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ANDERSON, IN - Although she did not assume command until the half-mile marker, the result of the $172,000 Moni Maker was never in much doubt as world champion Manchego (Yannick Gingras) collected the 19th victory of her career with ease on Friday (Sept. 21) at Hoosier Park Racing & Casino on spectacular stakes-laden car. "This is very meaningful for me as this race is named after one of the most wonderful mares I have trained," said Jimmy Takter, the filly's trainer. "But this filly is quite special too." Leaving from post position 10, Manchego and Gingras settled in fourth place trotting away from the gate and were content to follow Custom Cantab through a first quarter-mile in :27.3. Shortly before the field of 10 hit the half-mile pole, Gingras unleashed Manchego and the daughter of Muscle Hill went straight to the top, while Hey Blondie (Andrew McCarthy) settled into second with Custom Cantab (Peter Wrenn) dropping back to third. After a half-mile in :56.2, Manchego pulled away from her rivals to post a 1:25.2 three-quarter mark, then cruised through the lane to stop the clock in 1:53. Custom Cantab was second and Seviyorum was third. Manchego, who is owned by Black Horse Racing, John Fielding and Herb Liverman, paid $2.20 as the 1-2 favorite. Custom Cantab (14-1) provided her supporters with $5 to place and Seviyorum (25-1) paid (25-1). Proof victorious in The Elevation Scott Zeron placed the 1-9 favorite, Proof, on the lead shortly before the half-mile marker and the 2-year-old son of A Rocknroll Dance-Ginger And Fred paced strongly to the finish to improve his record to a sparkling 7-5-2-0 in the $120,000 Elevation Stakes. Trained by Brian Brown and competing as a homebred for Diamond Creek Racing, Proof ($2.20) tripped the timer in 1:52. Loutenant (Matt Kakaley) was second ($4.80) with Pure Rock (John DeLong, $3.60) third. Warrawee Ubeaut, Woodside Charm Kentuckiana Stallion Management Stakes winners With Yannick Gingras in the bike, Warrawee Ubeaut returned to the winner's circle after two consecutive losses with a statement triumph in the $207,000 division of the Kentuckiana Stallion Management Stakes. Trained by Ron Burke, the daughter of Sweet Lou-Great Memories used a pocket trip to pass Zero Tolerance (David Miller) in mid-stretch to boost her resume to 8-5-1-1 in her young career. Zero Tolerance ($2.10) was second and Pace Baby Pace (Matt Kakaley, $6) was third. Warrawee Ubeaut is owned by Burke Racing Stable, Phillip Collura, J&T Silva Stables, Purnell & Libby and Weaver Bruscemi. The final time was 1:51.3. Woodside Charm (Verlin Yoder) remains a perfect five-for-five after a facile victory in her $236,000 division of the Kentuckiana Stallion Management Stakes in 1:55. Leaving from post position eight, Yoder, who also steered the filly, placed her immediately on the lead. From that juncture, it was clearly obvious the world champion daughter of Chapter Seven-Fireworks Hanover was the one to beat as she lead the field of nine around the Anderson oval with fractions of :27, :58.1 and 1:27.3. Owned by her trainer-driver, Woodside Charm paid $2.40. Special Honor (Andy Miller, $7) came home second, with Starita (David Miller, $2.20) in third. Always A Prince powerful in Jenna's Beach Boy After favorite Jimmy Freight (Louis-Philippe Roy) threw down a sizzling :25.2 first quarter-mile, it left the door wide open for any of his five rivals to spring the upset and track record holder Always A Prince (Trace Tetrick) was the one who proved up to the task in this $155,000 event. Sitting in third for until entering the homestretch, Always A Prince moved powerfully on the outside to reach the wire ahead of Shnitzledosomethin (David Miller) and a valiant Jimmy Freight in 1:48.4, which was the same final time Lazarus N recorded in his win later on the card. Owned by Carl and Melanie Atley, Always a Prince paid $3.80 as the public's second choice while Schnitzeldosomethin provided $8 to those who supported him at the windows. Jimmy Freight paid $2.10. Live racing will continue at Hoosier Park Racing & Casino on Saturday, September 23 with an 11-race card. With a daily post time of 6:30 pm, live racing at Hoosier Park Racing & Casino will follow a Tuesday through Saturday schedule and be conducted through November 10. For more information on the upcoming entertainment and live racing schedule, please visit www.hoosierpark.com. Kim French, for Hoosier Park Racing & Casino  

