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Chief harness racing steward Barbara Scott will give written notice of possible action against trainers and reinsmen who have made derogatory comments about her on social media. Stewards said yesterday they had fined stablehand Jason Huston $1000 after inquiring into improper social media comments he made in February. “There will be more in this situation,” Scott said. “I’ll be sending letters to licensed people who have breached rules through social media comments. Trainers and reinsmen will be among those who receive letters.” Racing and Wagering WA chief executive Richard Burt defended Scott from a social media campaign early this year. In a media statement on March 1, Burt said there had been inaccurate commentary on social media. “Ms Scott is not leaving her position as chief steward of harness racing,” he said. “Despite some recent inaccurate commentary on social media, she is not the subject of any investigation or inquiry. “RWWA is delighted with Ms Scott’s performance and dedication. She has our full support and confidence. Action will be taken by RWWA when licensed persons’ conduct detrimentally affects the welfare and integrity of racing.” Scott was appointed chief steward at Gloucester Park early last year. Huston, who pleaded guilty to having made improper comments about Scott on February 24, had $500 of his fine suspended on the provision he did not breach RWWA’s social media rules in the next 12 months. Reinsman Gary Hall has been fined $800 after pleading guilty to using an unacceptable whip action when driving Liberty Rose in the Group 1 WA Oaks (2536m) a fortnight ago. By Ernie Manning Reprinted with permission of The West Australian

Harness racing trainer Gavin Smith has been fined $750.00 for striking his own horse. Nothing wrong with that you say! Except the horse he hit with his whip was racing next to him and being driven by another driver. At the North Canterbury trials on the 9th May Gavin Smith was driving Bronx Village (a horse he trains) who was leading as the field turned for home with Reverse Phsychology, Smith’s other runner in the race who was being driven by Siv Diamant, in the trail. Reverse Phsychology improved to Smith’s outside and shortly afterwards he drew his whip and struck that horse on one occasion. Smith admitted he had acted in moment of stupidity and said that he had told Siv that she would have to be tough on the horse, as he was a bludger. He said that he could see he was going well when he raced up beside him but straight away “knocked off”. Siv was only giving the horse little flicks, he said, and he had yelled to her to “get up him”. Smith said Siv continued on with the little flicks and without thinking he reached around and struck the horse. He did not even think about it being a trials day and that it was a spur of the moment, a stupid thing to do. The JCA submitted that a $500 fine and a 3-day suspension be considered as penalty, but after taking all factors into account determined that a $750.00 fine was a more appropriate penalty in this case.   Full details below:   BEFORE A JUDICIAL COMMITTEE IN THE MATTER of the New Zealand Rules of Harness Racing IN THE MATTER of Information No. A10183 BETWEEN SHANE RENAULT Stipendiary Steward for the Racing Integrity Unit Informant AND GAVIN SMITH of Kaiapoi, Licensed Open Horseman Respondent Date of Hearing: 13 May 2018 Venue: Phar Lap Racecourse, Timaru Judicial Committee: S Ching (Chair) D Anderson (Committee Member) Present: S Renault, the Informant G Smith, the Respondent Date of Decision: 13 May 2018 PENALTY DECISION OF JUDICIAL COMMITTEE The Charge [1] Information No.A10183 alleges that: G Smith as the driver of BRONX VILLAGE used his whip to strike another runner namely REVERSE PSYCHLOGY, near the 200 metres. The Rules [2] Rule 869(2) reads as follows; 869 (2) No horseman shall during any race use a whip in a manner in contravention of the Use of the Whip Regulations made by the Board. Use of the Whip Regulation (g) reads as follows; (g) No horseman shall use their whip in such a way that it baulks, inconveniences, impedes or strikes another horse or horseman. The Plea [3] Mr Smith had signed the Information that the breach was admitted. Mr Smith confirmed this at the hearing. He also confirmed he understood the rule he was being charged with. Summary of Facts [4] On 9 May 2018 at the North Canterbury TOA trials meeting at Rangiora Racecourse, Open Horseman, Mr G Smith was the trainer and driver of BRONX VILLAGE in Race 12, a Non-winners Pace trial and was placed 3rd in the event. Mr Smith was also the trainer of REVERSE PSYCHOLOGY, who was driven by Ms S Diamant, and was placed 2nd in the same event. [5] During the running and near the 200m, Mr Smith was observed to strike another runner, being REVERSE PSYCHOLOGY. [6] This incident was observed by the officiating Stipendiary Steward, Mr S Renault and recorded by the oncourse cameras. [7] Mr Renault made application pursuant to Rule 1103(4)(c) from the General Manager of the RIU, Mr M Godber, to lodge an information against Mr Smith for a breach of Rule 869(2)(g). This application was granted on 11 May 2018 and a letter was produced for the Judicial Committee. [8] Mr Smith was subsequently charged with a breach of Rule 869(2) in that he used his whip to strike another runner near the 200m. Informant’s Submissions [9] Mr Renault showed side on video footage of the incident to the Committee which showed Mr Smith driving BRONX VILLAGE leading as the field turned for home with REVERSE PSYCHOLOGY, Mr Smith’s other runner in the race and driven by Ms S Diamant, in the trail. He said that REVERSE PSYCHOLOGY improved to Mr Smith’s outside and shortly afterwards Mr Smith drew his whip and struck REVERSE PSYCHOLOGY on one occasion. [10] Mr Renault stated that this was a deliberate action by Mr Smith who looked to his outside, saw his other horse there, drew the whip and struck the horse. Mr Smith, on the day, stated to Mr Renault, that he didn’t think his driver was hitting the horse or urging it on enough over the concluding stages. Mr Renault submitted that this was a safety issue as Mr Smith could not know what reaction the horse would take after being struck on the inside. He also stated that the Stewards take a dim view of Mr Smith’s actions and believe they are totally unacceptable. Mr Renault in answer to a question from the Committee, stated that Ms Diamant had informed him that the whip had struck the horse on the backside. Mr Renault said that even though it was only one strike, the perception to the betting public, was poor. Submissions of Respondent [11] Mr Smith stated that it was a “moment of stupidity”. He said that he owned REVERSE PYSCHOLOGY, that he was a “bludger” and hadn’t been anywhere in the past year. Mr Smith said that as he owns REVERSE PYSCHOLOGY and as he had a paying clients horse in the race, he had decided to drive BRONX VILLAGE. [12] Mr Smith said that he had told Ms Diamant that she would have to be tough on the horse, as he was a bludger. He said that he could see he was going well when he raced up beside him but straight away “knocked off”. Ms Diamant was only giving the horse little flicks, he said, and he had yelled to her to “get up him”. Mr Smith said Ms Diamant continued on with the little flicks and without thinking he reached around and struck the horse. He did not even think about it being a trials day and that it was a spur of the moment, a stupid thing to do. He also said that as soon as he had done it, could not believe how stupid he had been. He also said it was a bad look, a dumb thing to do, and still doesn’t know why he let it happen. Submissions of Informant on Penalty [13] Mr Renault for the RIU stated that Mr Smith had a clear record in relation to this part of the rule. He said that a breach of this particular rule where another horse is struck, was very uncommon and as such here were no precedents to assist with penalty. Mr Renault stated that the JCA Penalty Guide does not provide a starting point and only refers to penalty being “case by case on merits”. [14] Mr Renault submitted that an appropriate penalty in this case is a combined suspension and fine. He stated that this was a deliberate act which should not be accepted, and an appropriate penalty should be one that will send a clear message to all industry participants that this sort of behaviour will not be tolerated. Mr Renault submitted that a fine of $500 as well as a 3-day suspension be considered as penalty. Respondent’s Submissions [15] Mr Smith stated that a suspension as well as a fine was incredibly harsh for one strike at a trials meeting. He said that he was already suspended, for careless driving, from after the Addington meeting on Friday 18 May up to and including 27 May 2018. He said a suspension would be excessive especially as the first day of suspension would be the Harness Jewels day on 2 June. Reasons for Penalty [16] In determining penalty, we carefully considered all factors in regard to this breach. In mitigation, Mr Smith’s frank admission of the breach, his genuine remorse and his clear record in relation to this part of the rule, are factors to be taken into account. [17] Mr Smith admitted to an act of stupidity and also conceded that it was not a good look for the industry. We agree with both points and determined that these were aggravating factors. We also agreed with Mr Renault who stated that there is a need to send a clear message to all industry participants that this sort of behaviour will not be tolerated. [18] Mr Renault submitted that a $500 fine and a 3-day suspension be considered as penalty in this case. The JCA Penalty Guide does not provide a starting point for a breach of this rule but states that any penalty be on a “case by case on merits”. Charges under this section of the Whip Regulations with similar circumstances are so uncommon there are no historical precedents of penalty to assist us. After careful consideration this Committee determined that a combined penalty of a fine of $500 and a 3-day suspension would be disproportionate to the level of offending, especially in Mr Smith’s case where the first day of any suspension imposed would be the country’s premier meeting of the year, being the Harness Jewels meeting at Cambridge. [19] Taking all factors into account we determined that a fine was an appropriate penalty in this case. The level of this fine we set at $750. [20] Mr Smith is fined the sum of $750. S Ching CHAIR http://www.jca.org.nz/non-race-day-hearings/non-raceday-inquiry-riu-v-g-smith-decision-dated-13-may-2018-chair-mr-s-ching   Harnesslink Media

