins included a memorable performance in the James M. Lynch Memorial at The Downs at Mohegan Sun Pocono, where she was parked out from post nine for nearly the entire mile before passing Youaremycandygirl in deep stretch to win by a neck. Four months later, she nearly duplicated that effort in the Breeders Crown, parked out from post nine at the same track, but finished second. "People couldn't believe she won (the Lynch) and in the Breeders Crown everybody still thought she was the best horse," Hatfield said. "It was just a tough trip out there. Still to hang in there and be second was great. "It was almost like she was the people's horse because when she races she's so gritty. She's just a fun horse to watch." Other victories in 2018 for Kissin In The Sand included the Mistletoe Shalee, the Bluegrass Stakes, a division of the Glen Garnsey Stakes, and the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes championship. For her career, the daughter of Somebeachsomewhere-Kiss Me Kate has won 17 of 29 starts and $1.07 million. Kissin In The Sand seen below is the first Dan Patch Award winner for Hatfield "Nancy did such a great job with this horse and they're like bonded," Hatfield said. "She had a lot of confidence in her and it showed up in her 3-year-old year. She came on to be a monster. She didn't put in a bad race. She never really threw in a bad race. She was just as consistent as heck. It's just a great feeling to be part of a horse like that." Hatfield, who owns 20 horses, hopes the feeling continues in 2019 when Kissin In The Sand returns for her 4-year-old campaign. "Hopefully we'll have some fun like last year," Hatfield said. "We've got our fingers crossed. "Marvin is a great person," he added. "I've got such good partners, with all my horses. I used to buy my horses by myself and when it's good it's good but when you hit the bottom it hurts. This levels everything out and you have just as much fun. It's just been a great experience." Hatfield was one of harness racing's top amateur drivers, getting started in the mid-1990s, and a two-time champion on the Billings circuit, where he was known as "Trader Bud" because of his career as a car dealer. He last drove in 2014. "I miss the driving a lot," Hatfield said. "Every time I go to the races I get that lump in my throat. But this (success with the horses as an owner) makes up for it." Hatfield does not rule out a return to the sulky, but is in no rush. In addition to owning horses, he enjoys spending his time with wife Kelli on frequent fishing expeditions. "Right now we're having a lot of fun," Hatfield said. "We fish a lot, every chance we get. We fish and we go watch the horses. It's a good combo. Everything is going good. The horses are exciting. I've had good horses in the past, but not the caliber of horses like I've had the last three or four years. I'm excited as I've ever been. "I'm in a good spot, is what I'm trying to say," he added with a laugh. One he wouldn't trade. Ken Weingartner  

Marcus Melander's name will be on the U.S. Harness Writers Association's 2018 Rising Star Award, but the 27-year-old trainer says the recognition extends beyond one person. "It's a great accomplishment, but it's not really just my award," Melander said. "It's my whole barn. If I didn't have all these people working with me, I wouldn't do any good. That's why we've been having success; it's a lot because of them. We have a good team. And then you need to have owners that support you. That's very important, too. I'm lucky to have owners that support me a hundred percent." Melander, who joined Nancy Johansson as the only trainers to receive the Rising Star Award in the past 20 years, saw his stable earn $2.86 million in purses last year, good enough to finish 15th among all trainers in North America despite having the fifth-fewest starts (219) among all trainers in the top 50. His top horse was undefeated male trotter Gimpanzee, who saw his 9-for-9 campaign at age 2 rewarded with the division's Dan Patch Award. Gimpanzee's victories for owners Anders Ström's Courant Inc. and Lennart Agren's S R F Stable included the Breeders Crown and New York Sire Stakes championship. Melander's stable also saw 2-year-old male trotter Green Manalishi S win the William Wellwood Memorial and finish second in both the Breeders Crown and Peter Haughton Memorial. Another male 2-year-old trotter, Greenshoe, won the New Jersey Sire Stakes title. "We had a really good year, especially with the 2-year-olds," Melander sad. "We didn't have that many 3-year-olds, but the 2-year-olds did great." In addition, older trotters Cruzado Dela Noche and Crazy Wow -- both July additions to Melander's stable -- posted top Grand Circuit triumphs, with Cruzado Dela Noche capturing the Yonkers International Trot and Crazy Wow the Maple Leaf Trot. Those wins came at odds of 30-1 and 31-1, respectively. "We had a little luck getting Crazy Wow and Cruzado Dela Noche in the middle of the summer," Melander said. "You've got to have a little luck in the races, but both those horses raced great on those particular days." Melander, who employs a staff of a dozen people, enters 2019 with 60 horses in training and is looking to build off last year's success. "(Gimpanzee and Green Manalishi S) are doing very good," Melander said. "I brought them back in early December so they've been training for over a month now. They filled out very nicely. They're probably going to grow a little bit more during the winter. I'm very happy with how they're feeling so far." Greenshoe, Gerry, and Demon Onthe Hill add depth to Melander's group of male 3-year-old trotters. Greenshoe was limited to four starts last year because of immaturity and sickness while Gerry and Demon Onthe Hill both were winners on the Pennsylvania-stakes circuit. "Hopefully (Greenshoe) will mature more during the winter and develop a little bit too," Melander said. "He's a very fast horse, probably the fastest of any of my horses out of the 3-year-olds, but he was a little too anxious last year. He's been very quiet here at home. He's doing good. I couldn't be any happier with him at this moment. We'll see in three months. "The 3-year-old colts look really good. Gerry was a really good horse last year and Demon Onthe Hill is a nice horse too. He might be a little bit under the best, best ones, but I think we have at least four of them that could be top Grand Circuit horses." Among Melander's 2-year-olds are two high-priced female trotters, Fifty Cent Piece (who sold for $500,000 at the Standardbred Horse Sale) and Bellareina Dolce ($400,000 at the Lexington Selected Sale). Both are owned by Lennart Agren's S R F Stables. Melander, the nephew of trainer Stefan Melander, came to the U.S. from Sweden less than six years ago and worked for trainer Jimmy Takter before starting his own stable in late 2014. He is based in New Egypt, N.J., at a farm that was home previously to each the legendary Stanley Dancer and Continental Farms stables. He got his first Grand Circuit win in 2016 with trotter Long Tom, who was a 2-year-old at the time. The following year, Long Tom was joined by 3-year-old Enterprise and 2-year-old Fourth Dimension in adding to Melander's Grand Circuit resume. Fourth Dimension, who was injured last year and retired, ended 2017 as the Dan Patch Award winner for best 2-year-old male trotter. "We built (the stable) up, no rush really," Melander said. "The first year we had 10 horses, then 25, then 40 to 45 and now we have 60. And you get better horses. It really started that year we got Long Tom and Enterprise. They had success. And then we had Fourth Dimension. Those horses really put you on the map. "Everything has been developing great, really. I'm still developing too. I still have things to learn, it will come with age. Hopefully I've got many years left in this sport." Melander will be among the honorees at the U.S. Trotting Association's Dan Patch Awards banquet on Feb. 24 at Rosen Shingle Creek resort in Orlando, Fla., at which time Trotter, Pacer and Horse of the Year will be revealed. For more information about the resort and banquet visit the U.S. Trotting Association's website.   Ken Weingartner Media Relations Manager U.S. Trotting Association www.ustrotting.com @harnessracenews @HarnessKenW      