  East Rutherford, NJ - Breakfast With The Babies at The Meadowlands took place under overcast skies with a slight tailwind in the homestretch and the temperature in the low 70's.   The presence of the great Moni Maker was felt in the morning's first race when Grandma's Moni swept by her competition in the stretch, finishing the 2:00.2 mile with a 27.1 final quarter. Grandma's Moni is by Donato Hanover out of All Our Moni, a daughter of Moni Maker.   Tim Tetrick held the filly in third before fanning her off cover in the stretch and she sailed by the early leader Can't I (John Campbell) who was a game second after cutting the mile. Grandma's Moni was retained by her breeders, the Moni Maker Stable and is trained by Frank Antonacci. She looks special.   The pacing colt Lindythefourteenth made it a very good day for trainer Frank Antonacci, winning in 1:55 / 27.4 from just off the pace for Scott Zeron. The Lindy Farms Somebeachsomewhere homebred from Antoinette Hanover was racing at his third venue in three career starts, all wins. Rock The Boat (Andy Miller) was second and Long Beach (first foal of American Jewel) was a closing third for Tetrick.   True Friends was a 2:01.2 winner in her first outing for Dave Miller and trainer Nifty Norman. Miller sat behind leader Ethanol as the field trotted by three-quarters in 1:32.2, inherited the lead when that one went off stride then held sway through the stretch. Blacksirenpedia (Campbell) rallied late to be a good second and Casaubon (Tetrick) survived a first over bid to be third. The winner was a $70,000 buy at the Harrisburg sale for Mel Hartman, Nifty's Enzed Racing Stable and RAW Equine.   Trainer Kevin McDermott's Donato Hanover x Emmamazing filly Envy Hanover was the race three winner. Yannick Gingras sent Envy Hanover out to the early lead, yielded to Campbell and Allbassnotreble through easy middle fractions then went by under mild urging through the 28.3 end to the 2:01.3 mile. Allbassnotreble held grimly for second and Amber Ella (Tetrick) flashed good late foot to get third. Jeff Gural's Little E LLC is the owner of the $50,000 Harrisburg purchase.   Trotting colts came around with race four where Beach Credit impressed with a 1:59 win for Dave Miller. Being the last to the lead after several early changes, Beach Credit tacked a 29.1 final panel onto the mile with something in reserve. Wutan (Gingras) was second best from the pocket and Break Free made a late gain to be third. Arden Homestead Stable and trainer Janice Connor paid $45,000 for the Credit Winner colt in Lexington.   Oddball and Kabang (Scott Zeron) traded blows through the stretch of race five with Oddball (Andover Hall x Little Rigs) prevailing in 200.1 / 28.3 for trainer-driver Jimmy Takter. John Fielding owns the winner, a $25,000 Lexington sale yearling.   Takter colts were one-two in the sixth with Sir John F (Brett Miller) getting up over the Italian bred Ready Cash colt Victor Deo IT (Gingras) in the shadow of the wire to win in 1:59.1 / 28.3. Put in play early from the outside, Sir John F sat a pocket as Golden Kronos led until the stretch then split rivals for the win. Victor Deo was a very good second while Golden Kronos held third. John & Jim Fielding, Herb Holland and Kevin Mc Kinlay own the winner, a $45,000 buy in Lexington last fall.   Tony Alagna fillies were one-two in the first pacing filly race with Ann Hill (Campbell) emerging from the pocket to track down stable-mate Everyone's Watching (Zeron) in the last strides of a 27.3 end to the 1:55.3 mile. The winner is a Tom Hill homebred Roll With Joe from Taxi Fare Hanover.   Jimmy Marohn, Jr picked up the drive on Caviart Malin for Nifty Norman and got her home, closing into the 27.3 final quarter of a mile in 1:55.4 mile. Let's Have A Party (Tetrick) and Beautiful Hill (Campbell) were across the track for second and third. The winner is a Well Said filly from Pretty Major owned by Caviart Farms who paid $20,000 for her at Harrisburg.     The Stohler Stable homebred Captain Velocity won today for driver Tim Tetrick, cutting the mile and drawing away powerfully in the 27 flat final quarter of his 1:55 mile. Incidentally, he becomes the twelfth 155 credit already this season for his sire Somebeachsomewhere, information (as well as bagels) courtesy of Murray Brown.   Tony Alagna trains Captain Velocity and it's entirely possible that Trent Stohler placed him with Tony when they broke camp at Sunshine Meadows due to the similarities this colt shares in both name and appearance (and perhaps talent) with Tony's champion Captaintreacherous. Deo De Janiero (Joe Bongiorno) was second and American Dreamer (Campbell) a drifting third.   Live racing tonight at The Meadowlands includes an elimination for next week's Meadowlands Pace and the $250,000 Graduate finals with Freaky Feet Pete and Wiggle It Jiggleit slated to square off in the featured tenth race.   From the Meadowlands Media Department

