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On 22 June 2017, Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards conducted an inquiry into the activities of unlicensed person Nea Fresenius at the Tabcorp Park Melton race meeting on 17 June 2017. After considering all available evidence, licensed trainer Vince Vallelonga pleaded guilty to a charge under the provisions of Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 90A(2.9)(a) which states:         The holder of a trainer’s license shall ensure that all persons carrying out the activities         of a stable hand are licensed as stable hands. The particulars of the charge being that as a licensed trainer Mr Vallelonga failed to ensure that Nea Fresenius was appropriately licensed when carrying out stablehand activities at Tabcorp Park Melton on 17 June 2017. In assessing penalty Stewards took into account Mr Vallelonga’s guilty plea, that the offence was an isolated episode due to his recent injury and previous penalties for offences under this rule. Stewards accordingly imposed a fine of $200.    After considering all available evidence, Nea Fresenius pleaded guilty to a charge under AHRR 91(1)(a) which states:         A person shall not carry on an activity regulated by licence -                 (a) if that person is not the holder of a current licence; The particulars of the charge being that on 17 June 2017 Ms Fresenius did carry on an activity regulated by licence, namely as a stablehand for trainer Vince Vallelonga, when not the holder of an appropriate licence. In assessing penalty Stewards took into account Ms Fresenius’ guilty plea and previous penalties for offences under this rule. Ms Fresenius was fined $200. Harness Racing Victoria

Today the Norwegian Trotting Association published the verdict in the doping case against French harness racing trainer Fabrice Souloy, who had four trotters test positive for Cobalt in June 2016 at Bjerke, Oslo. Souloy was banned from training and driving for 15 years and fined $60,000. The association had wanted Souloy banned for life and fined $25,000. Souloy is still awaiting a verdict from the Swedish Trotting Association regarding a positive test from the Elitlopp 2016 -- also for Cobalt -- and it was thought that the two Scandinavian associations would have published their verdicts together. However, due to vacation the Swedish verdict is first expected to be known around July 5. At present Souloy is serving a one year ban in France after a positive test for Cobalt. by Karsten Bønsdorf, USTA Senior Newsroom Correspondent

If civil actions had bookies, these horse folks might be 100-to-1 longshots. Three years ago, a group of Ontario racehorse breeders took Kathleen Wynne’s government to court over claims the province made a “bad faith” decision in 2012 to abruptly end a lucrative revenue-sharing agreement with the horse racing industry. The standardbred breeders allege cancellation of the Slots at Racetracks Program damaged their livelihoods. But the rural plaintiffs — who in 2015 notched a legal victory in obtaining government documents tied to the agreement cancellation, as court-ordered disclosure — continue to battle the government. On Monday, the sides are back in a Guelph courthouse. Ontario Superior Court Justice Michael Emery will hear motions from the province and co-defendant Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corp. to quash summonses for 13 witnesses — including Wynne, her predecessor Dalton McGuinty, former finance minister Dwight Duncan and economist Don Drummond. “The evidence shows that these are the folks who are the only ones who can bring any level of transparency to the decision that was made and imposed in 2012,” said Toronto lawyer Jonathan Lisus, who represents the breeders seeking $65 million in damages. “They were directly and personally involved in the decision, its implementation and the response to the harm that was caused.” The province and the OLG deny all allegations of wrongdoing in their statements of defence. Earlier this year, both filed motions to have the case summarily dismissed, a matter scheduled for a November hearing. Emilie Smith, a spokesperson for the Ministry of the Attorney General, said in a written statement that “Ontario has brought a summary judgment motion” to proceed in Superior Court “to have the action dismissed on the basis that it does not raise a genuine issue for trial.” “After Ontario confirmed that it would be bringing a summary judgment motion, the plaintiffs served fifteen summonses to witness,” Smith said. “Ontario has brought a motion to quash thirteen of the fifteen summonses on the basis that the evidence of the summonsed witnesses is not relevant to the summary judgment motion and that the summonses are an abuse of process.” She continued: “As this matter is subject to litigation, it