Harness racing trainer Don Burrows has been fined $9,000 for producing a horse to race when not free of a prohibited substance (Kavain). The horse in question was Lightworkofit who won at Addington on the 2nd and 23rd of February 2018 but has since been disqualified from both races. Burrows accepted that he has committed a breach of the Prohibited Substance Rule and that it was a serious matter. He was shocked when informed that Lightworkofit had tested positive to Kavain (Kava). He had not heard of it and it was not a substance he would feed to his horses. Kavain is the main kavalactone found mostly in the roots of the kava plant. The roots of the plant are used to produce a drink with sedative, anesthetic, euphoriant, and entheogenic properties. The Committee was satisfied that a fine of $9,000 is an appropriate penalty in this case. They believed that such a penalty will satisfy the principal requirements of sentencing – that is to say, to punish the offender, to deter the offender and others in the industry and the need to maintain integrity and public confidence in harness racing. Full details below: BEFORE A JUDICIAL COMMITTEE OF THE JUDICIAL CONTROL AUTHORITY HELD AT CHRISTCHURCH IN THE MATTER of the New Zealand Rules of  Harness Racing IN THE MATTER of Informations Nos. A7222 & A7223 BETWEEN K R WILLIAMS, Racing Investigator for the Racing Integrity Unit Informant AND DONALD GORDON BURROWS of Balcairn, Public Trainer Respondent Judicial Committee: R G McKenzie (Chair) D M Jackson (Committee Member) Venue: Addington Raceway, Christchurch Present: Mrs K R Williams, the Informant Mr D G Burrows, the Respondent Mrs P M A Burrows, Lay Advocate for the Respondent Mr S P Renault, Stipendiary Steward (Registrar) Date of Hearing: 4 May 2018 Date of Decision: 15 May 2018 RESERVED PENALTY DECISION OF JUDICIAL COMMITTEE The Charges [1] Information No. A7222 alleges that “on the 2nd day of February 2018, the Respondent being the registered trainer of the Standardbred LIGHTWORKOFIT, presented the horse to race in Race 8, the Macca Lodge- Tuapeka Lodge-Denario Breeding Mobile Trot, at the New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club’s meeting with a prohibited substance, namely Kavain (Kava) in its system in breach of the Prohibited Substance Rule, Rule 1004 (1A), (3) and (4)”. [2] Information No. A7223 alleges that “on the 23rd day of February 2018, the Respondent being the registered trainer of the Standardbred LIGHTWORKOFIT, presented the horse to race in Race 10, the IRT Mobile Trot, at the New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club’s meeting with a prohibited substance, namely Kavain (Kava) in its system in breach of the Prohibited Substance Rule, Rule 1004 (1A), (3) and (4)”. The Rules [3] Rule 1004 of the Rules of Harness Racing provides as follows: (1A) A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances (3) When a horse is presented to race in contravention of sub-rule (1A) or (2) the trainer of the horse commits a breach of these Rules. (4) A breach of sub-rule (1A), (2) or (3A) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the . . . prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. [4] The penalty Rule is Rule 1004 (7) which provides as follows: (1) Every person who commits a breach of sub-rule (2) or (3) shall be liable to: (a) a fine not exceeding $20,000.00; and/or (b) be disqualified or suspended from holding or obtaining a licence, for any specific period not exceeding five years. [5] Mrs Williams presented a letter dated 13 April 2018 signed by Mr M R Godber, General Manager of the Racing Integrity Unit, pursuant to Rule 1108 (2) authorising the filing of the information. The Plea [6] Mr Burrows had signed the Statement by the Respondent on each of the information forms indicating that he admitted the breaches. He was present at the hearing of the information. The charges and relevant Rules were read to him, after which he confirmed that he admitted the breaches. [7] The charges were found proved. Summary of Facts [8] Mrs Williams presented the following written submissions to the hearing: 1. LIGHTWORKOFIT is a 12-year-old bay gelding and is trained by Mr Donald Gordon BURROWS. LIGHTWORKOFIT is owned by Mrs P M Burrows, D G Burrows, S C Bavin and M N Bavin. LIGHTWORKOFIT has raced 45 times for 5 wins and lifetime stakes of $34,721 as at 23 April 2018. 2. LIGHTWORKOFIT was correctly entered and presented to race by trainer Mr Donald Burrows at the NZMTC meeting on 2 February 2018. LIGHTWORKOFIT was driven in Race 8, the MACCA LODGE-TUAPEKA LODGE-DENARIO BREEDING MOBILE TROT, by Mr D J Dunn, winning the race and a stake of $5,300. This stake has not been paid out. 3. Following the race, the Stipendiary Stewards ordered that LIGHTWORKOFIT be post-race swabbed. LIGHTWORKOFIT entered the swab box at 9.20pm and Swabbing Steward, Mr M P McCann, obtained a urine sample from the gelding at 9.25pm. The race was programmed to start at 8.56pm. The urine sample was taken in the presence of the Mr Burrows. The urine samples were recorded with the Sample number 139961. Mr Burrows does not contest the taking of the sample. 4. LIGHTWORKOFIT was correctly entered and presented to race by trainer Mr Donald Burrows at the NZMTC meeting on 23 February 2018. LIGHTWORKOFIT was driven in Race 10, the IRT MOBILE TROT, by Mr G D Smith, winning the race and a stake of $5,300. This stake has not been paid out. 5. Following the race, the Stipendiary Stewards ordered that LIGHTWORKOFIT be post-race swabbed. LIGHTWORKOFIT entered the swab box at 9.46pm and Swabbing Steward Mr G Johnston obtained a urine sample from the gelding at 9.50pm. The race was programmed to start at 9.30pm. The urine sample was taken in the presence of Mr Burrows. The urine samples were recorded with the Sample number 81616. Mr Burrows does not contest the taking of the sample. 6. On the 21st March 2018 the New Zealand Racing Laboratory reported Karvain (Kava) was detected in Sample Numbers 139961 and 81636. The Control Samples were clear. 7. On the 22nd March 2018, RIU members Mrs Kylie Williams and Mr Nick Ydgren went to the training establishment of Mr Burrows, 91 Smiths Road, Amberley, and advised him of the positive swabs returned by LIGHTWORKOFIT. 8. Mr Burrows was given copies of the Certificates of Analysis, the Swab Cards, RIU Swabbing Record Book and Race Results. 9. Mr Burrows could not offer an explanation for the presence of Kavain (Kava) in the urine samples taken from LIGHTWORKOFIT at the two race meetings. 10. Mr Burrows confirmed that he was not aware that Kava is a prohibited substance under the rules and does not check with a Veterinarian when using new supplements/products. 11. There are at least two products that are readily available in New Zealand that contain Kava. Mr Burrows had heard of one of the products as his daughter had used it on one of her horses in the past. Both products on their website advise that they contain Kava and that Kava is swabbable under FEI (Federation Equestrian International) rules. Mr Burrows advised that he has not used either product on his horse and none were found on his property. 12. Mr Burrows confirmed that LIGHTWORKOFIT was stood down from racing after breaking at the start in each of the four raceday starts from 17 December 2017 to 7 January 2018. After this Mr Burrows went to a local Rural Supply Company seeking a product to calm his horse. Mr Burrows purchased a product and this was one of the samples tested by the Laboratory and did not contain Kava. 13. The horse then finished 4th, 1st, 10th and 1st in its next four starts. The two wins are the subject of these positive swabs. 14. Mr Burrows does not keep a diary of treatments and keeps the horse feeds and additives in a locked shed. 15. Samples of several products were taken and forwarded to the NZ Racing Laboratory for testing with the Laboratory advising on 10 April 2018 that none of the products contained Kava. 16. Mr Burrows has been training since 1978/79. Mr Burrows has trained 38 winners. 17. Mr Burrows has not previously been charged with a breach of the prohibited substance rule. [9] Mrs Burrows confirmed to the Committee that the Summary of Facts was accepted by Mr Burrows. Informant’s Penalty Submissions [10] Mrs Williams presented the following written penalty submissions: 1. Mr Burrows has pleaded guilty to two breaches of Rule 1004(1A), (3) & (4) after presenting LIGHTWORKOFIT at the races with a prohibited substance in its system, namely Kavain (Kava), at the New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club meetings on the 2nd February and 23rd February 2018. 2. The penalty provisions that apply in this case are outlined in Rule 1104(7). 1004(7) Every person who commits a breach of sub-rule (2) or (3) shall be liable to: (a) a fine not exceeding $20,000; and/or (b) be disqualified or suspended from holding or obtaining a licence for any specific period not exceeding five years. 3. The rules also require the mandatory disqualification of the horse: Rule 1004(8) states: 1004(8) Any horse connected with a breach of sub-rule (1), (2), or (3) shall be disqualified from any race entered and/or liable to a period of disqualification not exceeding five years. 1004D Any horse which has been taken to a racecourse for the purpose of engaging in a race which is found to have administered to it or ingested by it any prohibited substance shall be disqualified from that race. 4. Sentencing Principles - The four principles of sentencing can be summarised briefly ● Penalties are designed to punish the offender for his / her wrongdoing. They are not retributive in the sense that the punishment is disproportionate to the offence but the offender must be met with a punishment. ● In a racing context it is extremely important that a penalty has the effect of deterring others from committing like offences. ● A penalty should also reflect the disapproval of the J.C.A for the type of behaviour in question. ● The need to rehabilitate the offender should be taken into account. The first three principles are particularly important here. Relevant Precedents – In addition to the sentencing principles the Judicial Committee should have regard to relevant precedents. There are no previous positive swabs for Kava however the following have points of relevance as to the need to impose a penalty. R.I.U. v J M Whittaker – 17 August 2015 Subject: Caffeine positive with a horse – fined $1,000, costs $1,800. Extract from Whittaker decision: “RIU v L J Justice (2011) where that Committee stated ….. penalties will be imposed for breaches of the rule which will recognise, reinforce and give effect to the pivotal significance of the rule in maintaining the integrity of racing, whether or not culpable conduct is involved. Naturally where culpable conduct is involved, penalties imposed will normally be greater than in cases where such conduct is absent but we think it is wrong and contrary to the intent and purpose of the rule to assume the absence of culpable conduct should attract no, or only a token penalty.” R.I.U. v P M Williamson – 10 December 2012 Subject: Procaine positive with a horse – fined $3,500, costs $350 to JCA. The source of the positive swab was not identified. “Against those factors is the ever-present need to maintain the integrity of and public confidence in harness racing by adequately punishing the breach and deterring Mr Williamson and others from offending in a similar manner in the future.” 5. Aggravating Features – Mr Burrows cannot advise how the Kava came to be in the horse’s system on the two racedays but specifically sought out a product to give a calming effect on the horse without seeking Veterinary advice. The horse then went on to win twice and be placed fourth in its next four starts. The two wins are subject to these positive swabs. Kava is inherently used to produce a drink with sedative, anaesthetic, euphoriant and entheogenic properties. Kava is used for its sedating effects. We are dealing with two positives swabs. The first positive swab was not declared when the second positive swab occurred. 6. Mitigating Factors – Mr Burrows admits full liability as the trainer and admitted the breach at the first opportunity and has cooperated fully throughout the investigation. Mr Burrows has a clear record not having breached this rule. Mr Burrows has been training for over 40 years and has trained 38 winners. Conclusion – The Racing Integrity Unit seeks a monetary penalty of a fine of $10,000. The reason for this figure is that the JCA guidelines, 1st May 2015, have a starting point of $8,000 for a first offence of presenting a horse with a drug in its system. In setting penalty for two breaches this committee can take reference from RIU v A L J Lynch, 16 October 2015. Extract: “In RIU v B Towers (15 May 2015), which related to 2 charges where the Defendant Towers failed to present his horse free of the prohibited substance namely Clenbuterol, the Committee in its written decision considered options for determining penalty for multiple charges. The Committee in Towers referred to RIU v McInerney noting that it was submitted to support the submission that when setting a quantum, the Committee could look to set the financial penalty for the second breach at a level which was half that of the original breach. An approach in line with that adopted in McInerney supports the view that to impose a quantum for each breach, albeit resulting from the same on-going action. As with the Beck decision the circumstances of Towers are slightly different to the present case, albeit the discussion on rationale for decision making offers something for this Committee to consider in determining penalty quantum for all 3 charges.” Mr Burrows has to be given credit for the manner in which he has conducted himself during this inquiry and admitting the breach at the first opportunity. However, the onus is on trainers at all times to ensure that a horse in their care and control is completely drug free when presented at the races. We also seek the disqualification of LIGHTWORKOFIT under Rule 1004(8). 7. The R.I.U. are not seeking to recover any costs in this matter. Respondent’s Submissions [11] Mrs Burrows presented a lengthy written Submission on behalf of the Respondent which is now summarised: 1. Mr Burrows was granted a professional horseman’s licence in 1976. He holds a Public Trainer and a Graduation Driver licences. He has trained a small team of horses for the past 42 years. He is a fully-qualified Farrier, specialising in corrective shoeing. 2. He turned 65 in 2016 and is now semi-retired. He and his wife own a small farm of 15 acres in North Canterbury where he trains horses that they have bred. He is well-respected in harness racing circles and is described by those who know him well as a quiet, reliable professional person who always acts with integrity. He has never come to the attention of the Racing Integrity Unit nor has he ever had a positive swab before. 3. Mr Burrows accepts that he has committed a breach of the Prohibited Substance Rule and that it is a serious matter. He was shocked when informed that LIGHTWORKOFIT had tested positive to Kavain. He had not heard of it. It is not a substance he would feed to his horses. 4. None of the samples of feed and supplements collected from the property registered the presence of Kavain and Mr Burrows has no knowledge of how LIGHTWORKOFIT tested positive to that substance and he certainly did not administer any banned substance. 5. He does not cover his training costs with the small number of horses that he trains. He trains, not for financial gain but for the love of the sport. Neither does he bet on his or any other horses. 6. It was impossible for any notification of the first positive to occur prior to LIGHTWORKOFIT racing again on 23 February, on which date the horse won again, otherwise the horse would not have raced. 7. Mr Burrows pleaded guilty at the first opportunity, was cooperative and assisted willingly in the investigation. He is deeply regretful and he and his wife have suffered much stress. He has no money to pay a fine and a fine will effectively end his 42-year career. 8. Mrs Burrows presented a “Personal Statement” which we do not reproduce here but which we have taken into account in arriving at penalty. 9. Character references were available from a number of named “Harness Racing Stakeholders”. [12] Mrs Burrows then made further oral submissions to the hearing. [13] It would be “catastrophic”, she said for Mr Burrows to have to pay a fine of the amount submitted by Mrs Williams ($10,000). She urged the Committee to take into account the mitigating circumstances that had been put forward. Herself and Mr Burrows had no income at present and the training operation had not made a profit in a decade because of the “depressed” state of the industry. It was accepted that Mr Burrows would have to pay a fine. [14] LIGHTWORKOFIT was a relatively old horse when he began racing and has been a hard horse to manage. He has always been drug-free. Mr Burrows has not had a positive swab in over 40 years in the industry. The Committee needs to signal to the industry that there can be “clemency”. [15] A public apology has been made on social media because she and Mr Burrows were so upset at what had happened. [16] Mrs Burrows stressed that there would not have been a “second penalty” because the horse would not have been racing had they been aware of the first positive. The horse has since won again at Addington on 26 April. [17] Mrs Burrows submitted that a fine of between $3,000 and $5,000 would be an appropriate penalty in the circumstances. Reasons for Penalty [18] The relevant penalty Rule for a breach of the Prohibited Substance Rule is Rule 1004 (7) which provides: Every person who commits a breach of sub-rule (2) or (3) shall be liable to: (a) a fine not exceeding $20,000.00; and/or (b) be disqualified or suspended from holding or obtaining a licence for any specific period not exceeding five years. [19] The starting point for penalty for a breach of the Prohibited Substance Rule is provided in the Penalty Guide for Judicial Committees (effective 1 May 2015). For a first presentation offence, the Penalty Guide starting point is a fine of $8,000. The Penalty Guide provides that “the starting point is just that: movement both above and below may (and usually will) occur”. The Committee believes that the starting point of $8,000 for the first breach is the appropriate starting point in this case. [20] The Committee must, of course, have regard to the fact that Mr Burrows has been charged with two breaches of the Prohibited Substance Rule. Of course, the starting point in the Penalty Guide relates to a single breach. The Judicial Committee in the case of RIU v C D & A D Edmonds (2016), a case which involved one horse and two charges arising from positive swabs two weeks apart, adopted the view that a totality approach was appropriate and took a starting point of $12,000 on the basis of $8,000 for the first breach and $4,000 for the second breach. A similar approach has been taken in other cases involving multiple breaches and, in adopting that totality approach, the Committee is satisfied that $12,000 should be the starting point in this case. [21] The Committee, having established that starting point, is required to take into account aggravating and mitigating factors in the particular case. [22] In the present case, as is the case in many or most other cases of presentation, the source of the prohibited substance, in this case Kavain (Kava), cannot be determined. Mr Burrows denied treating LIGHTWORKOFIT with any product containing that substance and no such product was found on his property. Neither the Informant nor Mr Burrows has been able to point to a likely source of the prohibited substance. The Committee has to deal with penalty on that basis. [23] We cannot find any particular aggravating factors in this case. Mrs Williams in her penalty submissions highlighted an aggravating factor in that Mr Burrows had “specifically sought out a product to give a calming effect on the horse without seeking veterinary advice”. This statement was not challenged by Mrs Burrows, which we take as an acknowledgement that Mr Burrows had treated the horse with a product intended to calm it. However, with no product containing Kavain having been found on the property and in the absence of any other proof, we are reluctant to draw the conclusion that such treatment was the source of the Kavain in the horse’s system. [24] Mitigating factors to which we have had regard are Mr Burrows’ frank admission of the breach, his cooperation with the Racing Integrity Unit during the inquiry and his previous unblemished record over 40-plus years in the harness racing industry. These are significant. [25] We have noted Mrs Burrows’ submissions on behalf of her husband concerning their present financial position and the effect that a fine would have on them. The ability of a Respondent to pay a fine is one factor to which a Judicial Committee would normally have regard in fixing a fine in a particular case. [26] The Committee notes that Mr Burrows accepts that a fine will be payable. However, he is concerned about the quantum of that fine and his ability to meet it. While impecuniosity may be a mitigating factor personal to a respondent, the Committee does not believe that to be the case here. Mr & Mrs Burrows admitted to ownership of a 15-acre farm in North Canterbury and, further, stated that they would accept a fine of $5,000. Those factors suggest that they are not impecunious to the extent that a fine would have a crushing effect on them. For those reasons, and because we have had no detailed financial statement presented in support of those submissions, we choose not to give any weight to financial position in this case [27] From the starting point reached as above [paragraph 19], it is appropriate that Mr Burrows should receive a discount for the mitigating factors referred to in paragraph [23]. Mrs Burrows told us that character references were available. However, she saw fit not to actually produce any to the Committee so, unfortunately, in their absence, we can give no weight to these. [28] After consideration, the Committee fixes the appropriate discount at 25 per cent. [29] In arriving at a penalty of a fine of $9,000, the Committee received considerable guidance from the Edmonds case referred to in paragraph [24] above. A fine of $9,000 is consistent with the fine in that case, in which the facts were very similar. [30] The Committee is satisfied that a fine of $9,000 will suffice to satisfy the general purposes of sentencing which are well-established – to hold the offender accountable for his actions, to promote in the offender a sense of responsibility, to denounce the conduct of the offender and to deter the offender or other persons from committing the same or a similar offence. The Committee has also had regard, as always, to the important consideration of the need to maintain integrity and public confidence in Harness Racing. Disqualification of Horse [31] It is ordered that, effective from 7 May 2018, LIGHTWORKOFIT is disqualified from Race 8, Macca Lodge-Tuapeka Lodge-Denario Breeding Mobile Trot held at the meeting of New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club at Addington Raceway on 2 February 2018. Consequent upon the disqualification, the amended result for the race is as follows: 1st Speedy Command 2nd The Bloss 3rd Tijuana Taxi 4th Star Pride 5th Castleton Tui [35] It is further ordered that, effective from 7 May 2018, LIGHTWORKOFIT is disqualified from Race 10, IRT Mobile Trot held at the meeting of New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club at Addington Raceway on 23 February 2018. Consequent upon the disqualification, the amended result for the race is as follows: 1st Mystical Star 2nd Westar Maggie 3rd Rachmaninov 4th Tijuana Taxi 5th Chivasion [33] In the case of each of the above races, the Committee orders that stakes be paid in accordance with the amended result. Costs [34] Mrs Williams did not seek any costs in favour of the Racing Integrity Unit and, accordingly, no order is made. [35] The hearing took place on a raceday and, in the circumstances, no order for costs is made in favour of the Judicial Control Authority. R G McKenzie CHAIR http://www.jca.org.nz/non-race-day-hearings/non-raceday-inquiry-riu-v-d-g-burrows-reserved-penalty-decision-dated-15-may-2018-chair-mr-r-g-mckenzie     Harnesslink Media