Hightstown, NJ — Bruce Ranger, who returned to harness racing in October following a three-year absence, will see a lot of new — and younger — faces when he participates in the third annual $25,000 North America Drivers Championship at Miami Valley Raceway. The 59-year-old Ranger is the elder statesman of the event, which features 30 drivers in a three-day competition that begins Sunday. Nineteen of the 30 drivers are age 40 or younger, including 2018 Driver of the Year Aaron Merriman and North America Drivers Championship defending champion Trace Tetrick. The others in that group are Simon Allard, Joe Bongiorno, Billy Davis Jr., Dexter Dunn, J. Bradley Harris, Travis Henry, Bob McClure, Frank Milby, Drew Monti, Anthony Napolitano, Jeff Nisonger, Dan Noble, Chris Page, Jeremy Smith, Tyler Smith, Josh Sutton, and Jimmy Whittemore. Ranger, who drove nearly exclusively at Pompano Park in the five years prior to his now-abandoned retirement, is unfamiliar with many of them. “A lot of them, it will be all new to me,” Ranger said, adding with a laugh, “I think I’d have a better chance racing with their fathers probably. “I’m excited. It will be fun. Something different, for sure.” Ranger has won 8,959 races in his career, which began in his native Maine in 1978. He enjoyed success in New England and the Delaware Valley before becoming the all-time leading driver at Pompano Park. He is in the Florida and New England halls of fame. In 2015, Ranger decided it was time to retire from racing as the result of the wear-and-tear on his body. He returned to Maine with no thoughts of driving ever again. But last summer Ranger began driving the starting gate on the state’s fair circuit and soon found the competitive juices starting to flow. “Nobody was more surprised than me,” Ranger said about his return to the sulky. “After about three weeks at the fairs, I started to get the itch to race again. It definitely wasn’t in my plans. It was really something. I can’t say it hasn’t been fun. It gets the adrenaline going again.” Ranger has won 43 of 179 races since his return. His participation in the competition at Miami Valley will be his first action of 2019. For the event, each driver has four randomly drawn horses and post positions on each of the first two programs. Following Monday afternoon’s results the top 10 in points will advance to Tuesday’s championship round and race head-to-head starting with a clean scoring slate over eight races on the card. Thirty points are awarded to the winner of each contest race with 20-14-11-9-7-5-3-1 points earned for second through ninth place finishes. Although Ranger is unfamiliar personally with many of the drivers, he respects them and what they’ve accomplished. “These guys work hard,” Ranger said. “Look at Aaron Merriman. He drives well over 4,000 times a year. I don’t even know how that’s possible. He’s got to be tough.” Ranger plans to remain in New England to race, although he would consider driving in Ohio this winter if he could get opportunities. “Florida was real good to me, but I’ve earned my wings,” Ranger said. “I just wasn’t happy there anymore. It just wasn’t working for me. I enjoy the cooler weather and the seasons. I didn’t realize how much I missed them until I got back north. I do some outdoors stuff, some biking and skiing. I grew up doing that. “I’m not sure how it’s going to go. There’s a lot of racing in Ohio. I’m going to see how it feels this weekend. If it looks like I can get work maybe I’ll stay and race for a bit. It’s pretty quiet in New England at this time of year. We’ll see what happens. It’s going to be fun. I was out of the loop for a while. At this point in time, I’m rested and not all banged up and burned out. It’s exciting to go.” by Ken Weingartner, USTA Media Relations Manager

When harness racing owner Brad Grant heard the news last April about the accident that claimed the lives of 16 people aboard a bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team, he knew he wanted to help. Grant, whose own involvement in Canadian junior hockey stretches more than three decades, was uncertain what to do, but came upon the answer as he looked at a page of racing entries. Earlier in the year, Grant had bought a pacer named Humboldt. Grant decided to donate the horse's earnings for the remainder of the month to the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League Assistance Program, which was created to raise funds for all people affected by the accident. Humboldt, the horse, raised $15,000 for the fund. Horse owner Tom Rankin also contributed purse earnings to the program, pushing the figure to nearly $25,000. For his efforts, Grant has been named the 2018 recipient of the January Davies Humanitarian Award presented by the U.S. Harness Writers Association. The award was created in 2008 by U.S. Harness Writers Association member Callie Davies-Gooch in memory of her daughter to recognize contributions beyond harness racing. "Brad is the epitome of what this award is about," Davies-Gooch said. "His work in the community, not only in this instance but in many others, is a great example of humanitarianism and he is a perfect choice for this award." Grant, a resident of Milton, Ontario, said he was surprised by the recognition. "I think there are a lot of good people that do a lot of good things, but I'm honored," Grant said. "I've known Callie all my life. To receive this in memory of her daughter is really quite an honor." Grant, the leading owner on the Woodbine Entertainment circuit in 2018, is also on the volunteer board of the Milton District Hospital Foundation, which raises funds for facilities and equipment. In addition, Grant has held several positions in the Ontario Hockey Association, including chairman. In 1986, he purchased the Milton Merchants junior hockey club and saved the team from folding. The Merchants won four division titles, three league championships, and a provincial crown before Grant sold the team in 2001. In November, Grant was inducted into the Milton Sports Hall of Fame for his work with the program. It was his connection to junior hockey that fueled his desire to help the people affected by the Humboldt tragedy. "Hockey has been a big part of my life and I know many of the people out there in junior hockey," Grant said. "That's something people are never going to forget; it's a tragedy beyond tragedies. To be able to get something going and support those who are going to need help down the road, my wife and I are very big supporters of health care in our local community at the hospital, so it was a no-brainer for us to do something. In my mind it was the least we could do." On the racetrack, Grant enjoyed a banner year. In February, his horses won three 2017 O'Brien Awards - Stay Hungry, Bettor's Up, and Sandbetweenurtoes. His highlight on the track came in August when he watched filly Atlanta win the Hambletonian, but he also owned multiple-stakes-winner Stay Hungry and six-figure-earners Babes Dig Me, Dr J Hanover, Easy Lover Hanover, Captain Trevor, B Yoyo, Witch Dali, Bettor's Up, Captain Ahab, and Missle Hill. In December, Atlanta was named the Dan Patch Award-winner for best 3-year-old female trotter. "There were a lot of highs this year," Grant said. "It's going to be hard to top, but I'd sure love to give it a try. We're hoping for good things for some of our 3-year-olds coming back and it looks like we have a nice crop of (2-year-olds). They're all going good, which at this time of year it's really hard to get excited, but they seem to know what they're supposed to do and their breeding says they should know what to do so we'll keep our fingers crossed. "It's going to be hard to top last year, but just to be a part of it, that's the exciting part." Ken Weingartner Media Relations Manager U.S. Trotting Association  