would be inappropriate to comment further.” OLG also declined comment. “It would be inappropriate for OLG to comment on matters before the courts,” said spokesperson Tony Bitonti. The defendants have already deposed 17 plaintiffs. Lisus said his clients want the opportunity to examine current and former senior government officials on their witness list, under oath. “I understand the government may not want this decision-making process to be scrutinized but it (ending the slots agreement) caused a lot of harm to a lot of people,” Lisus said. “The documents and evidence demonstrate they (the defendants) knew it would cause a lot of harm to a lot of people.” Around 1998, the slots agreement grew out of the Ontario government’s interest in installing the machines at racetracks. In 2012, then-finance minister Dwight Duncan announced the revenue-sharing deal would be scrapped. With a year’s notice to the horse racing industry, it officially ceased in 2013. Up to that point, horse racing’s share of slots revenue was about $4 billion. A key component of the breeders’ allegations hinges on the five-to-seven-year cycle needed to produce a standardbred racing horse from conception to the start gate. They claim the breeding cycle was well-known to the defendants, who also understood that breeders plan their businesses on this timeline. Lisus said the government’s one-year notice to end the slots deal devastated breeders, noting “the value of horses completely halved overnight.” “It’s not the plaintiffs’ position that the revenue share had to continue forever or could never be renegotiated,” the lawyer said. “The way the government did it, which was to essentially give no notice and say revenue sharing is going to stop, caused the bottom to fall entirely out of the market, and it never came back,” Lisus continued. “The documents show they knew that would happen.” The breeders claim that information contained in the court-ordered disclosure shows senior government officials were planning to cancel the slots program “without warning” even while the province was reassuring the horse industry that the partnership would continue, according to the plaintiffs’ responding factum to the motion to quash summonses. The disclosure documents also contain emails between government officials. Another aspect of the civil action pertains to the government compensating racetrack owners and not those who produce the racing animals after the slots deal was scrapped. “Ontario and OLG paid $80.6 million in compensation to those racetrack owners, while refusing to even discuss compensation for the standardbred breeders,” are among the allegations contained in the breeders’ statement of claim. The standardbred breeders were not a party to the slots contracts, which were signed by individual racetrack owners and OLG. However, Justice Emery, in his 2015 decision to order broad document access for the plaintiffs, wrote that “reports by (the Ontario Racing Commission) and other publications reflected the long-term nature of the commitments Ontario and OLG were making to racetracks and stakeholders in the horse racing industry.” The province, in its statement of defence filed by the attorney general’s office, denied “all allegations of liability and wrongdoing referred to in the plaintiff’s claim” and said at all times “the Crown acted in the public interest.” In addition, government decisions “made in relation to the implementation and termination of the Slots at Racetracks Program were core policy and fiscal decisions made in the public interest and made at the Ministerial and Cabinet level of government and are, accordingly, immune from suit,” according to defence pleadings filed by the attorney general’s office. The province also contends: “If the plaintiffs suffered any losses, which the Crown denies, those losses resulted from something other than actions of the Crown.” By Mary Ormsby Reprinted with permission of The Star        

East Rutherford, NJ -- The Meadowlands is announcing that all horses entered in the following stakes; Graduate Finals Trot & Pace, Meadowlands Pace, Mistletoe Shalee, Hambletonian Maturity, WR Haughton Memorial, Golden Girls, Stanley Dancer Memorial and Del Miller Memorial will be required to be stabled at an approved training facility within a 150 mile radius of The Meadowlands by 8:00 pm (EDT) on Monday, July 3 and be made available for Out Of Competition testing as requested.   Trainers for all of the horses entered in those stakes are responsible for informing The Meadowlands Racing Office at (877) 782-5130 to disclose where each horse will be stabled from July 3 until the stakes have been raced.   A requirement of a similiar time frame will be made for horses racing in those stakes surrounding and on Hambletonian Day, August 5.   Further details will be released as they become available.   Nick Salvi