WASHINGTON, PA, Aug. 20, 2015 -- When Mission Brief demolished a field of 3-year-old fillies in Friday's $174,000 Moni Maker at The Meadows, it reinforced the notion gaining momentum across harness racing--when she's healthy and competing against fillies, the only horse that can beat Mission Brief is Mission Brief. Fresh off her second-place finish to Pinkman in the Hambletonian, Mission Brief waltzed to victory--winning driver Yannick Gingras never cut her loose--in 1:52.3 for trainer Ron Burke and owners Burke Racing Stable, Our Horse Cents Stables, J&T Silva Stables and Weaver Bruscemi LLC. I'm So Fancy finished second, 3-1/4 lengths back, while Gatka Hanover earned show, giving trainer Burke a 1-2-3 sweep. Hambletonian Oaks winner Wild Honey, the only filly in the field given a shot to challenge Mission Brief, stalked the winner from the pocket but broke stride in the stretch, finishing fourth-placed-sixth. From the gate, Gingras idled outside with Mission Brief, waiting for the dust to settle before pushing her to the front. "I thought the only way to get beat is to do something stupid," Gingras said. "Even if someone decided to go on, I thought I could trot by them. So I wanted to give her a chance to get her feet under her and go from there. She's faster, bigger, and stronger. She doesn't look like a filly; she looks like a colt." The daughter of Muscle Hill-Southwind Serena, who extended her career bankroll to $1,153,417, recorded even fractions of 28/56.1/1:24.1/1:52.3 in winning for the 14th time in 20 career outings. Burke, harness racing's perennial leading conditioner, showed no hesitation in calling Mission Brief "a special horse, the best horse I've ever trained." "There's no part of me that wavers on that--she's the best horse I've ever trained," he said. Prior to the race, Burke indicated he likely would keep Mission Brief in against fillies for the balance of the season, but what he saw in the Moni Maker has him considering other options. "I would like to maybe try it (racing against males)," he said, "but it won't be an easy sell to everybody else in our group. I'm a little bit gamer--maybe I believe more in her than anybody does. For a while, it's a decision we don't have to make." Burke said Mission Brief's next race will be the Peaceful Way at Mohawk, with a lot of "green" time for the filly between now and then as well as continuing medical treatments for her back. "We'll keep after that, but I don't think it's a chronic condition," he said. "It was something that came on. She got out of kilter like anybody else and had to work her way through it. When she warmed up tonight, she was as sound as she's been all year." The Meadows Racetrack & Casino

WASHINGTON, PA, Aug. 20, 2015 -- When Mission Brief finished second in the Hambletonian and Wild Honey took the Hambletonian Oaks, they solidified their credentials as harness racing's top 3-year-old filly trotters. However, the two didn't face each other on Hambletonian Day. They'll take care of that little omission Friday at The Meadows Racetrack & Casino when they clash in the $174,000 Moni Maker. The event goes as race 3, with first post at 6:55 PM. Mission Brief long had been considered a candidate to take on males in the Hambletonian, but back problems put those plans on hold for a while. She responded well to medical treatment and turned in a memorable Hambletonian performance, losing to Pinkman by 3/4 lengths. Ron Burke, who trains the daughter of Muscle Hill-Southwind Serena for Burke Racing Stable, Our Horse Cents Stables, J&T Silva Stables and Weaver Bruscemi LLC, said Mission Brief had treatment for her back and went two strong training trips in New Jersey before her mid-week ship to The Meadows. Although Burke is based here, Mission Brief has followed the Grand Circuit throughout her career and will be making her first lifetime start at The Meadows, perhaps erasing some of the home-track advantage. "I trained her here for about a month earlier in the year, so I know she gets around this track well," Burke said. "She's very comfortable here." He said he'll likely continue to race Mission Brief, whose Hambletonian check made her a millionaire, against fillies but that he'll play that by ear. "It would be a hard push for me to get everyone on board to do it (race against males) again, but I wouldn't rule it out," he said. Wild Honey, the 2014 Pennsylvania Sires Stakes champion who has won several times at The Meadows, has been a model of speed and consistency, winning 13 of 19 lifetime starts and $838,488. Trainer Jimmy Takter said he expects more of the same from the daughter of Cantab Hall-U Wanna Lindy. "I think we'll give Mission Brief a run for the money," Takter said. "You cannot beat that filly (Mission Brief) on the bigger tracks, so it depends how she gets over The Meadows' surface." In addition