There are a few days left to submit nominations for the 2018 Caretaker of the Year. The award, in its fourth year of sponsorship by Hard Rock Rocksino Northfield Park (HRRNP) in conjunction with the United States Harness Writers Association (USHWA), recognizes the unsung heroes of the sport - the caretakers who maintain the health and welfare of the horses on a daily basis. Any caretaker working for any stable or farm in North America is eligible. All that is need to nominate is a letter or email, 200 words minimum, from an individual or group detailing the skills and special qualities of the caretaker. All nomination letters and emails must be received and/or postmarked by Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, and sent to chairman Bojarski at a159star@gmail.com or mailed to Tim Bojarski, 7523 Maple Road, Akron, N.Y. 14001. The HRRNP Caretaker of the Year will receive a cash prize of $500, a trophy, and transportation costs to the USHWA Dan Patch Awards banquet in Orlando, Fla., on Sunday evening, Feb. 24, 2019, where he or she will be recognized. The winner will also enjoy a two-night stay at Rosen Shingle Creek, host hotel for the USHWA activities, as well as two complimentary dinner tickets. The winner will be chosen by a seven-person selection committee comprised of USHWA members, all of whom are former caretakers: Tim Bojarski (chair), Tom Charters, Moira Fanning, Dean Hoffman, Rob Pennington, Kim Rinker and Shawn Wiles. (USHWA)   Ken Weingartner

Trenton, NJ — Pretty much everyone who knows Ken Weingartner in the harness racing business likes and respects him. At the same time, pretty much no one knows of the hidden talent he has been harboring for these many years. Weingartner, the award-winning Media Relations Manager at the United States Trotting Association, works tirelessly at publicizing and writing about Standardbred racing in his trademark easy-going, humble manner. He’s not the kind of guy one would ever expect to get on stage in front of a theatre full of people for an entire month. Yet that is exactly where Weingartner can be found throughout December as a member of the ensemble in the highly acclaimed version of “A Christmas Carol” at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, N.J. The production has drawn Tony-award winning actors to play the lead characters and gets rave reviews from media outlets stretching from Philadelphia to New York. In the middle of it all this year is Weingartner in the dual role of a poor townsperson and the baker at Mr. Fezziwig’s Christmas party. On stage for an approximate total of 15 minutes, he sings and dances in several feel-good numbers that have the audience clapping their hands and smiling. And he dances good. The man has rhythm! It doesn’t end there, as Weingartner also performs, in-character, in a pre-show engagement in the lobby helping to lead family activities. He is also part of the bell choir in the audience that opens the second act. This is so far from interviewing Jimmy Takter or taking photos of Hannelore Hanover that it just blows people’s minds. Including Weingartner’s. “I would say most people are definitely stunned,” he said. “I can’t say I blame them. When I found out I would be part of the ensemble I was stunned myself. “I never once thought about it. I never thought it was possible.” With good reason. Weingartner had never attended a performance at McCarter despite living within 20 minutes of it his entire life. Not to mention, his acting resume consisted of playing a traveling salesman as a 4th-grader in a production of “The Music Man” at Hightstown’s Walter C. Black Elementary School. But as the old saying goes, behind every successful man lies a woman. Ken had always been a huge fan of “A Christmas Carol,” Charles Dickens’ classic tale of redemption on Christmas Eve. So, last year his wife, Lana, took him to see the performance in Princeton. “I’ve always liked the story and it’s something I’ve turned to, either in movies, audio books, or the novella, every year at Christmastime,” he said. “When we were at the show and I heard about the Community Ensemble, I joked with Lana, ‘I should do that.’ And she said, ‘You should.’” Lana began watching for audition information and coaxed her husband into it. He attended a workshop to learn more about the ensemble and the process. “It was fun, and everyone from McCarter was so encouraging, that I decided to continue and audition,” Weingartner said. “I was thrilled when I got a call-back. I figured anything that happened after that was a bonus. I knew they were going to only select 23 adults for the ensemble, so I didn’t go into it with any grand expectations. I was hoping to be selected, but I really just wanted to have fun with it and try something outside my comfort zone. As it turned out, I felt comfortable rather quickly, which I think is a credit to the people from McCarter and the other people that auditioned. The auditioning alone was a remarkable experience.” Greg Wood (center) with members of the 2018 cast and community ensemble of A Christmas Carol. McCarter Theatre Center photo. That’s not surprising, as this is much more than just a community theatre play. Greg Wood, who plays Scrooge, has appeared in such films as “The Sixth Sense” and “Signs” and popular TV shows “Law & Order” and “How to Get Away with Murder.” Steve Rattazzi, who plays Fezziwig, was in Broadway’s “Indecent.” Numerous others have performed in off-Broadway shows and in highly respected venues throughout the country. No one acted big time, however, as they embraced the Standardbred Kid as one of their own. “Every person associated with the show has been wonderful to work with,” Weingartner said. “From day one, it was really about bonding and becoming a family. Especially with the amount of time you spend together for two months. People have been nothing but friendly, helpful, encouraging — simply positive. And it really has been a collaborative effort.” That collaboration is what made it more comfortable for Ken to ease into it all. “It didn’t matter if you had no experience, the director (Adam Immerwahr) and the entire team putting the production together wanted to see what you could bring to your characters, telling little stories within the larger story,” Weingartner said. “I think that’s what makes the community ensemble work. I think the idea is to assemble a group that is representative of the community, not to put together a group to simply represent a community. You can see the result, on stage and off.” Rehearsals started on Nov. 9 and were held all day on Saturdays and Sundays before they increased to weeknights during the final week leading up to the actual performances, which run Dec. 4-29. There are 33 shows in all, running for two hours with a 20-minute intermission. When the curtain rose for Weingartner’s first performance, he handled it as calmly as writing up Friday night results at The Meadowlands. “I was more excited than nervous,” he said. “Of course, there was some anxiousness because I’d never done a show before, but you’re so well prepared that it really fills you with confidence and helps you focus. I think doing the pre-show activities also helps because you get to interact with the audience before getting on stage. Walking out on stage for the first time was definitely a special moment. It still is special each time I do it.” What makes it special is not just his participation, but watching the professionals around him. Weingartner has gained a whole new appreciation for actors and their craft. “Absolutely,” he said. “Not only from the standpoint of preparation, but from bringing energy to each performance day after day, often times twice a day. It really is demanding.” And, much like a harness race, where that perfect trip is so hard to obtain, live theatre is filled with potential pitfalls. Thus the drivers, er, actors, must overcome adversity on the fly. “It is live and not everything will go as planned every time,” Weingartner continued. “To see their ability to adjust, and do it so it goes unnoticed by the audience, is quite remarkable. And that extends beyond the actors to everyone involved with the production. There is so much that goes on behind the scenes that is amazing and it’s all vital to the success of the show.” What does not surprise most of Weingartner’s friends and colleagues is that he is a man with absolutely no ego. Not the kind of person one would find in the limelight. He feels, however, that he is just one cog in the machine. “My focus was on the experience itself,” he said. “I think the fact I’m part of an ensemble is part of it. It’s not about bringing attention to any one person, it’s a collaborative effort between the group as a whole.” Ken is unsure if he will try it again next year, noting that the time constraints are exhaustive. He is quick to note, however, that this has truly been one of the great experiences of his life. “From the moment it began at the workshop I attended, this has been a blast,” he said. “It’s something a year ago that I never even imagined doing and I’m so glad I took the opportunity to give it a try. Honestly, had I not gotten in the show it still would have been a terrific experience, just getting the chance to do something new and meet the people from McCarter. But to be a part of this show, especially when you get feedback from people about how much they enjoy it, is an honor. I truly love this production and the people involved in it, so being any part of it is the thrill of a lifetime. I’ll never forget these moments, these people, and I’ll be forever grateful for getting this chance.” In a way, Weingartner’s stage career mirrors that of his day job. If he is not entertaining fans of harness racing with informative stories and photos, he is entertaining a holiday audience with his choreography. And still a harness guy at heart, he is able to merge the two with one line from the play. “Actually,” he said, “I do like that Bob Cratchit says ‘I was (Tiny) Tim’s trotter all the way from church.’” by Rich Fisher, USTA Web Newsroom Senior Correspondent