East Maitland thoroughbred training track Fairhall Park could be the future home of Hunter harness racing if Newcastle International Paceway is lost to the sport. The Herald understands Fairhall Park, on Raymond Terrace Rd, East Maitland, is a location harness racing authorities are looking at as a potential new headquarters for the code in the region.  The Herald reported on Friday that Wests Group had guaranteed to contribute at least $10 million towards a potential $20 million rugby league centre of excellence to be built on the Broadmeadow paceway site. The proposal has caused concern among pacing participants, who have enjoyed the top-class track and facilities at Broadmeadow since 1989. The multi-million dollar paceway is built on crown land, which Newcastle Harness Racing Club has a lease on until 2027.  Harness Racing NSW chief John Dumesny said on Monday that his organisation “will be doing everything we can to protect and grow harness racing in the area”. “Harness racing in the Hunter is an integral part of the whole network in NSW,” Dumesny said. He said the industry “wouldn’t be walking away from a property where we have a lengthy lease on” and the preferred area for the Hunter’s premier track was “right at the moment, it’s where it is, at Broadmeadow”. The Herald has reported the state government would build a new track for harness racing in or near Maitland if the Newcastle International Paceway was used for rugby league. The situation opens the door for HRNSW to add the Hunter to its list of industry-owned, redeveloped sites integrating training centres and racing tracks. “Harness racing’s focus in the Hunter is drawn quite easily from our strategies around NSW,” Dumesny said. The City of Maitland Society Of Aeromodellers set-up at Don Macindoe Memorial Flying Field in Fairhall Park. “We have a track and training centre at Menangle, we have a track and soon-to-be training centre at Bathurst. We’ve got land and are about to commence construction of a track and training centre at Wagga, and likewise in Tamworth, where we’ve purchased the showground, where a training centre can be quite easily be added.” Dumesny said there were no desire to move away from training centres at Cessnock and Maitland showgrounds. However, he said a redevelopment project similar to Tamworth at Maitland Showground was not feasible. “Maitland is a privately-owned property and very small, so we would not be building a new track on Maitland Showground,” he said. “The GBOTA have a lease of the track and we’re not in any mind to interfere with the greyhound industry at all. “Tamworth was a bigger property and we were able to buy it outright, it’s not flood affected and a totally different option altogether.” Cessnock City Council is also keen to provide a site for a potential new pacing headquarters. Councillors last week supported a motion to write to the Parliamentary Secretary for the Hunter, Scot Macdonald, and the Newcastle Harness Racing Club to set up a meeting to discuss plans. Dumesny would not comment on other potential sites, saying “we’re not at that place now”. “There’s no need to look at anything until we need to. We are nicely situated at Newcastle,” he said. Fairhall Park is a Maitland City Council-maintained crown land leased by the City of Maitland Society of Aeromodellers (COMSOA). Thoroughbred trainers, like Darryl Roberts, then sub-lease for use of the track. COMSOA secretary Jason Russ said his group had been on the 100-acre site for more than 20 years and had a five-year lease. Russ said the land was flood-prone and their clubhouse had been hit by water “five-feet” high in the past. Craig Kerry   Reprinted with permission of The Newcastle Herald

The U.S. Trotting Association announced Friday (June 16) that it has suspended the membership of Northfield Park due to an alleged violation of USTA Rule 20.09 on financial responsibility. Northfield Park was notified of the suspension on Thursday (June 15). Rule 20.09 Financial Responsibility -- states that, “Any participant who shall demonstrate financial irresponsibility by accumulating unpaid obligations, defaulting in obligations … may be denied membership in the USTA or may be suspended on order of the Executive Vice-President.” This action by the USTA is a result of a dispute over payment for eTrack and related services provided to Northfield Park and, as a consequence of Northfield Park’s suspension, also means that the track’s director, Dave Bianconi, has lost his qualifications to continue his service on the USTA Board of Directors. "It's an unfortunate situation that has been ongoing for some time, but track members must be held to the same level of accountability as individual members,” said USTA Executive Vice President and CEO Mike Tanner. “We hoped to achieve resolution with Northfield, but have been unsuccessful." The ruling for the Northfield Park suspension will appear in the USTA Current Fines & Suspensions Bulletin that will be posted on the USTA website on Friday (June 16). USTA Communications Department 