to the battle between Mission Brief and Wild Honey, the Moni Maker is yet another round in the long-running Burke versus Takter series; only one of the six fillies in the field, Mickey Peterson's Sistas, is conditioned by someone other than Burke or Takter, arguably the two most successful in the sport in recent years. The Moni Maker also features round two of Gingras versus Gingras, as Yannick Gingras, regular driver of Mission Brief and frequent driver of Wild Honey, was forced to choose between them, just as he had to pick between Mission Brief and Pinkman for the Hambletonian. For the Moni Maker, he's sticking with Mission Brief. "It's a great problem to have," Gingras said. "I picked Mission Brief over Jimmy's best colt, so this wasn't a tough call, even though it stinks because I love Wild Honey. She's a sweetheart. I think I only lost once with her. Obviously, Mission Brief is special." Mission Brief and Gingras will leave from post 4 while Wild Honey and Dave Palone go from post 3. The complete Moni Maker field, in post position order with drivers, trainers and morning line odds: 1. Sistas, Eric Goodell, Mickey Peterson, 3-1 2. I'm So Fancy, Tony Hall, Ron Burke, 10-1 3. Wild Honey, Dave Palone, Jimmy Takter, 5-2 4. Mission Brief, Yannick Gingras, Ron Burke, 8-5 5. Smexi, Dan Rawlings, Jimmy Takter, 5-1 6. Gatka Hanover, Mike Wilder, Ron Burke, 12-1 The Meadows Racetrack & Casino

Dublin, Ireland – You could call it the “Little Brown Jug” of Ireland and most everyone at the track would know what you were talking about. There were horsemen, women and children from Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales and they all have great passion for harness racing. Portmarnock Trotting Track is just fifteen minutes from the center of Dublin. The passenger train runs past the backstretch every 20 minutes or so, day and night. We started off the afternoon with a meet and greet featuring Hall of Famers Wally Hennessey (USA/Canada), Roger Huston (USA) Anthony Butt (New Zealand) Heather Vitale and myself. The tented area immediately became packed with nearly 200 race fans both young and old in attendance. After the introductions were made Roger Huston took charge and told some great stories that got the crowd in motion and questions to the guest started to fly. People wanted to know why they still used the Australian jog-cart styled long shafted race bikes down under instead of the American version. Fans wanted to know what it was like for Wally Hennessey to drive Moni Maker all over the racing world and which Roger Huston’s favorite Little Brown Jug races was. Then there was a great live auction with the proceeds going to the Pieta House that is country-wide suicide prevention organization with 15 locations throughout Ireland. I was most proud that horsemen from the USA and Canada donated great items, driving colors autographed from Tim Tetrick, Corey Callahan, George Brennan, David Miller, Jody Jamieson and, of course, Wally Hennessey. Anthony Butt brought over a set of his colors and a special Inter dominion jacket were all bid for feverishly. Bobble heads too (Roger Huston, Jody Jamieson and Corey Callahan) and the Meadowlands sent over Hambletonian caps from last week’s race. The biggest item of all was a used UFO race bike used by Foiled Again from the Ron Burke Stable and that alone brought 3,000 euros ($4,000 US). The auction continues Sunday but I overheard that proceeds just for Saturday may have tipped the scales at over 6,000 euros and could surpass 10,000 after Sunday. Then the racing began and the crowds piled in more and more despite on and off rain showers throughout the day. Portmarnock is not that big a track. The infield is used during the day as a golf driving range so racing did not start until 5 pm. Up until 4 pm a tractor was in the centerfield scooping up golf balls. They race four on the gate and four trailers. Roger Huston called the races from the infield on the second floor of glass trailers. He was sitting on a swivel chair so he could swing around the see horses at the raced down the backstretch. But despite the rain the fans came out, maybe 1,000 strong for the races. And what I found to be the most interesting was the wagering on the races. There are no betting windows and pari-mutuel machines, no self-service bill accepting units. They have actual live bookies. Men taking bets, writing down first names and handing back a business card type voucher, shouting out the odds and parlays, checking their competition and if they were willing, raising their odds a fraction to entice others to come wager with them. A fistful of cash in hand to make quick change before the field lined up behind the starting gate. Some bookies had an LCD board and could change