RACE 5 – ALBANY HARNESS RACING MEETING 16 FEBRUARY 2018 Stewards recently finalised a number of inquiries that had been adjourned from Race 5 at Albany on 16 February 2018. Background Race 5 at Albany on 16 February 2018 was a standing start race.  After the start, MELTON EXPRESS (W. Andrews) was fractious and as a result made contact with CRIMSON FLOYD (T. Stone) which had begun from 30 metres.   This resulted in W. Andrews being dislodged from the sulky but remaining on his feet and T. Stone being dislodged and returning to his feet immediately.  Both drivers continued to retain hold of the reins with no horses falling to the track and therefore both horses and drivers were cleared from the track quickly with the track being cleared to continue racing after approximately 20 seconds. The remaining horses and drivers continued in the race however in the back straight on the first occasion, J. Justins (CHUCK NORRIS), M. Young (ESTOCADA) , L. Inwood (ACROSS THE WAY) and T. Wheeler (FOUR NEEDED) all began to restrain their horses to varying degrees, with CHUCK NORRIS and ACROSS THE WAY being pulled up to a walk, ESTOCADA being restrained and losing ground and FOUR NEEDED being impeded and losing ground when caught behind ACROSS THE WAY which was under restraint.  DREDLOCK ROCKSTAR (A. Markham) continued on in the race and improved around the horses that were being restrained and worked to the lead.  DREDLOCK ROCKSTAR won the race. After being caught behind ACROSS THE WAY, T. Wheeler was able to gain clear running with FOUR NEEDED and although initially cautious, then obtained a trail on DREDLOCK ROCKSTAR and continued on and completed the race, being placed second, beaten 8 metres. After restraining ESTOCADA and losing ground, M. Young continued on and completed the race, being placed third, beaten 42 metres. After restraining ACROSS THE WAY to a walk, L. Inwood continued on and completed the race, being placed fourth, beaten 380 metres. After restraining  CHUCK NORRIS to a walk, J. Justins continued on and completed the race, being placed fifth, beaten 732 metres. The all clear was delayed to allow Stewards to review the race and interview all drivers.  In determining it was a race, Stewards took into account that no horse suffered interference in the race, all horses were afforded a fair start, there was no obstruction on the track and it was solely the action and decisions of drivers that affected the outcome of the race. Inquiries into the tactics adopted by drivers was adjourned. Inquiries Finalised At the resumption of the inquiry, further evidence was taken from L. Inwood, T. Wheeler, M. Young and J. Justins.  Assistance was provided to M. Young and J. Justins throughout the inquiry from RWWA Driving Master Mr Trevor Warwick. Stewards issued a charge under Rule 149(2) to L. Inwood, M. Young and J. Justins 149(2) A driver shall not drive in a manner which in the opinion of the stewards is unacceptable. The particulars being that in the opinion of stewards it was unacceptable for drivers to restrain their horses and lose ground when the track was clear for racing and no sirens had been sounded.  In determining penalty stewards took into account: It is a drivers primary obligation to give their horse every opportunity to win or obtain the best possible placing The action of drivers resulted in their horses losing ground which affects their finishing position The action of drivers resulted in punters, owners and trainers being financially disadvantaged It is not acceptable for drivers to take matters into their own hands Drivers that intentionally restrain their horse in a race, some to a degree that the horse came to a walk is an integrity issue and will lead Stewards to question the motives of drivers This type of action by drivers is detrimental to the harness racing industry in that  horses that are not allowed to run on their merits will result in a loss of confidence from punters. That any penalty must be a general deterrent The guilty pleas of the drivers Their offence history and previous penalties under this Rule. The following penalties were issued: L. Inwood  (ACROSS THE WAY) – Suspension of licence for 6 weeks J. Justins  (CHUCK NORRIS) – Suspension of licence for 4 weeks M. Young  (ESTOCADA) – Suspension of licence for 4 weeks Stewards took no action against A. Markham (DREDLOCK ROCKSTAR) or T. Wheeler (FOUR NEEDED).   Barbara Scott, Chief Steward Harness Ph: 9445 5176 Barbara.scott@rwwa.com.au  

MANALAPAN, NJ -- May 14, 2018 -- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that states can legalize sports betting, breaking up Nevada's monopoly on the practice. The court upheld the legality of a 2014 New Jersey law permitting sports betting at casinos and racetracks in the state and voided the federal Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act. Some states see sports betting, like lotteries, as a potentially important source of tax revenue. The Supreme Court justices struck down the entire federal law on a 6-3 vote. "The legalization of sports gambling requires an important policy choice, but the choice is not ours to make. Congress can regulate sports gambling directly, but if it elects not to do so, each state is free to act on its own," Justice Samuel Alito wrote in the majority opinion. The state law at issue would allow people age 21 and above to bet on sports at New Jersey casinos and racetracks but would ban wagers on college teams based in or playing in the state. Shares of several casino companies moved higher following the ruling, including Caesars Entertainment, up 6 percent and Penn National Gaming, up 4 percent. Others gaining included MGM Resorts, Boyd Gaming and Churchill Downs. Wynn Resorts stock recaptured some of its losses from earlier in trading, down 1.9 percent on the day. Industry analysts have said that dozens of states might legalize sports betting if they are not barred from doing so by the federal law. While awaiting Monday's ruling, seven states — Connecticut, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Iowa, New York, Mississippi and West Virginia — had laws prepared to make sports betting legal. Thirteen other states — California, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, Rhode Island and South Carolina — have plans or proposals to consider legalizing sports betting. The ruling takes the U.S. a step closer to legal sports betting in numerous states, possibly even nationwide. Currently, the practice is legal only in select places such as Nevada, home to the gambling capital Las Vegas. The current illegal sports betting market is worth billions of dollars annually. Click here for full article Courtney Stafford  Michael Sheetz, Reuters contributed to this report.