The best of harness racing journalism in 2018 will be honored with the 57th edition of the John Hervey Awards for writing, the 35th edition of the Broadcasters Award and the 19th edition of the George Smallsreed Awards for photography. The deadline for entries is 5 p.m. today (Dec. 10). Entries will be accepted for news/commentary writing, feature writing, broadcasting, race photography and feature photography. Entries published or broadcast between Dec. 1, 2017 and Nov. 30, 2018, are eligible. All entries must be in English. Judges in each category will select a winner and, where appropriate, up to two honorable mentions. There are no entry fees or cash prizes. Winners will be announced in January and will be recognized at the U.S. Harness Writers Association's annual Dan Patch Awards festivities Feb. 24 in Orlando. Winners will receive a plaque/trophy as well as two dinner tickets to the Dan Patch Awards dinner. Photo and written submissions must have appeared in a paid-circulation publication or on the website that is the same-name affiliate of a paid-circulation publication, recognized broadcast news organization or established industry/news website. Content that appeared on personal websites, message boards or lists and similar entities is not valid for inclusion in the competition. The final decision on eligibility is in the hands of the Hervey Committee. Broadcast entries will be accepted feature or live racing segment no longer than 10 minutes. The entry must have aired on a network television or cable station, recognized news and/or industry website, or have been included in a racetrack's simulcasting presentation. Documentaries or other long-form productions are not eligible although one segment of that documentary, edited only to fit the length limitations of no more than 10 minutes, may be submitted for consideration. The awards are not open to entries that are fiction, in the form of Q&As, or were prepared for commercial purposes (for advertisements/promo/publicity purposes). There is a limit of one submission per person per category. A person may enter more than one category, but not with the same submission. An entry may only be submitted in one category and the category must be indicated clearly. The Hervey Committee, at its discretion, may disqualify an entry at any time in the process, and reserves the right not to bestow an award in a particular category based on the quality and quantity of entries. All entries must originate with the author/photographer/producer and must include a signed cover letter expressing the wish to enter materials in the contest and granting permission for the materials to be used for promoting the awards in press releases. The letter must also include the following contact information for the writer/producer/photographer: name, full address, telephone numbers (home, office, cell) and email address. The letter must also include the date that the media organization published/aired the submission and specify the category for which the entry is being submitted. Editors may submit entries provided the cover letter includes contact information for the writer/producer/photographer as well as for the person submitting the entry. All other third-party entries will be rejected. Written entries must specify the category - news or feature - for consideration. All print entries must include a tear sheet of the entry (a PDF is acceptable) as it appeared in print and a plain text version with no identifying information (bylines, publication name, graphs, photos or other graphic elements). Broadcast entries must not exceed 10 minutes and must not contain commercials. Each submission (one per person or organization) should have a cover letter. Photography entries must include a cover letter designating the category for the photo - race or feature - and a tear sheet of the published photo, showing the date, name of publication and photographer's name. Tear sheets for Internet-based submissions will consist of a screen shot. Photographs should not be digitally enhanced beyond the basics needed to achieve realistic color balance and sharpness. Failure to follow these rules will result in disqualification. The decisions of the Hervey Committee and the judges are final. Email entries, or file shared for broadcast, should be sent to ken.weingartner@ustrotting.com. Questions can be directed to Ken Weingartner, chairman of the Hervey Committee, at the above email address. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA 

Goshen, NY - David Reid, who heads up Preferred Equine Sales Agency, was elected president of the Standardbred Transition Alliance at the first meeting of that group, held Tuesday (Nov. 27) at the Harness Racing Museum and Hall of Fame in Goshen, N.Y. Reid, though his work with Preferred, has sold tens of thousands of Standardbreds at public and private auction, both as a consignment agency and sales manager of Tattersalls and Lexington Selected Yearling Sales Company in Lexington, Ky. and at The Meadowlands. He also breeds and races Standardbreds. "This is a long overdue initiative that will take cooperation of the entire industry and I'm optimistic that, over time, it will make a big difference for our horses and the groups that serve them. It will also give donors confidence that they're supporting groups with solid operational practices," said Reid. "I am honored by the confidence of my fellow board members and look forward to working with all of them." Committees were formed to advance fundraising for and accreditation of groups helping horses in transition from traditional uses. The STA will provide grants to cover partial funding of 501(c)(3) groups serving Standardbreds and ensure they utilize best practices for equine care and financial management through an accreditation process. The STA will adapt the established model used to accredit and partially fund 70 groups serving Thoroughbreds, the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance. The STA is a self-standing organization that has applied for 501(C)(3) status and is a registered charity with the Ohio Secretary of State and Attorney General. Moira Fanning, chief operations officer at The Hambletonian Society, was elected vice president, Mitchel Skolnick of Bluestone Farm will serve as treasurer and Elizabeth Caldwell of Cane Run Farm will be secretary. The board members are Rick Moore of Hoosier Park, Kelly Young of the New York Sire Stakes, Kevin Greenfield of the Ohio Harness Horsemen's Association and Hickory Lane Farm, Michelle Crawford of Crawford Farm, Dr. Bridgette Jablonsky of Hanover Shoe Farm, Bill Abdelnour of the New England Amateur Harness Drivers Club, Dr. Donna Franchetti, Standardbred owner and veterinarian, and Dr. Patty Hogan of Hogan Equine Clinic. Ken Weingartner Media Relations Manager