odds in a split second typing away on their keyboard. Others had dry erase boards that would smear in the rain so they had to wipe them with their sleeves in order to post the new odds. Some were dressed in nice suits with loud ties, one had a top hat. It just made the races more interesting than I had seen before. It was wagering at its grass roots. Legalized bookies encourage punters to come forward and try their luck. And everyone loved Roger Huston’s race calls. He had them cheering for the field at the half mile and the finish of each race. And the fans applauded the winners and losers after every event. And then once the races were over, the party did not stop. The bar at the track was packed from the start of the first race and was still going strong when I left to come back to the hotel at near midnight. Everyone was having a great time. I just hope some of them remembered to get a little rest because everyone was looking forward to the Sunday card and hoping for Mother Nature to provide them with a sunny, dry afternoon, especially for the final of the Ladbroke’s Vincent Delaney Memorial Pace Final. We started out Day 2 in Dublin, Ireland sorta on the wrong foot, perhaps even the wrong side of the bed. As some of us (me) overslept because of our 36-hour first day, I missed the trip to the Guiness Factory, so Stephanie (my wife) and I talked with the lobby desk people and they turned us on to a pleasant surprise. The Village of Malahide. We took a taxi and within 20 minutes was at the entrance to the Malahide Castle and its lavish 1,000 acres grounds. We walked up what seemed to be a half mile tree-laden drive, stopped to watch youngsters playing cricket, just like kids in America playing organized baseball, on the beautifully manicured lawns of the palatial estate. Then we reached the castle and its stunning four-acre walled gardens, all first built in the 12th century. The Talbot Family owned and lived there for almost 800 years. The castle is full furnished and magnificent. We then took a quick walking tour into the Malahide Village with its picturesque streets decorated with flower displays, lovely store fronts and boat marina. Then back to the hotel and to get ready for the harness racing at Portmarnock. By Steve Wolf, for Harnesslink.com

Arch Madness wasn't ill, but a victory in a conditioned handicap at Harrah's Philadelphia last week might have been just what the doctor ordered. Now the 10-year-old gelding is returning to competition against the continent's best older trotters as he heads to Saturday's eliminations for the John Cashman Jr. Memorial at the Meadowlands. The Cashman, formerly known as the Nat Ray, attracted 15 horses. The top five from two $50,000 eliminations will advance to the $300,650 final on Aug. 2, Hambletonian Day, at the Big M. Among the entrants are world champion Sebastian K, Maple Leaf Trot winner Intimidate, two-time Dan Patch Award-winner Market Share, and 2013 Hambletonian champion Royalty For Life. Saturday's card at the Meadowlands also includes a $35,000 Hambletonian Oaks prep for 3-year-old female trotters and $40,000 single elimination for the Lady Liberty for older female pacers. Nine of the 11 fillies entered in the $500,000 Hambletonian Oaks, which is Aug. 2, will compete in Saturday's prep. Ten mares are in the Lady Liberty elimination, with Rocklamation receiving a bye to next week's final. Arch Madness, who skipped the Maple Leaf Trot at Mohawk Racetrack in Ontario, enters his Cashman elim with one win in eight starts this season. Lifetime, he has won 35 of 115 races and earned $4.22 million, good for sixth place among all trotters in history and second to only Moni Maker among trotters that raced the majority of their careers in North America. "It's always nice to get an easy win in a horse," Trond Smedshammer said about Arch Madness' three-length victory in 1:52.2 at Harrah's Philadelphia on July 16. "That's the best medicine for a horse, winning. I was very happy about that decision [not to go to the Maple Leaf Trot]. It worked out good. "You can't ask him to go everywhere; he's 10 years old. Canada was an easy decision to leave out." Arch Madness (a son of Balanced Image-Armbro Archer) was winless in two races at age 2, but won at least one race worth more than $170,000 in six of the next seven years. His top triumphs came in the 2007 Breeders Crown for 3-year-olds, 2008 Maple Leaf Trot, 2011 Oslo Grand Prix, 2010 Cutler Memorial, 2009 Credit Winner, and 2013 Allerage Open Trot. He finished second in the Elitlopp in 2012 and 2013. He also finished second twice in the Breeders Crown Open, in 2008 and 2009, and twice in the Maple Leaf Trot, in 2009 and 2011. "Arch is pretty much the same as he's been previous years," said Smedshammer, who