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today considered a charge issued against licensed trainer Mr Boris Devcic under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 193(1) relating to a stable inspection conducted by HRV Stewards on 4 January 2017.  AHRR 193(1) states:  A person shall not attempt to stomach tube or stomach tube a horse nominated for a race or event within 48 hours of the commencement of the race or event.  The particulars of this charge were that on 4 January 2017 Mr Devcic stomach tubed the horse ‘Flagbearer’ which was engaged to race at the Mildura harness racing meeting that evening.  Mr Devcic pleaded guilty to this charge and after considering submissions regarding penalty the HRV RAD Board imposed a 9 month disqualification, to commence at midnight on 18 June 2017.  In determining penalty the HRV RAD Board considered the following: Mr Devcic’s early guilty plea and co-operation with the Stewards. Mr Devcic’s awareness of the relevant rule Previous penalties for similar offences.  Specific and general deterrence.  That breaches of this rule are serious offences and the need to send a message that such offences are unacceptable. The Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board (RADB) is established under section 50B of the Racing Act (1958). The RADB is an independent Board established to hear and determine appeals in relation to decisions made under the rules to impose penalties on persons and to hear and determine charges made against persons for serious offences.  HRV RAD Board – Boris Devcic 

Verdicts were handed down in the trial of three people, including harness racing trainer Mike O'Brien,  charged with offences in relation to a multi-million dollar gaming machine fraud in the Wellington High Court today. The defendants; Michael Joseph O’Brien (58) of Blenheim, Paul Anthony Max (60) of Nelson, and Kevin Coffey (57) of Hastings, faced Crimes Act charges of ‘Obtaining by deception’. Michael O’Brien has been found guilty of five charges, Paul Max has been found guilty of three charges and the remaining defendant has been found guilty of one charge and not guilty of one other. The manipulation of gambling licenses and grants was detected during Operation Chestnut, a joint investigation involving the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA), the Organised and Financial Crime Agency of New Zealand (OFCANZ), and the Serious Fraud Office (SFO). The investigation was a significant case in New Zealand for the ‘Class 4’ gambling sector, which is made up of high-turnover gambling including gaming machines in pubs and clubs. SFO Director, Julie Read said, “Funding from pokie machines provides millions of dollars of community funding for sport, health, education and other activities every year. Operation Chestnut has been effective in enabling the DIA to pinpoint areas where compliance can be lifted in the sector so that pokie machine benefits can continue without the risk of manipulation or potential criminal activity.” The defendants were remanded in custody by Justice Dobson to next appear for sentencing on 13 July. Andrea Linton Serious Fraud Office 027 705 4550 BACKGROUND TO INVESTIGATION A Pokies 101 guide is available at this link: http://www.dia.govt.nz/Gambling it describes how the Class 4 gambling sector in New Zealand operates. CRIMES ACT OFFENCES Section 240 Obtaining by deception or causing loss by deception (1) Every one is guilty of obtaining by deception or causing loss by deception who, by any deception and without claim of right,- (a) obtains ownership or possession of, or control over, any property, or any privilege, service, pecuniary advantage, benefit, or valuable consideration, directly or indirectly; or (b) in incurring any debt or liability, obtains credit; or (c) induces or causes any other person to deliver over, execute, make, accept, endorse, destroy, or alter any document or thing capable of being used to derive a pecuniary advantage; or (d) causes loss to any other person. (1A) Every person is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years who, without reasonable excuse, sells, transfers, or otherwise makes available any document or thing capable of being used to derive a pecuniary advantage knowing that, by deception and without claim of right, the document or thing was, or was caused to be, delivered, executed, made, accepted, endorsed, or altered. (2) In this section, deception means- (a) a false representation, whether oral, documentary, or by conduct, where the person making the representation intends to deceive any other person and- (i) knows that it is false in a