Hightstown, NJ — Dorsoduro Hanover began his season with a win and will try to go out the same way in Thursday’s $260,000 Hap Hansen Progress Pace for harness racing 3-year-old pacers at Dover Downs. It will not be easy. In addition to facing seven talented rivals, Dorsoduro Hanover will begin the race from post No. 8, the least favorable starting spot on the gate at the track. “I’m not too happy about that,” said driver Matt Kakaley, who will try to guide Dorsoduro Hanover to victory from a post that has produced only four winners from 100 starts during the current Dover Downs meet. “The eight hole is going to be tough. But it should be a good race for everybody to watch. There is a lot of speed in there.” Dorsoduro Hanover, the sport’s richest 3-year-old with $1.25 million in purses this year, is the 5-2 second choice on the morning line. Jimmy Freight, who defeated Dorsoduro Hanover by a neck in last week’s Progress Pace elimination, is the 2-1 favorite. He will start from post No. 7 with driver Scott Zeron. This Is The Plan and driver Tim Tetrick are 9-2 and will leave from post three. “This Is The Plan will be pushing for sure; I know Scotty will be leaving and I’m not taking back, so there’s going to be some action,” Kakaley said. “I don’t know how it will all shake out in the first turn, but there will be enough guys leaving, that’s for sure.” The Ron Burke-trained Dorsoduro Hanover has won 10 of 21 races this year, finished second on six occasions and third once. His wins include the Breeders Crown, Adios, Pennsylvania Sire Stakes championship, and an elimination of the Little Brown Jug. He finished second in the Little Brown Jug final and also was runner-up in the Meadowlands Pace and a division of the Tattersalls Pace. The gelding has finished off the board only once in his past 10 starts, a fourth in the Nov. 15 Matron Stakes at Dover, where he was beaten by a neck. He is owned by Burke Racing, the group of Silva, Purnel & Libby, the Weaver Bruscemi partnership, and Wingfield Five. “He’s had a long year and he’s still racing good,” Kakaley said about Dorsoduro Hanover, who made his seasonal debut on May 5. “Ronnie has done an amazing job keeping him sharp like this. He raced great last week, another first-over trip and he dug in hard all the way to the wire. You can’t really fault him. He usually gives you what he’s got. “He’s had a tremendous year, there’s no doubt about that. He’s got the most money made, he’s been knocking on the door the whole year, racing hard the whole year, and he’s always right there. A couple of the other ones were good early and not so good late, or vice versa, but he’s been pretty consistent the whole year.” In addition to the Progress Pace, Dover on Thursday hosts Delaware Standardbred Breeders Fund championships for 2-year-old pacers and trotters. The Progress Pace was renamed in 2015 to honor the late W.E. “Hap” Hansen, a Dover Downs and Brandywine Raceway executive who passed away the previous year. Following is the field for the Hap Hansen Progress Pace in post-position order. PP-Horse-Sire-Driver-Trainer-Morning Line 1 - Shnitzledosomethin - Fred And Ginger - David Miller - Dylan Davis - 15/1 2 - Heavenly Sound - Rock N Roll Heaven - Victor Kirby - Bruce Saunders - 12/1 3 - This Is The Plan - Somebeachsomewhere - Tim Tetrick - Ron Burke - 9/2 4 - Thinkbig Dreambig - Bettors Delight - Yannick Gingras - Jimmy Takter - 8/1 5 - Done Well - Well Said - Corey Callahan - Ron Burke -10/1 6 - I’m A Big Deal - Somebeachsomewhere - Eric Carlson - Chris Ryder - 12/1 7 - Jimmy Freight - Sportswriter - Scott Zeron - Andrew Harris -2/1 8 - Dorsoduro Hanover - Somebeachsomewhere - Matt Kakaley - Ron Burke - 5/2 by Ken Weingartner, USTA Media Relations Manager

Hightstown, NJ — Harness racing trainer Ron Burke saw his stable surpass $20 million in purses for the sixth consecutive year when Sonnet Grace won the Goldsmith Maid Stakes for 2-year-old female trotters over the weekend at The Meadowlands. The 49-year-old Burke is the only trainer in harness racing history to ever reach $20 million in a year. His stable earned a record $28.4 million in 2014. This season Burke’s stable leads the sport in both purses, with $20.2 million, and wins, with 917. No other trainer has won more than 344 races or $8.56 million. It will be Burke’s 10th consecutive year at the top of both categories. Burke has exceeded 900 wins five times in his career, including a record 1,093 victories in 2014. For his career, Burke has won a record 9,369 races and a record $211 million in purses. by Ken Weingartner, USTA Media Relations Manager