trains the horse for owners Marc Goldberg and Willow Pond LLC. "It doesn't seem like he's lost much, it's just the competition is tougher. It's been brutally tough, especially [Sebastian K]. "I haven't been too worried about it because later in the year when the others seem to be getting tired, he usually gets better," Smedshammer added. Arch Madness will start from post seven in the second of the two Cashman eliminations. To his inside from the rail are Mister Herbie, Wishing Stone, Sweet Justice, Uncle Peter, Sebastian K, and Appomattox. To his outside is Creatine. The first division, from post one, is Market Share, Your So Vain, Spider Blue Chip, Intimidate, Sevruga, Archangel, and Royalty For Life. It is an accomplished group, with Sebastian K being history's fastest trotter and 10 of the remaining horses having won at least one Breeders Crown, Maple Leaf Trot, or Trotting Triple Crown race. They have five Breeders Crown trophies (Uncle Peter, Arch Madness, Intimidate, Spider Blue Chip, and Market Share), four Maple Leaf Trot titles (Arch Madness, Mister Herbie, Market Share, and Intimidate), two Hambletonian triumphs (Market Share and Royalty For Life), two Kentucky Futurity wins (Wishing Stone and Creatine) and one Yonkers Trot (Archangel). by Ken Weingartner, for Harness Racing Communications  

The author of Standardbred Old Friends, a coffee table book featuring the work of renowned equine photographer Barbara Livingston, will sell and sign copies of the book on Governor's Day at the Delaware State Fair in Harrington, Delaware, on Thursday, July 24. The 216 page book features 150 photos and author Ellen Harvey's stories of 43 horses of great achievement, long gone from the spotlight, but still cherished and well cared for in the twilight of their lives. For a video about the making of the book, click here. The signing will benefit Horse Lovers United (HLU), a Delmarva group that places Standardbreds and other horses in to second careers and adoptive homes after their racing days are over. HLU placed one of the horses featured in the book, Dust Devil, who is now 24 years old and living on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Harvey will be signing at the M & T Grandstand from 3 p.m. to the close of racing that evening; the book is $30, with a portion of proceeds going to help HLU care for and place horses in need of homes. To learn more about Standardbred Old Friends, which features high profile horses like Mack Lobell, Cam's Card Shark, Winky's Gill, Staying Together, Western Dreamer and the late Moni Maker, Matt's Scooter and Giant Victory, "like" Standardbred Old Friends Book on Facebook. For more information on Horses Lovers United, go to www.horseloversunited.com. by Ken Weingartner, for Harness Racing Communications  

It’s beginning to look like Ake Svanstedt’s trotter Sebastian is so superior to the competition that he’s racing only against the clock. There was a time when time was privileged over purse money in the pursuit of assessing a stallion or mare’s suitability for the breeding ranks, but those days are long gone. Bob Marks never had much use for them, although he says he did “use them occasionally to get marks on horses that could never accomplish much in actual races.” Flip through the latest edition of the Breeder’s Book and you’ll find a couple of pacers with time trial marks—Jereme’s Jet and 26-year-old Cambest—and the Indiana stallion Jailhouse Jesse on the diagonal side. How sweet it would be to see Sebastian take to the track during the Red Mile meet with a pair of t-breds or pacers behind him and a jacked-up crowd cheering him home. He’d surely rid us of the 1:50 burden as well as Enough Said and his Colonial Downs asterisk. Fifty years ago just about every premium stallion and mare was measured against the clock at some point. Rodney, Fancy Crown, Most Happy Fella, Scotland, Yankee Lass, Bullet Hanover, Bye Bye Byrd, Dancer Hanover, Cheer Honey, Dayan, Hickory Pride, Elma, Isle Of Wight, Steady Beau and Sampson Direct all carry time trial marks. Some drivers specialized in handling the time trialing horses, while others were good with the prompters. When Adios Butler knocked two ticks off Billy Direct’s 22-year-old mark, which was set the day before Greyhound’s at The Red Mile on October 4, 1960, owner Paige West drove the 4-year-old while Del Miller and trainer/driver Eddie Cobb drove the t-bred prompters. When the 4-year-old Cash Hall went after Pine Chip’s 1:54 world record at Delaware in 2006, John Campbell drove the son of Self Possessed while Dave Palone chased after him with the Real Artist mare, Valentine. Cash Hall annihilated the mark with a 1:51.1 mile. On the trotting side, Greyhound’s TT1:55 ¼ mark, set on September 29, 1938 