Licensed harness racing owner Mitchell Robertson has been fined $950.00 by the JCA for directing both insulting and abusive words towards Racing Secretary Richard Bromley. Robertson noticed his horses Gunpowder and Ain't Nothing Bettor had been placed on the ballot at the Waimate meeting on 25 March 2018, instead of gaining automatic starts. This upset Mr Robertson as he believed the horses had the necessary credentials to gain a start and were entitled to be drawn into the field and he began a series of abusive phone calls and texts to Mr Bromley. The JCA thought a fine of $1,300 to be the appropriate starting point in this case, but imposed a fine rounded down to the sum of $950 for mitigating factors which are detailed in the JCA report below. The Committee was satisfied that a fine of $950 will suffice to satisfy the general purposes of sentencing which are well-established – to hold the offender accountable for his actions, to promote in the offender a sense of responsibility, to denounce the conduct of the offender and to deter the offender or other persons from committing the same or a similar offence. The Committee has also had regard, as always, to the important consideration of the need to maintain integrity and public confidence in Harness Racing. Full details below:   BEFORE A JUDICIAL COMMITTEE OF THE JUDICIAL CONTROL AUTHORITY IN THE MATTER of the New Zealand Rules of Harness Racing IN THE MATTER of Information No. A10226 BETWEEN N M YDGREN, Chief Stipendiary Steward for the Racing Integrity Unit Informant AND MITCHELL JOHN ROBERTSON, Owner Respondent Judicial Committee: Mr R G McKenzie, Chair - Mr S C Ching, Committee Member Venue: Addington Raceway, Christchurch Present: Mr N M Ydgren, the Informant Mr M J Robertson, the Respondent Mr S P Renault, Stipendiary Steward (Registrar) Date of Hearing: 26 April 2018 Date of Decision: 3 May 2018 RESERVED PENALTY DECISION OF JUDICIAL COMMITTEE The Charge [1] Information No. A10226 alleges that Mr Robertson “wrote and directed insulting and abusive words towards Racing Secretary Richard Bromley” in breach of Rule 1001(1) (v) (ii) of the New Zealand Rules of Harness Racing. The Rules [2] Rule 1001 of the Rules of Harness Racing provides as follows: (1) Every person commits a serious racing offence within the meaning of these Rules, who, in New Zealand or in any other country:- (v) either by himself or in conjunction with any person: (ii) at any time writes or causes to be written, publishes or causes to be published, or utters or causes to be uttered, any insulting or abusive words with reference to a Judicial Committee, Appeals Tribunal, an official of HRNZ, the Chairman, the Vice-Chairman, the Board, a paid official, or any person engaged by a Club or by HRNZ in a professional capacity and/or as an independent contractor. [3] The penalty Rule is Rule 1001 (2) which provides as follows: (1) Every person who commits a serious racing offence shall be liable to the following penalties: (a) a fine not exceeding $30,000.00; and/or (b) suspension from holding or obtaining a licence, for any specific period or for life; and/or (c) disqualification for a specific or for life. [4] Mr Ydgren presented a letter signed by Mr M R Godber, General Manager of the Racing Integrity Unit, pursuant to Rule 1108 (2) authorising the filing of the information. The Plea [5] Mr Robertson had signed the Statement by the Respondent on the information form indicating that he admitted the breach. He was present at the hearing of the information. The charge and relevant Rules were read to him, after which he confirmed that he admitted the breach. [6] The charge was found proved. Summary of Facts [7] Mr Ydgren presented the following written submissions to the hearing: “Mitchell Robertson is a licensed owner with HRNZ and as such is captured by Rule 102 (1) (d). (Rule 102 provides: (1) These Rules shall apply to all Races and Race Meetings and shall apply to and be binding on: (d) all Owners and all persons entering or nominating any horses for any race whether such Owners, trainers or persons in charge be resident in New Zealand or otherwise) He currently has an interest in 17 registered horses. He assists in training responsibilities with his father Peter Robertson who trains in Templeton. Mr Robertson also acts as a bloodstock agent. On the 14th of March 2018, Mr Mitchell Robertson nominated the horses AIN’T NOTHING BETTOR and CALENDAR GIRLZ for the Waimate TC meeting which was to be held on the 25th. This was done via the HRNZ computer login. On the 19th of March, he further nominated TOM RULE and GUNPOWDER for that same meeting. Again, this was done via the HRNZ login. This was done as a job that Mitchell regularly undertook on behalf of his father. The fields were assembled by the Waimate Racing committee on the 21st of March. This committee comprised of Richard Bromley, Gareth Murfitt, Lex Williams and the handicapper Andrew Morris. Soon after the fields were released, Mitchell Robertson noticed his horses GUNPOWDER and AIN’T NOTHING BETTOR had not gained starts but had instead been placed on the ballot. This upset Mr Robertson as he believed the horses had the necessary credentials to gain a start and were entitled to be drawn into the field. Mr Robertson immediately contacted Richard Bromley by cell phone to voice his displeasure. This phone call was made at approximately 1.40pm. The conversation contained comments from Mr Robertson such as “this is f...... bullshit”. Mr Bromley was returning from Waimate at the time of the call and was troubled by poor reception and resultantly the phone call was disconnected. Immediately Mr Robertson reconnected the call and continued to question Mr Bromley on the non-selection of their horses. This call was again disrupted by reception issues and was also disconnected. At 1.47pm Mr Robertson began a series of text messages. The first read “You c.... have no f...... idea no wonder the industry falling apart (sic)” The second, which was sent at 1.48pm, one minute later said, “Don’t f...... hang up”. (Mr Ydgren produced a screen shot of Mr Bromley’s phone confirming those text messages). Mr Bromley did not respond to these messages.” Informant’s Penalty Submissions [8] Mr Ydgren presented the following written penalty submissions to the hearing: “Richard Bromley was serving in his first year as Racing Secretary for the Waimate Trotting Club. He has 12 years’ experience working for other clubs in this role, primarily NZMTC, and enjoys an outstanding reputation as a thorough and efficient staff member within the industry who is extremely well thought of. Stewards’ inquiries have confirmed that Mr Bromley and his colleagues were only employing standard practices that have been used for a number of years. When assessing this incident the Committee should be mindful that no person should be subjected to this kind of treatment when undertaking their formal duties. A person of Mr Bromley’s standing in the industry should reasonably expect that he can go to work and fulfil such duties without receiving such abuse. The direction of such language towards any official is intolerable. Rule 1001 (v) (ii) is a serious racing offence. The maximum penalties in relation to a breach of a serious racing offence are as follows, • A fine not exceeding $30,000 • Suspension from holding or obtaining a licence for life • Disqualification for life Mr Robertson has not appeared before the Stewards in regards to a breach of this or any similar rule. As a young man attempting to forge a career in Harness Racing he finds himself in a less than ideal position on that path. Mr Robertson should be aware of the importance of conducting himself in a professional manner and maintaining integrity in racing. He has admitted the breach at the earliest opportunity and conducted himself in a professional manner throughout the inquiry at all times. Mr Robertson has shown remorse and accepted that his comments were not acceptable. To date, however, he has not apologised. That the comments were in written form does show a degree of premeditation. Along with the language used and the personal nature of them this is an aggravating factor. On this occasion he has made a serious error and the penalty imposed should reflect the nature of that. It should also act as a strong deterrent to any other individual who may feel that addressing any person in a similar manner is acceptable. Other penalties which may assist this Committee are attached. They are that of; • RIU v T Vince 2014 Rule 1001(v)(ii) – Mr Vince fined $1000. • HRNZ v S Dickson 2017 Rule 303(2) Misconduct – Mr Dickson fined $850. The following is a list of misconduct charges which may also assist the Committee. • S LETHABY (12.10.2010) – HR Open Horseman - swearing in the Stewards room and failed to remain when ordered to do so. $650 fine (guideline starting point $500) • R NYHAN (21.07.2009) – HR Open Horseman - insulting language to a Steward. $400 fine • A PYERS (12.03.2013) – HR Open Horseman - offensive and abusive text messages and phone calls to Racecourse Inspector. $850 fine • G VILE (25.06.2014) – TR trainer - abusing a NZTR Handicapper during a telephone conversation. $350 fine • M WALKER (28.03.2009) – Jockey - used insulting and threatening language to another jockey in the weighing area post inquiry. $2,000 fine. A breach of this Rule brings with it a penalty starting point of $1,500 in the JCA guide. Stewards say the appropriate penalty is that of a monetary fine and that the level of that fine should be in the vicinity of $750”. Respondent’s Submissions [9] Mr Robertson confirmed that he accepted the accuracy of the Summary of Facts presented by Mr Ydgren. [10] Mr Robertson said that he was apologetic for his actions and explained that he had acted “in the heat of the moment”. In reply to a question from the Committee, he said that had not made a personal apology to Mr Bromley. He went on to say that he felt angry that the horses had not gained starts as he felt they were each deserving of a start. GUNPOWDER was the highest rated horse in the field. Mr Bromley had explained to him that the selection committee had given preference to horses that had not started in the last week. The Emergency 1 horse was also racing for the second time in a week and it was a one-win horse with approximately $14,000 stakes won and a lower rating, whereas GUNPOWDER, at the time, was a five-win horse with earnings around the $90,000 mark and a better-credentialed horse to have gained a start, Mr Robertson said. [11] Mr Robertson said that he had spoken to Stipendiary Steward, Mr Scott Wallis, the day before the fields came out enquiring as to whether he could leave GUNPOWDER in the nominations for the Wairio TC at Winton on 24 March as a contingency of not getting into the Waimate field. He was advised by Mr Wallis that to do so would involve a breach of the Scratching Penalties Regulation. On the basis that there was no chance that GUNPOWDER would not get a start at Waimate, he withdrew the horse from Wairio. The horses were based at Oamaru, all four (including AIN’T NOTHING BETTOR and CALENDAR GIRLZ) having raced at Forbury Park on 22nd March [12] Mr Ydgren explained that the Waimate selection committee had used discretion to ensure that a wider pool of horses was given the opportunity to race that week. Obviously, Mr Robertson did not agree with that policy but the policy has been in force for some time and in areas such as Canterbury where there is a large horse pool. Mr Robertson’s horses had been accepted at another meeting that week so it was the committee’s decision to place Mr Robertson’s horses on the ballot and horses that had not started elsewhere would thereby be given the opportunity to race. [13] Mr Robertson replied that that did not explain why the first ballot horse, which was also “backing up”, was given preference over GUNPOWDER when the latter had better credentials. [14] In relation to penalty, Mr Robertson told the Committee that they had arranged accommodation in anticipation of the horses racing at the Waimate meeting. This resulted in a “monetary loss”, he said. He had phoned Mr Bromley seeking an explanation on behalf of one of GUNPOWDER’s owners who had phoned him when the fields were published. [15] The conversation with Mr Bromley could have “gone a lot smoother” had it not been for the “reception issues” which created tension when neither he nor Mr Bromley could make himself understood, Mr Robertson said. Mr Bromley had declined to give an explanation, he said. [16] In reply to a question from this Committee, Mr Robertson acknowledged that he was aware of the policy of some Clubs to give preference to horses having their first run for the week but was not aware, at the time, that the Waimate Club was observing that policy. He did not agree that the policy was a fair one. [17] Finally, Mr Robertson said that it was his intention to make a personal apology to Mr Bromley, not for the policy adopted by the Club but for his conduct. The reason that he had not done so before now, he explained, was that he thought it might prejudice this hearing. Reasons for Penalty [18] This charge came about as a result of two horses, TOM RULE and GUNPOWDER, nominated by Mr Robertson for the Waimate TC meeting to be held on 25 March 2018 being denied starts by the fields’ selection committee of the Club. Mr Robertson was particularly upset that one of those horses, GUNPOWDER, had been balloted out with second right of re-entry. [19] Mr Robertson told the Committee and in no uncertain terms that, in his view, GUNPOWDER was deserving of a start based on its compelling “credentials” and, in particular credentials superior to those of the first emergency. The fields for the meeting were posted on the HRNZ website on the Wednesday prior to the Sunday meeting. He noticed that GUNPOWDER was the second emergency in its race. [20] Mr Robertson then acted very precipitously and contacted Mr Bromley, the Secretary of the Club, by cellphone. Mr Bromley was in his car returning to Christchurch. The precise details of the telephone conversation are not before us but Mr Robertson admitted that he used the expression “this is f...... bullshit” during the initial conversation. Reception difficulties were experienced during the telephone conversation. Mr Robertson thought that Mr Bromley had hung up on him. [21] Not wishing to leave the matter there, Mr Robertson then sent following text messages to Mr Bromley’s phone. The relevant text messages, one minute apart, are set out in the Summary of Facts (above). [22] Mr Robertson has now, quite properly in the Committee’s view, admitted the charge of using insulting or abusive words to Mr Bromley, Secretary of the Waimate TC, in breach of Rule 1011 (v) (ii) of the New Zealand Rules of Harness Racing. [23] The Committee accepts that Mr Robertson believed, rightly or wrongly, that he had legitimate grounds to be upset at the exclusion of GUNPOWDER. We refer to that horse specifically because the exclusion of that horse, in particular, seemed to have been the catalyst for Mr Robertson’s behaviour. Whether that is correct or not is not strictly relevant. In any event, his subsequent behaviour towards Mr Bromley was completely unacceptable and cannot be condoned. While Mr Robertson may have felt aggrieved, there were no doubt more acceptable options by way of questioning the committee’s decision. [24] Mr Bromley is, the Committee was told, a well-respected Club official of many years standing who was simply performing his duties, we accept, in good faith and to the best of his ability. We have not lost sight of the fact that Mr Bromley was only one of a committee of four on this occasion, but he has been the one who was subjected to Mr Robertson’s abuse. He should not be expected, and neither should any other official in a similar position be expected, to be subjected to such a barrage of insult and abuse from a disaffected owner. [25] Mitigating factors to take account of in considering penalty in this case are Mr Robertson’s early admission of the breach, his cooperation throughout the course of the investigation and his previous good record. The Informant, in his penalty submissions, said that Mr Robertson had shown remorse for his conduct. The Committee is not satisfied that such remorse is total, supported by the fact that, by his own admission, Mr Robertson had not made a personal apology to Mr Bromley in the more than one month between the date of the offence and the hearing of this charge. We believe that, had his remorse been total, he would have made such an apology in that time. The Committee does not give Mr Robertson credit for showing remorse. [26] We do not identify any particular aggravating factors – they are mainly elements of the offence itself and we have touched upon these earlier in this decision. [27] Mr Ydgren referred the Committee to a number of previous cases in both the harness racing and thoroughbred codes. These are of only limited assistance to us as the fact situations are very different, which will nearly always be so and, furthermore, nearly all of those cases preceded the introduction of the Penalty Guide starting point. [28] The Committee is more inclined to consider the facts of this particular case in the light of the Penalty Guide starting point and the particular aggravating and mitigating factors that have been referred to. [29] The Penalty Guide starting point is a $1,500 fine. That starting point was only included for the first time in the Penalty Guide effective from which renders the cases referred to us by Mr Ydgren of limited assistance. That is the starting point for a mid-range breach of the Rule which. We believe, the present case is in the low-to-mid range. [30] Accordingly, to reflect that, we take a fine of $1,300 to be the appropriate starting point in this case. Applying the mitigating factors to which we have referred, we have come to the conclusion that those factors warrant a discount of 25 per cent from the starting point that we have adopted. Therefore, the Committee imposes a fine rounded down to the sum of $950. [31] The Committee is satisfied that a fine of $950 will suffice to satisfy the general purposes of sentencing which are well-established – to hold the offender accountable for his actions, to promote in the offender a sense of responsibility, to denounce the conduct of the offender and to deter the offender or other persons from committing the same or a similar offence. The Committee has also had regard, as always, to the important consideration of the need to maintain integrity and public confidence in Harness Racing. Penalty [32] Mr Robertson is fined the sum of $950. Costs [33] No order for costs was sought by the Informant and, since the hearing of the information took place on a raceday, there will be no order for costs in favour of the JCA. R G McKenzie (Chair)   Harnesslink Media  

The Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) has advised Harness Racing New South Wales that meloxicam has been detected in the blood sample taken from CORRINYAH CONMAN following its win in race 5, the HUTCHEON & PEARCE PACE (2000m) at Temora on Friday 9 March 2018. The “B” sample has been confirmed by Racing Analytical Services LTD (RASL) in Victoria. Trainer Mr S. Hillier has been advised that HRNSW will continue its investigation into this sample and an inquiry will be conducted in due course. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 183A, it has been determined that CORRINYAH CONMAN, the horse subject of the certificate, shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the outcome of an Inquiry or investigation.    Florist – positive sample THE Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) has advised Harness Racing New South Wales that synephrine has been detected in the urine sample taken from FLORIST following its win in race 5, the DONGES SUPA IGA PACE (1720 metres) conducted at Young on Tuesday 27 February 2018. The “B” sample has been confirmed by Racing Analytical Services LTD (RASL) in Victoria. Trainer Mr M. Johnstone has been advised that HRNSW will continue its investigation into this sample and an inquiry will be conducted in due course. Acting under the provisions of AHRR 183A, it has been determined that FLORIST, the horse subject of the certificate, shall not be nominated or compete in any race until the outcome of an inquiry or investigation.    MICHAEL PRENTICE | INTEGRITY MANAGER (02) 9722 6600 •  mprentice@hrnsw.com.au GRANT ADAMS | CHAIRMAN OF STEWARDS (02) 9722 6600 •  gadams@hrnsw.com.au

Intense exercise is a hazard to racehorses in Ontario and has been linked to hundreds of deaths within the industry, according to a new study from the University of Guelph. Peter Physick-Sheard, an emeritus professor of population medicine, examined 1,709 deaths in Ontario's horse racing industry between 2003 and 2015. "Training and racing at top speed within a short amount of time and space is a health risk for horses," said Physick-Sheard of his study that was released this week in Equine Veterinary Journal. Damage during exercise to the horses' musculoskeletal system, such as fractures, dislocations and tendon ruptures, is the most common underlying problem in the deaths, the study says. The study notes that the immediate cause of death for 97 per cent of those injured horses is euthanasia that occurs shortly after. Dying suddenly ranks second and is closely affiliated with exercise, with those horses either dying on the track, or very shortly after a workout. Since 2003, Ontario has maintained a registry of racehorse deaths that occur within 60 days of a race or trial entry, which provides insight into mortality rates, the study notes. Physick-Sheard studied thoroughbreds, standardbreds and quarter-horses and looked at the differences in mortality both between the breeds and within them. He and his team examined data from about three million race starts — each time a horse starts a race — and official recorded work events along with necropsy reports, the bulk of which were done at the university after a racehorse dies. Thoroughbreds have the highest mortality, the study says, and notes that exercise represents "a far greater hazard for thoroughbreds than standardbreds" with a risk of dying up to eight times higher for thoroughbreds. "The best example is the very high mortality for very young horses, especially stallions, on the thoroughbred side and is associated with exercise, which is an area we should focus on," he said. On the standardbred side, Physick-Sheard said "it's the high mortality that tends to occur off the track. That's really interesting and suggests something procedural and cultural." The study says the rate of deaths off the track for standardbreds is still about half that of thoroughbreds off track. He said his study highlighted important structural factors within the industry that need to be examined more closely, especially those within the thoroughbred world. An oft-stated euphemism within horse racing goes as: standardbreds race to win and thoroughbreds race to breed. That has real world implications on the horses, Physick-Sheard said. Standardbred horses, those used in harness racing, are focused on winning over a long period of time, he said, noting that most begin racing at three years old and can race until they are about 14 years old. "Their type of work and training is much more progressive, much more gradual," he suggested as a possible reason for the lower death rates of standardbred horses. Those horses will often run upwards of 1,000 kilometres before they enter their first race. Standardbred horses have a high mortality that tends to occur off the track, pointing to another area that should be examined, Physick-Sheard said. "That's really interesting and suggests something procedural and cultural," he said. Thoroughbreds are different. "Thoroughbred racing is more intense and progressive, but shorter in duration," Physick-Sheard said. There is more money to be made in thoroughbreds through breeding, rather than from wining races, he said, and making money is more intense for thoroughbreds younger than five years of age. Thoroughbreds generally train with relatively short distances to minimize damage that is punctuated by short, intense bursts on the racetrack. The management of young thoroughbreds, especially those aged two years old, is another area the racing industry should examine further, he said. Physick-Sheard said the study is the "first of its kind" to compare mortality in three racing breeds. The death registry is held by the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario, a Crown agency that regulates the horse racing industry. The AGCO granted the professor access to the data. The AGCO said it has just begun to examine the study. "There is an initiative to review the rules of racing and we're looking at what can be improved and what can help," said Mike Wilson, the manager of racing operations with the AGCO. "The findings (of the study) will be useful in the AGCO's current review." The AGCO said an official investigates every time a horse dies or is injured or there is an incident. "Any time a horse goes down, it's one horse too many," Wilson said. By Liam Casey Reprinted with permission of The Canadian Press