East Rutherford, NJ - Captain Crunch and driver Scott Zeron tipped three wide coming off the final turn and powered through the stretch to win the $469,300 Governor's Cup for 2-year-old male pacers by 3-3/4 lengths over Mac's Power in 1:50.3 on a wet Saturday night at the Meadowlands Racetrack. Blood Money finished third. The Governor's Cup was one of the Fall Final Four events for 2-year-old pacers and trotters at the Big M. Southwind Avenger won the $435,900 Valley Victory for male trotters while Sonnet Grace captured the $490,000 Goldsmith Maid for female trotters and Prescient Beauty claimed the $391,250 Three Diamonds for female pacers. All of the races were contested over a sloppy track as the result of persistent rain. In the Governor's Cup, Captain Crunch was fifth through the first half of the race as Escapetothebeach and Mangogh each took a turn on the lead. Captain Crunch followed the cover of Semi Tough around the final turn before moving to the front in the stretch and cruising to victory. Captain Crunch, a son of Captaintreacherous out of Sweet Paprika, has won six of 10 races this year and earned $616,113 for owners 3 Brothers Stables, Christina Takter, Rojan Stables, and Caviart Farms. The colt, who last month won the Breeders Crown, is trained by Nancy Johansson. He was bred by Walnridge Farm and Sherri Meirs. "We really took our time with him," Johansson said. "He's a big growthy colt and there is a lot of money to be made toward the end of the season. We just figured we would take our time and let him come into his own." Johansson purchased Captain Crunch, then known as Captain Bean, for $85,000 at the 2017 Standardbred Horse Sale at the urging of her then 12-year-old daughter, Ella. "She said, 'Whatever you do, you have to buy Captain Bean,'" Johansson said, adding with a laugh, "Great. No pressure. "Luckily I have a good group of owners behind me and we were able to put together a group and purchase the colt and it's been a fairy tale story ever since." Captain Crunch, the 9-5 favorite, paid $5.80 to win. In the Valley Victory, Southwind Avenger upset at odds of 15-1, defeating Chin Chin Hall by a half-length in 1:55.3. Reign Of Honor finished third. Seven Hills, the 2-1 favorite, went off stride entering the final turn. Southwind Avenger, a Southwind Farms-bred son of E L Titan out of Auvergne, has won two of 11 races and earned $355,067 for owners Mel Hartman, David McDuffee, and Little E LLC. The gelding is trained by Richard "Nifty" Norman, who also trains Reign Of Honor, and was driven by Dexter Dunn. "We were looking for something for Canada that we thought would maybe step up there," said McDuffee, who also co-owns Chin Chin Hall. "We've had a lot of luck racing up in Canada. He was a beautiful colt out of a very nice mare. The rest is history, I guess. Nifty has done a wonderful job bringing him along. "One thing about Nifty, he's not in any hurry. He takes his time and lets them develop. When they're ready, he's ready. He just does a really nice job." Southwind Avenger paid $32.40 to win. In the Goldsmith Maid, second favorite Sonnet Grace took the lead on the backstretch and fended off challenges from Evident Beauty and Princess Deo to win by a half-length in 1:54.2. Princess Deo was second and Evident Beauty was third. Yannick Gingras drove Sonnet Grace for trainer Ron Burke. Sonnet Grace, a daughter of Muscle Massive out of I Believe, has won seven of 12 races this year and earned $402,597. She is owned by the Sonnet Grace Stable, which purchased the filly from former owner-trainer-driver Rod Allen in late September. Allen also bred the filly. "Rod Allen is a hell of a horseman and I give a shout out to him because he did a great job getting her broke and trained down," said the ownership group's Howard Taylor. "We got lucky." Sonnet Grace paid $6.40 to win. In the $391,250 Three Diamonds, Prescient Beauty rallied in the stretch to overtake battling leaders Zero Tolerance and Warrawee Ubeaut to win by a half-length in a career-best 1:50.4. Zero Tolerance finished second and even-money favorite Warrawee Ubeaut was third. Doug McNair drove Prescient Beauty to the victory for his dad, trainer Gregg McNair. Prescient Beauty had finished third behind Warrawee Ubeaut and Zero Tolerance in last month's Breeders Crown. Prescient Beauty, a daughter of Art Major out of Precious Beauty, has won five of 13 races this year and earned $439,971 for breeder-owner Jim Avritt Sr. Gregg McNair also trained fourth-place finisher Beautyonthebeach, another Avritt-owned homebred. "They've raced good," McNair said. "They've had a few problems here and there, but they've kept going. They're a good pair of mares." Sent off at 9-2, Prescient Beauty paid $11 to win. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA  

Harness racing's top-ranked horses, No. 1 McWicked and No. 2 Shartin N, head to their respective TVG Series championships Saturday at The Meadowlands Racetrack looking to bolster their Horse of the Year credentials while closing out historic seasons. The Meadowlands hosts four TVG Series finals Saturday, with events also for male and female trotters, and four stakes races for 2-year-olds - the Governor's Cup for colt and gelding pacers, Valley Victory for colt and gelding trotters, Three Diamonds for filly pacers, and Goldsmith Maid for filly trotters. McWicked faces six foes in the $350,000 TVG Series final for male pacers. He starts from post one with Brian Sears driving for trainer Casie Coleman. Shartin N meets seven rivals in the $175,000 TVG Series final for female pacers. She also starts from post one, with Tim Tetrick at the lines for trainer Jim King Jr. Shartin N, who has won 18 of 23 races this year, has already set the record for single-season earnings by an older female pacer, with $968,361, and is attempting to become the first pacing mare to reach $1 million. The New Zealand-bred 5-year-old is owned by Richard Poillucci and Jo Ann Looney-King. McWicked has won 11 of 18 races and earned $1.40 million in 2018. The 7-year-old stallion leads all horses in North America in purses and will be the first horse older than the age of 5 to finish atop the annual money standings since 7-year-old trotter Savoir in 1975. He is owned by Ed James' S S G Stables. Last week, McWicked won the five-horse preferred handicap at The Meadowlands by 2-1/4 lengths over Filibuster Hanover in 1:47.3. He brings a four-race win streak to his TVG final. "I couldn't be any happier," Coleman said. "He was off for three weeks and when we drew the five hole in a five-horse field I expected they would go slow fractions trying to get away on him late. When they hit the half in :53.4 I was pretty happy. I wasn't expecting that fast a mile out of him, but he did it real easy. "He came out of it really good. He was feeling good the next day. Everything seems good. Hopefully we can have a little bit of luck with him on Saturday." McWicked, who was a Dan Patch Award-winner at the age of 3, counts the Breeders Crown Open Pace, Ben Franklin Pace, William R. Haughton Memorial, Canadian Pacing Derby, Dan Rooney Invitational, and Allerage Open Pace among his wins this year. Two fourth-place finishes are his only off-the-board results in his 18 starts. If he were named Horse of the Year, McWicked would be the oldest pacer to ever receive the honor. "To think he was going to do what he did this year would be impossible," Coleman said. "I felt confident he would have a big season, but he's made almost $1.5 million and barely missed the top three. In the starts he got beat, he only got beat from the way the trip went. I've never seen anybody as consistent as he's been week in and week out. "It's not like he has easy miles and he's been at the top of his game since the time he started the season. The horse is 7 years old and racing against the best of the best in the open (class) every week. It's fun every time he goes to the gate. As long as he's healthy and sound we're definitely planning to race him next year." Shartin N prepped for her TVG final with a 1:52.2 win in a qualifier Nov. 14 at Dover Downs. She last raced Oct. 27, winning the Breeders Crown Mare Pace. She also brings a four-race win streak to her TVG event. "She qualified really good the other day, very pleasing," King said. "She doesn't seem to mind the time between races. I think she's OK." In addition to the Breeders Crown, Shartin N's victories this year include the Blue Chip Matchmaker Series championship, Roses Are Red, Lady Liberty, Artiscape, Betsy Ross Invitational, Chip Noble Memorial, and Allerage Farms Mare Pace. If she were named Horse of the Year, Shartin N would be the first pacing mare to ever receive the honor. "I think that's a pretty tall order; McWicked is so sharp right now," King said. "A few weeks ago, I thought it was going to be all about (3-year-old trotting filly) Atlanta, but people have short memories. It's really something just to be even considered, to be in the running. She's gone all year since the Matchmaker (beginning in March) and she hasn't missed yet where she didn't have an excuse or real good reason. Every time she didn't win, something went wrong. "There are so few things through the year that didn't make me smile. It's just a thrill to be around one like her and to think you were a part of it. I'd really love to get over that million-dollar mark; that would be something. You never want to see a year like this end, but she's had quite a year. She's just a horse of a different color. She's pretty damn special." For Saturday's complete Meadowlands entries, click here. First-race post time is 7:15 p.m. (EST). by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA  