for Sep Palin, held fast for 31 years, until Nevele Pride dropped it to TT1:54.4 for Stanley Dancer at Indianapolis on Sunday August 31, 1969. Twelve thousand enthusiastic fans were in attendance that day. Coincidentally enough, a longstanding pacing mark of 1:55 was also set at that same Lexington meet in 1938: Billy Direct time trialed free-legged in 1:55 for Vic Fleming on September 28, 1938. That mark remained untouched during the 1940s. Frank Ervin put a 1:57.1 mark on 5-year-old Adios in a time trial when he was offered $500 to break the track record, and four years later another great progenitor, Gene Abbe, time trialed in 2:00.3, also at age five. But it took a race mark of 1:55 from Adios Harry in the American Pacing Derby at Vernon Downs on July 16, 1955, with the owner’s son Luther Lyons in the bike, to match Billy Direct’s mark. Adios Butler undercut the 1:55 standard five years later in the time trial referenced above. That 1:55 barrier was finally shattered. The great Speedy Crown didn’t break any records when he time trialed in 2:01.2 as a freshman in 1970, but after winning just four of eight starts and earning a paltry $2,000, he did prove that good things were on the way. Actually the first significant time trial for trotters in the 1970s came from Arnie Almahurst, a crazy fast son of Speedy Scot, who pretty much won every start he didn’t break stride in. He had little in common with his paternal brother, Speedy Crown, who never broke stride—not ever. Arnie time trialed in 1:57.2 at The Red Mile for Joe O’Brien and became the sixth fastest trotter behind Super Bowl, Nevele Pride, Ayres, Speedy Scot and Speedy Crown. Nine years later his 3-year-old son Arndon trotted the fastest mile ever by a trotter when he hit the wire in TT1:54 for Del Miller at The Red Mile. And twelve years after that Arndon’s 4-year-old son Pine Chip became the world record holder when he time trialed in 1:51 for John Campbell at Lexington. Arndon and his dad both retired as the fastest ever. Another important trotting time trial in the ‘70s was ABC Freight’s TT1:57.1 as a 2-year-old for Joe O’Brien at Hollywood Park in 1976. The sire of Garland Lobell topped Nevele Pride’s 1:58.2 freshman mark and became the fastest 2-year-old trotter ever. ABC set his lifetime mark of 1:56.3 the following year in a time trial. The market for blockbuster trotting time trials pretty much dried up after that, although Cash Hall did crush the half-mile mark with that 1:51.1 mile for John Campbell at Delaware in 2006 that was referenced above. The time trials involving Standardbred trotters under saddle has been less prevalent, nonetheless, it has played a prominent role due to the horses and people involved. In 1940 Greyhound ended his racing career under saddle at Lexington. Frances Dodge rode him to a world record of 2:01 ¾. That mark stood for 54-years, until Preferential and Brooke Nickells broke it in 1994 with a 1:58.2 mile. And six years later the mighty Moni Maker, like Greyhound, ended her career under saddle at The Red Mile. Jockey Julie Krone, with Jimmy Takter and Wally Hennessey following with prompters, trotted in an incredible 1:54.1. In the pacing camp it was up to Bret Hanover to continue the assault on the longstanding 1:55 standard that his paternal brother, Adios Butler, had begun. In early September of 1966, 4-year-old Bret, who was within a few months of being retired, time trialed in 1:54 at Vernon Downs for Frank Ervin with a single prompter chasing him. Five weeks later in Lexington Ervin put the TT1:53.3 mark on the big guy that would serve as his lifetime mark. Dancer preferred to put race marks on Albatross so there are no flashy time trials on Super Bird’s resume. He did become the fastest ever in a race when he won both heats of the Tattersalls Pace at The Red Mile in 1:54.4, topping Adios Harry’s race mark, which Bret had matched. He also won in 1:55.3 at Delaware, matching Adios Butler’s time trial mark and eclipsing Bret’s 1:57 half-mile track race mark. Steady Star, a free-legged son of Steady Beau,  who was a year older than Albatross, cornered the time trial market in that era. At three he circled The Red Mile in 1:54 for Joe O’Brien and the following year, on October 1, 1971, he time trialed in a head turning 1:52. Later on, in 1976, 4-year-old Nero time trialed in 1:55.1 and the following year Warm Breeze was race timed in 1:53.1 at Golden Bear in Sacramento. Two years later Meadow Skipper’s son Falcon Almahurst became the fastest 3-year-old pacer ever with a 1:52.2 time trial at Lexington for Bill Haughton. Only Steady Star had gone faster. Then came the game changer: 3-year-old Niatross’s TT1:49.1 at The Red Mile on Oct 1, 1980. It was the sport’s first sub-1:50 mile and, while it parallels Adios Butler’s breach of the 1:50 point, it was so much more. The closest thing to it was Steady Star going 1:52, but the sleek son of Steady Beau didn’t win a single open stakes race during his career—not so for Niatross. His son Nihilator was later positioned to outdo dad in a time trial at Springfield but the weather didn’t cooperate and he was unable to lower his 1:49.3 race mark in a time trial at DuQuoin.  