material particular; or (ii) is reckless as to whether it is false in a material particular; or (b) an omission to disclose a material particular, with intent to deceive any person, in circumstances where there is a duty to disclose it; or (c) a fraudulent device, trick, or stratagem used with intent to deceive any person. ABOUT THE SFO The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) was established in 1990 under the Serious Fraud Office Act. The SFO is the lead law enforcement agency for investigating and prosecuting serious or complex financial crime, including bribery and corruption. The presence of an agency dedicated to white collar crime is integral to New Zealand’s reputation for transparency, integrity, fair-mindedness and low levels of corruption. This work contributes to a productive and prosperous New Zealand and the SFO’s collaborative efforts with international partners also reduce the serious harm that corrupt business practices do to the global economy. The SFO has three operational teams; the Evaluation and Intelligence team along with two investigative teams. The SFO operates under two sets of investigative powers. Part 1 of the SFO Act provides that it may act where the Director “has reason to suspect that an investigation into the affairs of any person may disclose serious or complex fraud.”  Part 2 of the SFO Act provides the SFO with more extensive powers where: “…the Director has reasonable grounds to believe that an offence involving serious or complex fraud may have been committed…”  In considering whether a matter involves serious or complex fraud, the Director may, among other things, have regard to: the suspected nature and consequences of the fraud and/or; the suspected scale of the fraud and/or; the legal, factual and evidential complexity of the matter and/or; any relevant public interest considerations. The SFO’s Annual Report 2016 sets out its achievements for the past year, while the Statement of Intent 2014-2018 sets out the SFO’s strategic goals and performance standards. Both are available online at www.sfo.govt.nz The SFO Twitter feed is @FraudSeriousNZ

On 13 June 2017, Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards conducted an inquiry in relation to an incident at the Australasian Premier Trotting Sales held at the Inglis Complex in Oaklands Junction on 2 April 2017. As a part of this investigation, HRV Stewards had obtained evidence from industry participants Roy Spencer, Jamie Quinlan, Michael Taylor and Duncan McPherson.  Upon consideration of all the evidence, Mr Spencer pleaded guilty to a charge of misconduct under Australian Harness Racing Rule 231(2). The particulars of the charge being that at the Australasian Premier Trotting Sales at the Inglis Complex in Oaklands Junction on 2 April 2017, Mr Spencer made inappropriate comments towards Mr Taylor whilst in the presence of the other two aforementioned industry participants. Mr Spencer was fined $500 with a portion of $250 suspended for a period of two years provided Mr Spencer does not reoffend under the same rule within that period. In assessing penalty Stewards took into account the following factors: • Mr Spencer’s guilty plea and previously unblemished record in the industry over approximately 45 years; • Mr Spencer’s forthright evidence and obvious remorse shown for this occurrence; • The need for consistency of penalty in relation to such matters of misconduct. VIC - HRV Stewards Inquiry - Mr Roy Spencer Harness Racing Victoria  

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today considered charges issued against licensed trainer-driver David Moran under Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 216 and 187(2) relating to the nomination of ‘Alla Art’ to race at Ballarat on 19 April 2017.  AHRR 216 states: A person whether alone or in association with others shall not fraudulently or improperly nominate or start a horse in a race.  AHRR 187(2) states: A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation. It was alleged that Mr Moran, as representative for trainer Laura Crossland, improperly nominated the horse ‘Alla Art’ for the Ballarat race on 19 April 2017 for the purpose of ensuring the race went ahead and knowing that ‘Alla Art’ was injured and would not start in that race. Mr Moran was also charged with giving false evidence during the investigation.  Mr Moran pleaded guilty to both charges and the HRV RAD Board heard submissions regarding penalty.  After considering penalty submissions relating to AHRR 216, which included recent comparable penalties, Mr Moran’s offence record and the seriousness of this particular offence, Mr Moran was issued with a fine of $2000.  In relation to the charge under AHRR 187(2), the HRV RAD Board considered that the false evidence was later acknowledged and was followed by an admission of the facts. Mr Moran was fined the sum of $500 on this charge. HRV RAD Board – David Moran Harness Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board 