Driver Bob McClure and trainer Luc Blais have forged a strong relationship this year, winning 28 percent of their starts together. The partnership has helped McClure make a successful transition from Canada's "B" tracks to the main stage of Woodbine Mohawk Park, not to mention the harness racing Grand Circuit, and aided Blais' bid for career highs for wins and purses. The two will look to add to their accomplishments Saturday (Nov. 17) at the Meadowlands, where Ontario Sire Stakes champion Forbidden Trade takes on seven rivals in the second of two eliminations for the Valley Victory Stakes for 2-year-old male trotters. The top-five finishers from each elim advance to the $435,900 final on Nov. 24 at the Big M. Elimination winners will draw for posts one thorough six. Forbidden Trade, who has won seven of nine races, is the 7-2 second choice on the morning line. He will start from post seven. Seven Hills is the 3-1 favorite, with Corey Callahan driving for trainer John Butenschoen. "He's been top notch all year," McClure said about Forbidden Trade. "He's pretty incredible for a 2-year-old. He looks like a 3-year-old and has the maturity of a 4-year-old. He's never given me any trouble. He's perfect to drive, a complete professional, no matter what kind of trip you give him. He's got the attitude of a good one. "The two races he lost were probably his two best races. One race (a preliminary leg of the sire stakes) he had a lot of bad racing luck and still raced huge. The other time (in a division of the Champlain Stakes) he had some traffic trouble. I didn't have him in good position and he got out of gear a little bit. He still came home :27.1, but he was in no position to win. He could have come home in :26.4 and he still wasn't going to win." Forbidden Trade, by Kadabra out of O'Brien Award-winner Pure Ivory, has earned $213,139 for owner Serge Godin's Determination stable. He brings a four-race win streak to his Valley Victory elimination. "I think the sky is the limit for him," McClure said. "He's been a professional from day one. He's made my job easy. If he's in any position to win he usually gets the job done. He's been fun to drive all year. I think he has the potential to be a top Grand Circuit horse." The 28-year-old McClure led Canada in wins in 2017 and 2016, topping 500 both years, and was third in 2015. This season, with his focus on Woodbine Mohawk, he has won 285 races and a career-best $3.74 million (U.S.) in purses. He ranks third in Canada in both wins and purses. "I'm very happy," McClure said. "I have a lot of people to thank for that. I was really happy where I was (at the smaller tracks) and I was having a lot of fun. But I decided to commit to (Woodbine Mohawk). I wanted to be home with family more. I didn't anticipate picking up the stakes stables I did. I didn't anticipate having as good a year that I've had right off the bat. It's worked out significantly better than I thought it would." Among those on McClure's thank-you list is trainer Dean Nixon, who backed the driver from the earliest days of his transition. "I've driven for him for a long time and he's somebody I've had a really good working relationship with," McClure said. "He's happy with the work I do, and I respect the good job he does. We've always done really well together. It gave me the freedom of being able to make some mistakes during the transition and not worry about him being upset about it. He's always going to be in your corner. "When I picked up Luc Blais, that was the icing on the cake." Blais, who trains exclusively for Determination, is in the midst of his third consecutive million-dollar-season. His 66 wins this year are the third most of his career (his best came in 2000 with 77) and his $1.56 million in purses is also third (his best came last year with $1.85 million). In addition to winning the Ontario Sire Stakes championship with Forbidden Trade, Blais and McClure have captured the Steele Memorial and Joie De Vie with Dream Together. They finished second in the Armbro Flight Stakes with Emoticon Hanover and second in the Ontario Sire Stakes championship with Champagne Jane. "They asked if I wanted to be the driver for Determination stables and I jumped at the opportunity," said McClure, who has driven 163 of Blais' 236 starters. "Serge Godin and Luc Blais are very good people to work for. "I think everyone is real happy with the year we've had." For Saturday's complete Meadowlands entries, click here. Racing begins at 7:15 p.m. (EST). by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

Custom Cantab brings a career-long streak of 28 on-the-board finishes to Thursday's $183,900 Matron Stakes for 3-year-old filly trotters at Dover Downs, which will be the filly's first start at a harness racing track other than Hoosier Park. Custom Cantab, who is 6-1 on the morning line, heads to the event off a win in the Crossroads of America on Nov. 2. The triumph was her 12th in 16 races this season. Trained and co-owned by Chris Beaver, Custom Cantab has 14 wins, 10 seconds and four thirds in her career and earnings of $643,936. In addition to the Crossroads, her victories this year include a division of the Pegasus Stakes and the Indiana Sire Stakes championship. She finished second to Manchego in the Moni Maker Stakes and has not finished worse than second in 13 races since surgery to correct an entrapped epiglottis. Custom Cantab will start the Matron from post six with regular driver Peter Wrenn. Breeders Crown champion Lily Stride is the 2-1 morning-line favorite from post three, with Tim Tetrick driving for trainer Mark Harder. Plunge Blue Chip is the 5-2 second choice from post one with trainer-driver Ake Svanstedt. "We were up in the air whether to start her again, but everything checked out on her and I'd been anxious to see how she would race against a top field to get some perspective," Beaver said. "We plan on racing her next year. She's probably not as valuable as a broodmare as some of those fillies are, but she's a really nice racehorse. "I think she will be staked to some of the mare races and maybe some of the 4-year-old races. I wouldn't be staking to everything. I'd like to space out her starts. Maybe she won't be good enough, but the way she acts, she's never let a horse get away from her. She's always been competitive." Dover Downs host the four Matrons for 3-year-old trotters and pacers Thursday. Racing begins at 4:30 p.m. (EST). Six Pack is the 6-5 morning-line favorite in the $210,150 colt and gelding trot, followed by Met's Hall at 8-5. Dorsoduro Hanover is the 2-1 choice in the $193,750 colt and gelding pace, which also includes Jimmy Freight (5-2) and Lather Up (7-2). Youaremycandygirl is the 5-2 favorite in the $159,350 filly pace, where she will see familiar rivals Alexa's Power (7-2) and Percy Bluechip (9-2). Custom Cantab is a daughter of Mr Cantab out of Custom Model. Beaver bought Custom Model's first foal, the Chocolatier-sired My Ghost Bi, for $3,000 at the 2011 Lexington Selected Sale and the gelding made $75,852 lifetime. Beaver bought Custom Cantab, the mare's third foal, for $6,000 at the 2016 Hoosier Sale. "I knew the family and thought she was something nicer than what the mare had thrown before," Beaver said. "I kind of studied crosses and I thought the mare would cross with Mr Cantab, but I can't say I had any idea she would turn out as good as this. I was just hoping to get a horse that was competitive in the sire stakes." Beaver, who owns Custom Cantab with Donald Robinson and R.B.H. Ventures, is not concerned about the filly going on the road for the first time and racing on a five-eighths-mile oval compared to Hoosier Park's seven-eighths track. "She trains on a little farm track, so she should be all right," Beaver said. "I think she would be good on any size track because even if she was struggling in the turns she would let you help her. She knows what she's supposed to be doing. "She's smart. She can leave all you want and let a horse go, settle in a hole, and follow without using any more energy than necessary. She's been racing on the front a lot lately because she's been the favorite, but she is great off a helmet. She knows how to take care of herself and put herself in position to stay close. She is an extremely professional horse." For Thursday's complete Dover Downs entries, click here. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA 