Harness racing trainer Kevin Townley has been fined $11,000 for producing a horse to race when not free of a prohibited substance (Ketoprofen). The horse in question was Geen's Girl who won at Addington on the 2nd March 2018 but has since been disqualified. Mr Townley cannot categorically confirm how the Ketoprofen came to be in the horse’s system on race day but believes that a bottle of E-SE may have been contaminated after giving a horse both Ketoprofen and E-SE that was drawn up into the same syringe. Mr Townley believes that after drawing up the Ketoprofen and then drawing up the E-SE some of the Ketoprofen has been forced into the bottle of E-SE. This is the second breach of the same rule this season for Townley who was also fined $7000 back in March this year when another of his horses Well Defined tested positive to Ketoprofen after winning at Geraldine. The Committee was satisfied that a fine of $11,000 is an appropriate penalty in this case. They believed that such a penalty will satisfy the principal requirements of sentencing – that is to say, to punish the offender, to deter the offender and others in the industry and the need to maintain integrity and public confidence in harness racing.   Full details below: BEFORE A JUDICIAL COMMITTEE IN THE MATTER of the New Zealand Rules of Harness Racing IN THE MATTER of Information No. A7221 BETWEEN KYLIE ROCHELLE WILLIAMS, Racing Investigator for the Racing Integrity Unit Informant AND KEVIN DAVID TOWNLEY of Christchurch, Licensed Public Trainer and Open Driver Respondent Date of Hearing: 28 April 2018 Venue: Ashburton Racecourse, Ashburton Judicial Committee: Mr SC Ching (Chairman) Mr GJ Clapp (Committee Member) Present: Mrs KR Williams, the Informant Mr KD Townley, the Respondent Mr R Quirk, Stipendiary Steward (Registrar) Date of Decision: 30 April 2018 RESERVED DECISION OF JUDICIAL COMMITTEE The Charge [1] Information No. A7221 alleges that: On the 2nd March 2018, Kevin David TOWNLEY, being the registered trainer of the standardbred GEENA’S GIRL presented the horse to race in Race 8, the PAM & IVAN LAWSON HANDICAP TROT, at the New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club’s meeting with a prohibited substance, namely Ketoprofen, in its system. This is in breach of the Prohibited Substance Rule, Rule 1004(1A) (3)(4). The Rules [2] Rule 1004 of the Rules of Harness Racing provides as follows: (1) A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances. (2) Where a horse is taken, or is to be taken, to a racecourse for the purpose of engaging in a race otherwise that in accordance with sub-rule (1) the trainer of the horse commits a breach of these Rules. (4) A breach of these Rules under sub-rule (2) or sub-rule (3) is committed regardless of the circumstances in which the prohibited substance came to be present in or on the horse. [3] Mrs Williams presented a letter signed by Mr MR Godber, General Manager of the RIU, pursuant to Rule 1108(2) authorising the filing of the information. The Plea [4] Mr Townley had signed the Statement by the Respondent at the foot of the information form indicating that he admitted the breach of the Rule. He confirmed this at the hearing. Summary of Facts [5] (1) GEENA'S GIRL is a 4-year-old Brown mare and is trained by Mr Kevin David TOWNLEY. GEENA'S GIRL is owned by Mr Townley’s wife, Mrs M E Townley, Mrs K J Thomas, R N Campbell and G C Rugg. GEENA'S GIRL has raced 20 times for 2 wins and lifetime stakes of $17,237 as at 20 April 2018. (2) GEENA'S GIRL was correctly entered and presented to race by trainer Mr Kevin Townley at the New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club meeting on 2 March 2018. GEENA'S GIRL was driven in Race 8, the IVAN LAWSON HANDICAP TROT by Ms S Ottley, winning the race and a stake of $5,300. This stake has not been paid out. (3) Following the race, the Stipendiary Stewards ordered that GEENA'S GIRL be post-race swabbed. GEENA'S GIRL entered the swab box at 9.19pm and Swabbing Steward Mr G Johnston obtained a urine sample from the mare at 9.22pm. The race was programmed to start at 9.00pm. The urine sample was taken in the presence of stable representative Mr K Stevens. The urine samples were recorded with the Sample number 133764. Mr Stevens and Mr Townley do not contest the taking of the sample. (4) On the 14th March 2018 the New Zealand Racing Laboratory reported Ketoprofen was detected in Sample Number 133764. The Control Sample was clear. (5) On the 16th of March 2018 Racecourse Investigators Mrs K R Williams and Mr PR Lamb went to the training establishment of Mr Townley, 59 Russley Road, Christchurch, and advised him of the positive swab returned by GEENA'S GIRL. (6) Mr Townley was given a copy of the Certificate of Analysis, Copy of the Swab Card, RIU Swabbing Record Book and Race Results. (7) Mr Townley advised that he took GEENA'S GIRL to the races in his own float and that the mare was one of two horses he had racing that night. (8) Mr Townley could not initially offer an explanation for the presence of Ketoprofen in the urine sample taken from GEENA'S GIRL and could not advise when the mare was last treated with Ketoprofen. (9) Mr Townley keeps a diary in which he enters treatments. There were no treatments recorded for Ketaprofen or E-SE for GEENA’S GIRL, but she was treated with Alamycin on 28 February 2018. Mr Townley does not record all treatments of E-SE as this does not have a withholding time. (10) Mr Townley now keeps his medication in a safe since his previous positive swab with WELL DEFINED on 3 February 2018. One bottle of Key Injection and two bottles of E-SE were in the safe. (11) The bottle of “Key Injection” which contains Ketoprofen was in the safe which noted a 4 day withhold on the box and this was also written on the bottle by the administering Veterinarian. It was written by the Veterinarian on the bottle to use 10ml I/V (intravenously). On the box it states 10ml per 450kg bw (body weight). The bottle was one of two supplied on 26 July 2017. (12) Mr Townley advised that he sometimes treats the horses one/two days out from racing with E-SE. (13) Mr Townley advised that he has previously given horses a mixture of Ketoprofen and E-SE at least 4.2 days out from racing with the products being drawn up into the same syringe. Mr Townley advised that he generally draws up the E-SE first and then the Ketoprofen but he believes that he may have drawn them up the other way around thus contaminating the bottle of E-SE. (14) The bottle of Key Injection and the two bottles of E-SE Injection were sent to the New Zealand Racing Laboratory for testing. (15) Mr Townley advised that GEENA'S GIRL had never had any lameness issues, but he makes a point of going over his horses once they have worked and checks for any muscle soreness or any signs of tying up for which Mr Townley then administers Ketoprofen if needed outside the withholding time. (16) Mr Townley is well aware of the 4.2 day withholding time for Ketoprofen and is particular to adhere to any withholding time of any drug. (17) Mr Townley when administering Ketoprofen always administers 10ml as directed by the Veterinarian. (18) The New Zealand Racing Laboratory advised on 3 April 2018 the results of the three bottles taken from Mr Townley’s safe. The Key Injection bottle contained Ketoprofen with the concentration as stated on the label. One of the E-SE Injection bottles had broken in transportation so could not be tested. Ketoprofen was not detected in the second bottle of E-SE. (19) Mr Townley has had five horses swabbed since the first positive swab with WELL DEFINED on 3 February 2018. Swabs: - WELL DEFINED - 3 February 2018 - positive - RUNNING FREE - 23 February 2018 - clear - GEENA’S GIRL - 2 March 2018 - positive - NURBURGRING - 9 March 2018 - clear - ETHEREAL - 16 March 2018 - clear (pre-race) - RUNNING FREE - 16 March 2018 - clear (pre-race) Mr Townley advised that those that have returned positive swabs were given E-SE while those that were clear were not given E-SE. The 16th of March was the day that Mr Townley was advised of the positive swab returned by GEENA’S GIRL. (20) Mr Townley has been training since 1986/87 initially in partnership with D J Townley and then on his own from 1994/95. Mr Townley has trained over 460 winners. (21) Mr Townley was charged with a breach of the prohibited substance rule in Australia in 2003 for Clenbuterol and was fined $2,000 with a three-month suspension, suspended for 12 months. (22) Mr Townley admitted a breach of presenting WELL DEFINED with Ketoprofen in its system on 3 February 2018 and was fined $7,000. Submissions of Informant on Penalty [6] (1) Mr Townley has pleaded guilty to a breach of Rules 1004(1A) (3)(4) after presenting GEENA'S GIRL at the races with a prohibited substance in its system, namely Ketoprofen, at the New Zealand Metropolitan TC meeting on the 2nd March 2018. (2) The penalty provisions that apply in this case are outlined in Rule 1004(7). 1004(7) Every person who commits a breach of sub-rule (2) or (3) shall be liable to: (a) a fine not exceeding $20,000; and/or (b) be disqualified or suspended from holding or obtaining a licence for any specific period not exceeding five years. (3) The rules also require the mandatory disqualification of the horse: Rule 1004(8) states: 1004(8) Any horse connected with a breach of sub-rule (1), (2), or (3) shall be disqualified from any race entered and/or liable to a period of disqualification not exceeding five years. 1004D Any horse which has been taken to a racecourse for the purpose of engaging in a race which is found to have administered to it or ingested by it any prohibited substance shall be disqualified from that race. (4) Sentencing Principles - The four principles of sentencing can be summarised briefly ● Penalties are designed to punish the offender for his / her wrongdoing. They are not retributive in the sense that the punishment is disproportionate to the offence but the offender must be met with a punishment. ● In a racing context it is extremely important that a penalty has the effect of deterring others from committing like offences. ● A penalty should also reflect the disapproval of the J.C.A for the type of behaviour in question. ● The need to rehabilitate the offender should be taken into account. The first three principles are particularly important here. (5) Relevant Precedents – In addition to the sentencing principles the Judicial Committee should have regard to relevant precedence. R.I.U. v C & A Edmonds – 31 March 2016 Subject: Ketoprofen positive with two horses – fined $9,000. Extract from Edmonds’decision: “The Committee finds that it was negligent on the part of the Respondents to leave their medication cabinet unlocked and this is an aggravating factor.” NZTR v A Scott – 22 November 2010 Subject: Ketoprofen positive with a thoroughbred – fined $6,000, costs $750 NZTR, $600 JCA. NZTR v K & L Rae – 28 May 2009 Subject: Ketoprofen positive with a thoroughbred – fined $4,000, costs $3,000 NZTR, $500 JCA. NZTR v AW Pike & M Donoghue – 22 August 2008 Subject: Ketoprofen positive with a thoroughbred – fined $6,000. R.I.U v KD Townley - 12 March 2018 Subject: Ketoprofen positive with a standardbred - fined $7,000. R.I.U. v JM Whittaker – 17 August 2015 Subject: Caffeine positive with a horse – fined $1,000, costs $1,800. Extract from Whittaker decision: “RIU v L J Justice (2011) where that Committee stated ….. penalties will be imposed for breaches of the rule which will recognise, reinforce and give effect to the pivotal significance of the rule in maintaining the integrity of racing, whether or not culpable conduct is involved. Naturally where culpable conduct is involved, penalties imposed will normally be greater than in cases where such conduct is absent, but we think it is wrong and contrary to the intent and purpose of the rule to assume the absence of culpable conduct should attract no, or only a token penalty.” R.I.U. v PM Williamson – 10 December 2012 Subject: Procaine positive with a horse – fined $3,500, costs $350 to JCA. The source of the positive swab was not identified. “Against those factors is the ever-present need to maintain the integrity of and public confidence in harness racing by adequately punishing the breach and deterring Mr Williamson and others from offending in a similar manner in the future.” The EVA withholding time of 4.2 days is only a guideline. Veterinary Council of New Zealand v Dr P Casey - 8 July 2013 “In October 2011, a revised list entitled “NZEVA Prohibited Substance Recommended Withholding Times” was issued. Amongst other cautionary statements, it stated: “The information in this list is predominantly derived from NZ practitioner experience and not necessarily from scientific studies with adequate numbers of animals. This guideline includes a buffer time to allow for individual variation between horses’ drug excretion times. The list does not however, account absolutely for the possibility that an individual horse may have a delayed elimination period for a substance because of the slow metabolism of that animal, delayed hepatic conjugational renal clearance, the interaction of more than one treatment use concurrently, the “stepping” of multiply (sic) treatments over days accumulating to high body levels, or the normal statistical variations seen in individuals…. adherence by veterinarians to the administration guidelines in the NZEVA Prohibited Substance Recommended Withholding List will ensure that their obligations under the NZEVA Professional Code of Conduct are being met.” Aggravating Features [7] Mr Townley cannot categorically confirm how the Ketoprofen came to be in the horse’s system on race day but believes that a bottle of E-SE may have been contaminated after giving a horse both Ketoprofen and E-SE that was drawn up into the same syringe. Mr Townley believes that after drawing up the Ketoprofen and then drawing up the E-SE some of the Ketoprofen has been forced into the bottle of E-SE. The amount forced into the bottle would need to be significant to cause a future positive, especially for it to be over the regulatory limit of 100 micrograms per litre. This is unlikely as a half amount of Ketoprofen (5ml) would need to be administered for it still to be in its system on race day two days later or 2.5ml if given one day out. Any ketoprofen would also be diluted by the E-SE that was still in the bottle. The Racing Laboratory reported no presence of Ketoprofen in the bottle of E-SE that was tested with the other bottle being unable to be tested. The same bottle that was previously found on the property after Mr Townley’s positive