Harness Racing New South Wales (HRNSW) Stewards conducted an Inquiry today into a report received from the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) that synephrine had been detected in the urine sample taken from VOLATICUS following its win in race 6, the GOLD CROWN COCKTAIL PARTY 24TH MARCH PACE (1730 metres) conducted at Bathurst on Friday 10 March 2017. The ‘B’ sample was confirmed by Racing Analytical Services Limited (RASL) in Victoria. Mr Collins appeared at the inquiry. Evidence including the Reports of Analysis was presented to the Inquiry. Mr Collins presented evidence in relation to his registered training establishment and a report from an Upper Macquarie Country Council Weeds Officer that confirmed the presence of the plant species, Juncus usitatus, at his training establishment. These plants are commonly known as Common Rush, Pin Rush or Mat Rush and produce the substance synephrine. It was noted that a previous warning issued in 2012 is published on HRNSW’s website. HRNSW Stewards also presented a report from The Royal Botanical Gardens, National Herbarium of NSW confirming that plant samples obtained by HRNSW Stewards during a stable inspection at Mr Collins’ training establishment on 10 April 2016 included the species Juncus australis and Juncus laeviusculus.   Mr Collins pleaded guilty to a charge issued pursuant to Rule 190 (1), (2) & (4) for presenting VOLATICUS to race not free of a prohibited substance, being synephrine. In respect of that charge, Stewards did not impose a penalty on Mr Collins as they were satisfied that the detection of synephrine had resulted from inadvertent environmental contamination.  However, Mr Collins was cautioned that he must take all reasonable measures in future to manage his training establishment and horses to ensure that his horses were presented in accord with the Rules. In considering penalty Stewards were mindful of the following; •    Mr Collins’ licence history over a long period, and other personal subjective facts; •    Mr Collins’ had no prior offences of this nature; •    That Mr Collin’s had been proactive in investigating the circumstances; and •    The analytical results in this instance had occurred through inadvertent environmental contamination. Acting under the provisions of Rule 195, VOLATICUS was disqualified from the abovementioned race. Harness Racing NSW (HRNSW) is the controlling body for harness racing in New South Wales with responsibilityfor commercial and regulatory management of the industry including 33 racing clubs across the State. HRNSW is headed by a Board of Directors and is independent of Government.  Harness Racing New South Wales

The Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board today considered charges issued against licensed trainer Michael Doltoff under Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 196B(1) and 187(2) relating to a stable visit conducted by HRV Stewards on 8 December 2016. AHRR 196B(1) states: A person shall not without the permission of the Stewards within one (1) clear day of the commencement of a race administer, attempt to administer or cause to be administered an injection to a horse nominated for that race. The particulars of this charge were that on 8 December 2016, Mr Doltoff did administer an injection to the horse ‘Valtona’ which was engaged to race at Yarra Valley the following day. AHRR 187(2) states:  A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence or information at an inquiry or investigation.  Mr Doltoff was issued with two separate charges under this rule, being that when questioned about the blood on the floor of the wash bay he initially stated that it was not as a result of an injection administered to ‘Valtona’ that day and also that the drip bag hanging in the wash bay was to be used for ‘General Joy’ and not ‘Valtona’. Mr Doltoff pleaded guilty to all three charges and the HRV RAD Board heard submissions regarding penalty.  After considering penalty submissions relating to AHRR 196B(1), that included recent comparable penalties, Mr Doltoff’s offence record and the seriousness of this particular offence, Mr Doltoff was issued with a fine of $4000.  