Hightstown, NJ — None of the horses in the harness racing Hambletonian Society/Breeders Crown poll’s Top 10 were in action last week. Seven-year-old pacing stallion McWicked, the year’s richest horse with $1.39 million in purses, continues in the top spot and had 26 first-place votes. Shartin N is in second place and picked up seven first-place votes. They remaining two first-place votes went to Woodside Charm, who ranks fourth overall behind Atlanta. The Hambletonian Society/Breeders Crown poll does not determine Horse of the Year. The U.S. Harness Writers Association votes in December on all Dan Patch Award division winners plus Trotter of the Year, Pacer of the Year and Horse of the Year. Rankings based on the votes of harness racing media representatives on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis. Hambletonian Society/Breeders Crown Standardbred Poll: Week 25 – 11/13/2018 Rank Name (First Votes) A/G/S Record Earnings Points Pvs 1 McWicked (26) 7ph 17-10-3-2 $1,393,864 340 1 2 Shartin N (7) 5pm 23-18-1-0 $968,361 306 2 3 Atlanta 3tf 14-8-5-1 $1,017,278 246 3 4 Woodside Charm (2) 2tf 7-7-0-0 $521,658 214 4i 5 Kissin In The Sand 3pf 15-10-5-0 $845,495 183 5 6 Gimpanzee 2tc 9-9-0-0 $591,358 141 6 7 Dorsoduro Hanover 3pg 19-10-5-1 $1,229,112 95 7 8 Six Pack 3tc 13-10-1-1 $970,573 80 8 9 Courtly Choice    3pc 16-10-1-0 $910,603 68 9 10 Tactical Landing 3tc 13-8-2-2 $642,800 67 10 Also: Homicide Hunter 59; Warrawee Ubeaut 39; Manchego 18; Jimmy Freight, Marion Marauder 12; Lather Up 11; Captain Crunch, Crystal Fashion, Emoticon Hanover 7; Met’s Hall 6; Plunge Blue Chip 3; Caviart Ally 2; Foiled Again, Lily Stride 1. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

Harrisburg, PA — Gallie Bythe Beach, a 7-year-old pacing mare in foal to Always B Miki, was the top seller Thursday (Nov. 8) during the first session of the Standardbred Horse Sale’s two-day mixed sale. She was purchased for $280,000 by Hanover Shoe Farms. A daughter of Somebeachsomewhere out of the mare Galleria, the stakes-winning Gallie Bythe Beach earned $749,898 during her career in harness racing. She retired in 2016. Her dam was a Dan Patch Award-winner in 1998 and 1999 and added an O’Brien Award in 2000. The family also includes mares Gallic Sea and Gallie Beach, who joined Gallie Bythe Beach on Thursday’s top-sellers list. Gallic Sea, a full sister to Gallie Bythe Beach, was purchased by Shmuel Farhi for $157,000, which was the day’s third-highest price. The 4-year-old mare is in foal to Always B Miki. Gallie Beach, a 4-year-old by Somebeachsomewhere out of stakes-winner Western Gallie, sold for $110,000 to Fair Winds Farm. She also is in foal to Always B Miki. Her dam is a half-sister to Gallie Bythe Beach. Gallie Beach’s price tied for the day’s fourth highest. Coming in at No. 2 on Thursday was 3-year-old trotting filly Danish Girl, who was purchased for $170,000 by Karen Carroll. Danish Girl is a daughter of Credit Winner out of Steamy Windows and a half-sister to undefeated Breeders Crown champion Gimpanzee. She is in foal to Muscle Mass. Rounding out the top five at $110,000 was 4-year-old pacing mare Kate Is Well Said. The mare is a daughter of Well Said out of stakes-winner Just Wait Kate. The family also includes Dan Patch Award-winner Kikikatie. Kate Is Well Said is in foal to Captaintreacherous. One other mare, 4-year-old trotter Pure Kemp, reached six figures. She was purchased for $100,000 by agent Bjorn “Bernie” Noren. Pure Kemp is a daughter of Muscle Hill out of Ally Hall. The family includes O’Brien Award-winner Amigo Hall. Pure Kemp is in foal to Walner. All of the six-figure sellers were consigned by Preferred Equine. Among stallion shares sold Thursday, two shares in Muscle Hill were purchased for $150,000 and $135,000 by Steve Stewart and Fair Winds Farm, respectively. Both shares were consigned by Preferred Equine. One Chapter Seven stallion share sold for $140,000 to Steve Jones and one Captaintreacherous share sold for $125,000 to Tim Klemencic. The Chapter Seven share was consigned by Steiner Stock Farm and the Captaintreacherous share was consigned by Preferred Equine. A stallion share for pacer Lazarus N sold for $50,000 to Urie Byler. The share was donated to the Standardbred Retirement Foundation by Duncan Taylor of Taylor Made Sales and Stallions and Mike Gulotta of Deo Volente Farms. Lazarus N will stand at Deo Volente for the 2019 breeding season. The Standardbred Horse Sale concludes Friday with the second session of the mixed sale at the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Complex. For complete results visit The Black Book. by Ken Weingartner, for the USTA

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