with GEENA’s GIRL was still present and Mr Townley continued to treat horses without seeking Veterinary advice. This bottle was not purchased for a specific horse but was to be used on any horse in the stable that showed signs of muscle soreness or tie up. Again, at Mr Townley’s discretion. Trainers run the risk of errors and must bear the consequence if they elect to mix and/or self-administer drugs without the continued guidance of a Veterinarian. The bottles of Key Injection were purchased in July 2017, several months earlier. Mr Townley cannot confirm what day he may have treated or when GEENA'S GIRL was last treated with Ketoprofen or E-SE as there is no note in his diary. Mr Townley keeps a diary but admits that he does not always record treatments. Mr Townley previously admitted a breach of the rule only a month earlier with the same drug and the only change he has implemented since then was to put the drugs in a safe. Mr Townley has not improved his recording of any administration as there is no record of GEENA’S GIRL being treated with Ketoprofen or E-SE. Mr Townley was charged with a breach in 2003 for Clenbuterol in Australia. Mitigating Factors [8] Mr Townley admits full liability as the trainer and admitted the breach at the first opportunity and has cooperated fully throughout the investigation. Mr Townley has been training for over 30 years and has trained over 460 winners. Conclusion [9] The Racing Integrity Unit seeks a monetary penalty of a fine of $12,000. The reason for this figure is that the JCA guidelines, 1st May 2015, have a starting point of $8,000 for a first offence of presenting a horse with a drug in its system. This is Mr Townley’s second offence within a month. Mr Townley has to be given credit for the manner in which he has conducted himself during this enquiry and admitting the breach at the first opportunity however the onus is on trainers at all times to ensure that a horse in their care and control is completely drug free when presented at the races. We also seek the disqualification of GEENA'S GIRL under Rule 1004(8). The RIU are not seeking to recover any costs in this matter. Respondent’s Submissions Mr Townley presented the following written submissions; [10] This is a devastating turn of events and to explain it I must return to my previous case in February as the two are intertwined. In the case of Well Defined I was shocked and bewildered as I had no memory of giving him Ketaprofen. I also consulted my diary and there was also no record of it. I “could not offer an explanation for the presence of Ketaprofen in the urine sample taken from Well Defined and could not advise when the gelding was last treated with Ketaprofen”. Shock and circumstances at the time forced me to say, “I must have given it to Well Defined, but I am very sure I did not administer it to him inside the guidelines as I am extremely aware and careful when I have horses racing”. I said this as there appeared to be no other explanation. 10 days after receiving this news I lined up Geena’s Girl and ended up here again. I did not treat Geena’s Girl with Ketaprofen and had no entry in my diary. Who in their right mind would do this after what had just happened and of course knowing we would be swabbed if winning. There is not a shadow of doubt in my mind now as to what has happened. I did not knowingly give Well Defined or Geena’s Girl Ketaprofen at all and my diary was correct in both cases. The cause can only be this: I quite often give my horse injectable vitamin E + selenium known as E-SE. On odd occasions I may get a horse show signs of muscle tie-up and if NOT RACING I will mix ESE and Ketaprofen in one syringe and treat them. I have done this for decades with no problems, but I must always be careful to take the E-SE first, then the Ketaprofen, so as not to contaminate the E-SE. Doing this the reverse way has to be the cause of these two positive swabs with Well Defined getting E-SE about 28hrs before racing and Geena’s Girl I believe about 36hrs. I am guilty of making ONE mistake, genuine human error, causing BOTH of these cases. As we did not realise at the time that this was the cause of Well Defined being positive, I have innocently done the same thing again. During this time, I had several negative swabs with horses I did not give E-SE. I was gutted when a bottle taken by the RIU for testing was broken and my proof gone. I use very little Ketaprofen. Mrs Williams has established that I bought 2 bottles in July 2017 and in 9 months since I have used about 1.5 bottles. 15 doses, which equates to 1 dose per horse in my team over 9 months. I have never given it to a horse less than 4.2 day from a race. It is normally only used on horses not racing. I have been licensed and training for 52 years to reach this low point and sincerely hope you can see this as the result of 1 mistake I have made and have already paid a hefty price for. Respondents submissions on Penalty [11] Mr Townley said he took issue with the aggravating features stated in the Penalty submissions as presented by Mrs Williams, which stated that Mr Townley could “not categorically confirm how the Ketaprofen came to be in the horse’s system on race day”. Mr Townley stated that he now has no doubt at all how the Ketaprofen came to be in the horse’s system. He said there were two things that could prove his point, firstly, the used bottle of E-SE that went away to be tested, as his luck would go, was broken and there was no way to know whether the used bottle of E-SE was contaminated with Ketaprofen as he submitted. The only other way he could get proof was to ask his vet if he could do a blind test on a horse, to which the vets reply was that the RIU would not let him use the lab for testing. Mr Townley stated that the two things that could have proved his explanation were taken away. He said the only way that GEENA’S GIRL had Ketaprofen in her system on race-day was the cross contamination of the 2 bottles where he mistakenly drew the Ketaprofen first, then whilst drawing the E-SE, Ketaprofen contaminated the bottle of E-SE. He said he would normally draw the ESE first and top off the syringe with the Ketaprofen but was certain he had mistakenly reversed this procedure leading to the contamination of the E-SE bottle. He said both WELL DEFINED and GEENA’S GIRL were treated the day before the races with ESE out of the same bottle which he said was contaminated and caused both positive swabs. Mr Townley also took issue with the statement in the Summary of Facts where the RIU stated that such a small amount of Ketaprofen from a contamination would not return a positive reading of 157micrograms per litre, 100 micrograms per litre being the regulatory threshold limit. He submitted a drop could cause a positive. In answer to a question from Mr Townley, Mrs Williams stated that in order for enough Ketaprofen to show above the threshold of 100 micrograms per litre, the amount forced into the bottle by cross contamination would have to be significant. She reiterated, as stated in Penalty submissions, that with a 4.2 day withholding time for Ketaprofen, with a standard dose, submitted that at least 1ml would need to be administered the day before the races to show as above 100 micrograms per millilitre. This she said, in her opinion, made contamination of the E-SE bottle unlikely. Mr Townley refuted this and said he knew a lot about Ketaprofen. He submitted that a tiny drop of Ketaprofen would be detectable and cause a positive swab. He also stated that not a lot of testing had been done and there was no science to prove what level of Ketaprofen would show as over the threshold the next day. He said that there was also no science or proof that what he said did not happen. Mr Townley said there was no intent to administer and submitted that both the WELL DEFINED and GEENA’S GIRL cases should be treated as the same case with the same mistake happening with both horses, that being the contaminated bottle of E-SE. He said he made one mistake and got two horses with positives. Mr Townley also stated that he had raced other horses in between the positive swabs which were clear swabs and he had not treated any of those with E-SE. This, he said, supported the cross-contamination explanation he had submitted. He submitted that both positives were from the same contaminated bottle of E-SE. Disqualification of the horse [12] (1) Mrs Williams referred to Rule 1004D of the Rules of Harness Racing which provides: Any horse which has been taken to a racecourse for the purpose of engaging in a race which is found to have administered to it or ingested any prohibited substance shall be disqualified from the race. (2) Mrs Williams said that the winning stake has not been paid out. Mrs Williams sought disqualification of GEENA’S GIRL. (3) The Committee ordered that GEENA’S GIRL be disqualified from Race 5, Pam and Ivan Lawson Handicap Trot, at the meeting of NZMTC held at Addington on 2 March 2018, effective Monday 30 April 2018. As a consequence of the disqualification, the amended result for the Race is as follows: 1st Tehoro Dazzle 2nd Rachmaninov 3rd Chivision 4th Motu Great Sensation 5th Beyond The Horizon 6th Natives Lasting Love The Committee ordered that stakes for the Race be paid in accordance with that amended result. Reasons for Penalty [13] The relevant penalty Rule is Rule 1004 (7) which provides: (1) Every person who commits a breach of sub-rule (2) or (3) shall be liable to: (a) a fine not exceeding $20,000.00; and/or (b) be disqualified or suspended from holding or obtaining a licence for any specific period not exceeding five years. (2) The Committee notes that the maximum fine under Rule 1004 (7) (a) was increased by Harness Racing New Zealand from $10,000 to $20,000 in 2011, reflecting the desire of that body to provide a greater deterrent. In the Committee’s view, penalties imposed for breaches of the Rule prior to March 2011 need to be looked at in the light of that. (3) The principal mitigating factors, to which the Committee has had regard in determining penalty, are Mr Townley’s early admission of the breach and the way in which he has conducted himself throughout the enquiry. (4) Against those factors is the ever-present need to maintain the integrity of and public confidence in harness racing by adequately punishing the breach and deterring Mr Townley and others from offending in a similar manner in the future. (5) The previous breach by Mr Townley in February 2018, a month prior to this breach, is an obvious significant aggravating factor. Mr Townley was then fined the sum of $7,000. (6) Mr Townley’s lengthy submissions on what he believed happened to cause GEENA’S GIRL to have Ketaprofen in her system were taken into consideration. Mr Townley put to the Committee an explanation for the positive for GEENA’S GIRL which he also submitted was the reason for the WELL DEFINED positive to Ketaprofen, being the contamination of the bottle of E-SE. This Committee has doubt and attaches little or no weight with this explanation as the amount of Ketaprofen detected in both horses was above the regulatory threshold of 100 micrograms per litre. We, however, agree with the submissions of the RIU and determined that on the balance of probabilities, it would be highly unlikely that a contamination of the bottle of E-SE, as described by Mr Townley, would produce positive readings of Ketaprofen at the levels detected. It is therefore difficult to know what actually happened to GEENA’S GIRL to have Ketaprofen in her system on 2 March 2018. What is obvious to this Committee is that Ketaprofen has been administered to the mare inside the 4.2 day withholding period to produce a reading of 157 milligrams per litre and that Mr Townley is ultimately responsible for that, however it got into the horse’s system. (7) The Informant has not alleged that Mr Townley had deliberately administered the prohibited substance to GEENA’S GIRL and the Committee has no basis for any finding that he did so. (8) Nevertheless, the Committee finds that Mr Townley was negligent in a number of respects, as submitted by Mrs Williams. Mr Townley had 10 days between the notification of the WELL DEFINED positive and the race in question for GEENA’S GIRL, but only elected to make 1 change to his procedures and routines by way of a medication safe. WELL DEFINED’s positive should have been a “red flag” to Mr Townley to investigate what had led to this. We believe that after a positive is detected in a stable, a prudent trainer would immediately stop all current practices and procedures and engage in a thorough review of these until it could be established what had caused the wrongful administration. We also believe that a prudent trainer should also seek the professional assistance and guidance of a veterinary surgeon and not continue on self-administering drugs until it could be again, established what process had caused the positive. Mr Townley, however, continued on with his established procedures and practices and has found himself with this breach, a second within a month. (9) The JCA Penalty Guide provides a starting point for a 2nd breach of this rule with a 2-year disqualification and a $10,000 fine. The RIU are not seeking disqualification and we, also, are not considering disqualification with this case. Mr Townley was fined the sum of $7,000 for his breach in February 2018, only 1 month prior to this breach for the same drug, Ketaprofen. Having regard to this being the second breach of this Rule by Mr Townley, we adopted the $10,000 starting point and determined that the aggravating factors in this case warranted an uplift in penalty. This we set at $3,000. The mitigating factors are also worthy of consideration, being Mr Townley’s early admission of the breach and his full cooperation throughout the investigation. For these factors, Mr Townley is deserved of a discount which we set at $2,000. (10) Having regard to all of the matters referred to above, the Committee is satisfied that a fine of $11,000 is an appropriate penalty in this case. We believe that such a penalty will satisfy the principal requirements of sentencing – that is to say, to punish the offender, to deter the offender and others in the industry and the need to maintain integrity and public confidence in harness racing. Penalty [14] Mr Townley is fined the sum of $11,000.00. Costs [15] Mrs Williams did not seek any award of costs in favour of the Racing Integrity Unit and, accordingly, no order is made. [16] As this hearing was heard at a race meeting there was no order for costs to the JCA. S C Ching Chairman   Harnesslink Media

Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards have issued a charge against licensed trainer Jason McNaulty under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 190(1) which states:      A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances It is alleged that Mr McNaulty presented the horse ‘Fratellino NZ’ to race at Maryborough on 2 February 2018 when not free of the prohibited substance heptaminol. Mr McNaulty has been issued with a further charge for failing to keep and maintain a log book in accordance with the AHRR. The charge will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed. Harness Racing Victoria

On 25 January 2018, licensed trainer/driver Mr Larry Eastman was convicted in the Bendigo Magistrates Court of five criminal charges that included using corrupt conduct information for betting purposes and engaging in conduct that corrupts or would corrupt a betting outcome of an event. Subsequently, Harness Racing Victoria (HRV) Stewards have issued a charge against Mr Larry Eastman under Australian Harness Racing Rule (AHRR) 267 which states: Subject to sub-rule (2) the Stewards may for such period and on such conditions as they think fit, disqualify a person who is found guilty of a crime or an offence in any State or Territory of Australia or in any country. As a result of Mr Eastman’s conviction and through further investigations by HRV Stewards, charges have also been issued against the following licensed persons;  Mr Scott Dyer (8 charges), Ms Lynette Eastman (3 Charges) and Mr Danny O’Bree (2 Charges). All charges will be heard by the HRV Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on a date to be fixed.     Harness Racing Victoria

Harness Racing South Australia Stewards today conducted a hearing into an adverse test result returned by PRINCESS CLEOPATRA following its win in Race 4 at Port Pirie on Friday 12th January 2018. The particulars being that a post-race sample taken from PRINCESS CLEOPATRA was shown to contain Cobalt at a mass concentration greater than the permissible tolerance.  Mr Sims admitted a resultant breach of Rule (AHHR) 190(1) which states “A horse shall be presented for a race free of prohibited substances”  After considering submissions on penalty and after having regard to the following relevant factors: The nature of the substance detected and the seriousness of the offence in all of the circumstances. The level reported by the Racing Analytical Services Ltd, which was toward the lower end. Mr Sims’s personal circumstances, including his length of involvement in harness racing industry Mr Sim’s submissions with respect to the medications employed in the treatments of his horses, which the Stewards were satisfied was the primary cause for irregularity reported. • Penalties imposed in South Australia and other jurisdictions in relation to this prohibited substance. Mr Sim’s co-operation during the currency of the investigation The need for both specific and general deterrence The Stewards determined that Mr Sims be disqualified for a period of eight months with such disqualification to commence at midnight on Tuesday 15th May 2018.  Acting under the provisions of AHRR 195, PRINCESS CLEOPATRA was disqualified from first placing in Race 4 at Port Pirie 12th January 2018 and Stewards directed that the placing’s be amended accordingly. All enquiries to Ross Neal /Chairman of Stewards rneal@saharness.org.au

Millstone Township, NJ - April 25, 2018 -  The last three of the 21 trotters and pacers in the kill pens the Standardbred Retirement Foundation (SRF) is trying to keep from slaughter, have a reprieve, but do not have homes, Valid Moment, Native Avenue, and DeMartini. They do have donations to care for them until SRF can hopefully find them homes. Secret Impression who has a home is now sick and injured. A veterinarian has been called. Her home is now pending.   SRF expresses its heartfelt gratitude for the support received for these horses. It's been a stressful six days trying to pull it all together, very sad to have had to do this at all, but a few sweet things have come from this effort. Four horses had their past owners take them home, and help came from a horse that was considered rescued himself, St. Elmo Hero, who went on to earn nearly $800,000 for his owner John Barnard.   Josh Green, one of 21 owners of Skedaddle Hanover, during his racing career, owning him for just 6 months,stated, "I don't understand how people can be in racing and not fall in love with and appreciate how hard these horses try for us." Eric Goodell and Josh Green took Mr. Mystic N, one from this group, home on the same day they heard he was in trouble.    We were surprised that the United States Trotting Association, (USTA) chose not to pick up SRF's press releases, as their readers are people more closely associated with these animals than anyone, especially past breeders, owners, trainers, and fans. These are the people who should have this information. The USTA states that they do not have a policy on slaughter. It is well known that some of the directors oppose it and some are pro slaughter. We suggest that when members vote their new directors in that they pose that question before casting a vote.    Homes are still needed.       To offer a home, make a tax-deductible gift to help any of the other 390 horses inSRF's program, or to sponsor one, contact SRF 732-446-4422 or email SRF.Horseandkids@Adoptahorse.org. To see some of the other 390, to sponsor one, adopt one, or make a gift click here AdoptaHorse.org/Donate.    Standardbred Retirement Foundation | AdoptaHorse.org | Judith Bokman

Harness Racing participants Dayl March and Leonard Cain have had their licences reinstated after charges of race fixing against them were dropped last week.  The Brisbane Magistrates' Court dismissed the charges, citing a lack of evidence in both cases.  It is believed the Magistrate indicated in March’s case that there was insufficient evidence to proceed and the charges were subsequently withdrawn, The Courier Mail reported last week.  In the case of Cain, it is understood the prosecution asked for more time to produce witnesses, but the submission was rejected and the case dismissed. QRIC Commissioner Ross Barnett said both March and Cain had applied to have their racing licences reinstated.  “Mr Cain’s suspension has been lifted effective immediately and he is able to resume under his licence which remains current," Commissioner Barnett said.  “The licence of Mr March expired through the suspension period and he will be issued a renewal application directly. The suspension has been lifted however no current licence is in place at this stage. “QRIC stewards have yet to examine the circumstances of each case to determine whether any further action should be taken.” While March and Cain challenged their charges, former driver Barton Cockburn was fined $5,000 in October last year after pleading guilty to three charges relating to race fixing.  Cockburn was warned off all race tracks for life following his conviction. By Nick Hluchaniuk Reprinted with permission of The Punters

Race-fixing cases against harness racing participants Dayl March and Leonard Cain were dismissed in Brisbane Magistrates’ Court this week, leaving the Queensland Racing Integrity Commission and the Racing Crime Squad red-faced. Both decisions cited a lack of evidence as the reason for the dismissals. The cases of March and Cain were the first match-fixing charges to be contested in court relating to QRIC’s harness racing investigations, which were conducted by the Racing Crime Squad. Last October, Barton Cockburn pleaded guilty to three charges of match fixing, pertaining to races in November 2016 and was fined $5000. Soon after, Michael Grant also pleaded guilty to different charges relating to the same inquiry. At the time, Integrity Commissioner Ross Barnett said Cockburn’s conviction “should put an end to industry speculation about whether the Commission would be able to gather sufficient evidence to obtain convictions”. “I hope the fact that two of the three people we’ve charged so far have now pleaded guilty will be a reflection of the evidence that was gathered in these matters,” Barnett said at the time. However, Cain and March chose to defend the charges and their cases were thrown out of court on Wednesday and Thursday. It is understood in the case of trainer-driver March, the Magistrate indicated there was insufficient evidence to proceed and the charges were subsequently withdrawn. Harness driver Leonard Cain had his race-fixing case dismissed in the Brisbane Magistrates’ Court.  In the case of Cain, a harness driver, it is understood the prosecution asked for more time to produce witnesses, but the submission was rejected and the case dismissed. Both QRIC and the Queensland Police Service declined to comment on the March and Cain dismissals on Friday. March has been sidelined and unable to compete since having his license suspended in April last year. Initially he did not seek a stay of proceedings because he had hoped the matter would be resolved quickly. Later, when it became apparent the case would drag on, he was denied the stay. Originally published as Race-fixing cases thrown out of court   By Nathan Exelby   Reprinted with permission of news.com.au    

An Australian gambler was able to parlay A$1,600 (US$1,245) into an incredible A$56,000 (US$43,000) after pulling off an upset win during a horserace in February 2013. While he basked in his winnings and the attention he received after the long-shot victory, some began quietly questioning how it was possible. The truth has finally come out, with the gambler among 78 looking at charges of fraud. Edward Ridgway was the prophet who foresaw Alma’s Fury winning the race that day. The track was wet, which always resulted in a poor performance by the horse. Always, except for one race. That win unleashed an investigation that uncovered a history of fraudulent bets. All of the bets were perpetrated by the same individual, Stephen Charles Fletcher, who was already in hot water for receiving insider information in various gambling activities, according to The Sydney Morning Herald report. Fletcher was first introduced to authorities in 2006 after he and his betting partner, Eddie Hayson, had won millions wagering on a rugby match. Authorities accused the pair of learning prior to the match that a key player wouldn’t be on the field due to an injury, and used the information to enter their bets. Both Fletcher and Hayson denied the allegations, and there wasn’t enough proof for a conviction. However, Fletcher was subsequently banned from gambling. From September 2012 to March 2013, Fletcher used the identities of 77 individuals, including police officers, to continue his betting activities, according to the report. He has been shown to have been behind bets placed at a number of horserace tracks around Australia, and also in Hong Kong and Singapore. In one instance, he used Ridgway’s account in a horserace in Hong Kong, turning US$233 into US$13,774. In February 2013, Fletcher made 28 bets under the names of others in racing events ranging from greyhounds in Western Australia to harness racing in Penrith. Former police officers Senior Constable Marc Smith and Senior Constable Tony Williams were also caught up in the investigation. The duo face charges for soliciting fellow officers to join in on the fraud. It has been determined that Williams met Fletcher through the latter’s friend, Crown Prosecutor Margaret Cunneen, who is also under investigation. Fletcher has now been charged with 78 counts of “dishonestly obtaining a financial advantage by deception.” Each charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in an Aussie prison. Knowing his propensity for using others’ identities, authorities will probably want to make sure it’s really him before sending him away. By Erik Gibbs Reprinted with permission of Calvinayre.com site

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