In relation to the two charges under AHRR 187(2) for giving false and misleading evidence, Mr Doltoff was fined the sum of $250 on each charge, with particular consideration given to the relatively short time between the false evidence and the subsequent admission. Harness Racing Appeals & Disciplinary Board  Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards have issued six charges against licensed Trainer-Driver Zac Steenhuis under Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 241 and 187(2) relating to the tender of transfer and claiming documents. Charges 1 to 5 - Rule 241: A person shall not in connection with any part of the harness racing industry do anything which is fraudulent or corrupt. It is alleged that Mr Steenhuis provided HRV with five documents relating to the “Transfer of Ownership of Horse” and “Claiming Forms” of which he entered information and signed under another person’s name. Charge 6 - Rule 187(2) A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence at an inquiry or investigation. It is further alleged that on 4 May 2017, Mr Steenhuis provided false and misleading evidence to HRV Stewards during the course of their investigation. The charges will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards have issued two charges against licensed Trainer-Driver David Moran under Australian Harness Racing Rules (AHRR) 216 and 187(2) in relation to the nomination of ‘Alla Art’ on 13 April 2017. Charge 1 - Rule 216: A person whether alone or in association with others shall not fraudulently or improperly nominate or start a horse in a race. It is alleged that on the On 13 April 2017, Mr Moran nominated the horse ‘Alla Art’ to race at the Ballarat harness racing meeting scheduled for 19 April 2017 when at that time ‘Alla Art’ had suffered an injury and was unfit to compete in a race. Charge 2 - Rule 187(2): A person shall not refuse to answer questions or to produce a horse, document, substance or piece of equipment, or give false or misleading evidence at an inquiry or investigation. The particulars of this charge are that on 20 April 2017, Mr Moran provided false and misleading evidence to HRV Stewards during the course of their investigation. The charges will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Harness Racing Victoria

ON Monday October 31, 2016, Harness Racing New South Wales Stewards commenced an investigation into the apparent administration of a medication to the registered standardbred A MATTER OF COURSE which was engaged to race at the Newcastle meeting that day.  That horse was subsequently scratched from the race by order of Stewards. On that night evidence was taken from Mr G Chapple, the licensed trainer of the horse A MATTER OF COURSE, Mr M Chapple who attended the horse, the Official Starter and the raceday Veterinary Surgeon.  Samples were taken from A MATTER OF COURSE for analysis as well a jar of ointment that was confiscated.  Analysis by the Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory confirmed the prohibited substance menthol was detected in the sample taken from A MATTER OF COURSE.  By letter on April 18, 2017, Stewards notified Mr Chapple of charges laid against him. By email on Friday, April 28, 2017, through his legal representative, Mr Chapple pleaded guilty to the charges and provided detailed submissions in respect to penalty. On Monday, May 23, 2017, HRNSW Stewards convened to consider the submissions entered on the trainer’s behalf and to determine the penalties in the matters. Charge 1 – Pursuant to HRR 192(1) and (3) which state: (1)  No person, unless he has first obtained the permission of the Stewards, shall have in his possession either on a racecourse or in any motor vehicle or trailer being used for the purpose of travelling to or from a racecourse any prohibited substance or a syringe, needle or other instrument which could be used – (3)  A person who fails to comply with sub rule (1) or with a term or condition imposed under sub rule (2) is guilty of an offence. The Stewards announced a fine of $500. Charge 2 – Pursuant to HRR 193 (3), (6) & (8) which state: (3)  A person shall not administer or allow or cause to be administered any medication to a horse on race day prior to such horse running in a race. (6)  For the purposes of this Rule, medication means any treatment with drugs or other substances. (8)  A person who fails to comply with sub-rules (1), (2), (3) or (7) is guilty of an offence. Mr G Chapple admitted instructing his son, driver Mr M Chapple, to apply medication to the horse on race day. The Stewards announced Mr G Chapple be disqualified for a period of six (6) months. Charge 3 – Pursuant to Rules 190 (1), (2) & (4): (1)  A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. (2)  If a horse is presented for a race otherwise than in accordance with sub rule (1) the trainer of the horse is guilty of an offence. (4)  An offence under sub rule (2) or sub rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. The Stewards announced Mr G Chapple be disqualified for a period of six (6) months. In determining these penalties the Stewards noted Mr Chapple’s pleas, his previous disciplinary record, the circumstances of the offence and the subjectives advanced on his behalf, including his cooperation with and before the Stewards. The Stewards ordered that this penalty be served concurrently with the penalty announced in regards to Charge 2. Stewards also ordered that the penalty take effect from midnight Tuesday, May 23, 2017.  Mr G Chapple was advised of his right to appeal the decisions of Stewards. Mr Mitch Chapple – Inquiry Concluded FURTHER to the proceedings at Newcastle on October 31, 2017, Mr M Chapple was notified by letter details dated April 18, 2017, of a charge laid against him. By email on Friday, April 28, 2017, through his legal representative, Mr Chapple pleaded guilty to the charges and provided detailed submissions in regards to penalty. On Monday, May 23, 2017, HRNSW Stewards convened to consider the submission entered on Mr M Chapple’s behalf and to determine a penalty in the matter. Charge 1 – Pursuant to HRR 193 (3), (6) & (8) (3)  A person shall not administer or allow or cause to be administered any medication to a horse on race day prior to such horse running in a race. (6)  For the purposes of this Rule, medication means any treatment with drugs or other substances. (8)  A person who fails to comply with sub-rules (1), (2), (3) or (7) is guilty of an offence. Before Stewards Mr M Chapple had admitted applying medication, being a chest rub ointment, to the horse, A MATTER OF COURSE on the race day and prior to racing.  The Stewards announced a penalty of a fine of $1000 of which $500 was ordered be suspended on the proviso that Mr M Chapple not be found guilty of a breach of any of the rules relating to prohibited substances within a period of 12 months from this date. In determining this penalty the Stewards noted Mr Chapple’s plea, his previous good disciplinary record, the particular circumstances of the offence, as acting under the direction of his parent being the horse’s trainer, and the subjectives advanced on his behalf, including his (young) age and cooperation with and before the Stewards. Mr M Chapple was advised of his right to appeal the decision of the Stewards. MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRAHAM LOCH | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gloch@hrnsw.com.au

Schenectady, NY --- The New York State Gaming Commission today indefinitely suspended harness owner, trainer and driver Michael S. Weiner for racing four horses at Monticello Raceway doped with mitragynine, a dangerous drug with performance enhancing and analgesic effects similar to cocaine and morphine. Commonly known as Kratom and derived from the plant Mitragyna speciosa that grows only in Southeast Asia, there is no legitimate reason for mitragynine to be found in any race horse. Kratom is a controlled substance in many countries and has been declared a “drug of concern” by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency with no known legitimate industrial, agrochemical, chemical, human or veterinary medical use. The drug was found in Weiner’s horses through the introduction of an analytical detection methodology by the New York Drug Testing and Research Program (NYDTRP). To date, it has not been identified in any other racing jurisdiction. After the NYDTRP identified the presence of Kratom, the lab conducted a drug administration trial to substantiate that administration had occurred within one week of the horses’ races in clear violation of Commission rules. “This dangerous drug has no business anywhere in horse racing,” said Ronald Ochrym, the Commission’s Director of Horse Racing and Pari-Mutuel Wagering. “Thanks to the innovative work of the New York Drug Testing and Research Program, this individual is no longer participating in the sport and we are on the lookout for additional cheaters.” Weiner trained four horses that raced at Monticello Raceway on February 2, 3 and 7, 2017. Bupa Bruiser finished first in the third race at Monticello on February 2, 2017 French Lick finished fifth in the third race at Monticello on February 3, 2017 Vernon Belle finished second in the seventh race at Monticello on February 3, 2017 Majestic Jo finished first in the fifth race at Monticello on February 7, 2017 All four horses have been disqualified and Weiner’s share of purses in the above mentioned races have been ordered returned. Effective today, Weiner is summarily suspended and is excluded from all New York tracks. Upon full adjudication by the Commission, Weiner could ultimately have his license to participate revoked and face up to $25,000 in fines per violation. A hearing on the matter is currently scheduled for June 2. What is Mitragynine? Click here. More here Chemists study the neurochemistry of alkaloids from the Mitragyna plant In study after study, Mitragynine is called out as the most prevalent and potent alkaloid in the kratom leaf’s arsenal. Unintentional Fatal Intoxications with Mitragynine by Lee Park, director of communications, New York State Gaming Commission 

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