Matt’s Scooter went after the 1:49.1 mark at The Red Mile in 1988 and knocked four ticks off of it. His 1:48.2 time trial for Mike Lachance established a new world record. Matt’s Scooter beat Niatross’s mark but 5-year-old Cambest blew it out of the water with his 1:46.1 time trial at Springfield. The problem was that he wasn’t tested afterwards and not long after that his 1:52.1 win in the Senior Jug was disqualified due to elevated bicarbonate levels. Cambest was slated to stand at Hanover Shoe Farms but in light of the controversial final chapter of his career they passed. So stick Jimmy Takter and Bernie Noren behind a couple of fast pacers and let’s see if Ake can wheel Sebastian around The Red Mile in a time that will cause the crowd to gasp the way they did for Steady Star’s 1:52 mile and Niatross’s 1:49.1. Speed has always sold in this game; time to pump it up via the time trial. by Joe FitzGerald, for http://viewfromthegrandstand.blogspot.com/

Campbellville, ON --- Last weekend’s elimination winners McWicked, Tellitlikeitis and Lyonssomewhere head an extremely competitive field of 10 for the $1 million Pepsi North America Cup harness race, this Saturday at Mohawk Racetrack. The 31st edition of the world’s richest pacing event, showcasing the finest 3-year-olds on the continent, will go postward at 10:14 p.m. and will be shown live on TSN. A half-hour preview of the race will air on TSN GO from 9:30-10:00 p.m., with the race set for TSN from 9:30 p.m.–10:30 p.m. The winner will earn C$500,000. Post positions were drawn today at Mohawk, with Toronto Maple Leafs forward Dave Bolland as the guest drawmaster. Last Saturday, three Cup eliminations were held to determine the field for the final. The three winners earned their connections the right to choose a post position before the balance of the field was drawn. Seventeen of the past 30 Cup winners also won their elimination. Trainer Casie Coleman, who won the 2010 Cup with Sportswriter, sends out McWicked, who recorded the fastest elim, winning by two lengths in 1:48.3, from post two. Owned by SSG Stables, McWicked, a son of 2002 Cup third place finisher Mcardle, is a five time winner in 14 outings with career earnings of $244,707. Driver David Miller has yet to win the Cup in 13 tries, but has twice been second, including last year with a 96-1 shot Twilight Bonfire. Trainer Jimmy Takter, more renowned as a trotting conditioner for such stars as Moni Maker, Kadabra and Malabar Man, but who also directed filly pacer See You At Peelers to championship seasons, will have two Cup entrants, Tellitlikeitis (post three) and Lyonssomewhere (post four), who both won their elims in ultra-impressive fashion and who both will be solidly backed on Saturday night. Tellitlikeitis, bred and owned by Lothlorien of Cheltenham, Ontario, took his elim in a career best 1:48.4, blowing by heavily-favored He's Watching to win by 2-1/4 lengths in only his second start of the year. The regally bred son of 2009 Cup winner Well Said out of champion Kikikatie also won his season opener, a Pennsylvania Sires Stake, at Pocono Downs in May. Lothlorien has shared ownership of three previous Cup winners -- Well Said (2009), Rocknroll Hanover (2005) and Red River Hanover (2002). Takter has only started two previous Cup entrants, both in 2012, and finished second with Time To Roll. Driver Brett Miller has two previous Cup drives, finishing second in 2010 with We Will See. Lyonssomewhere, owned by Geoffrey Lyons Mound of Burford, Ontario is undefeated in five starts. The son of 2008 Cup winner and Horse of the Year Somebeachsomewhere took his elim comfortably in 1:50.1 by 1-3/4 lengths in his first stakes appearance. He’ll be driven by Corey Callahan, making only his second Cup drive after finishing fourth with Mr Wiggles in 2009. He's Watching (post seven), co-owned and trained by David Menary of Rockton, Ontario, finished second to Tellitlikeitis in his elim, but last year won all eight starts en route to a Dan Patch Award as the United States’ top 2-year-old colt pacer. Winner of a Somebeachsomewhere division on May 31 in a career best 1:49.3, the son of American Ideal will be driven by the continent’s perennial leader, Tim Tetrick, who steered champion Captaintreacherous to an authoritative score in last year’s Cup. JK Endofanera (post nine), trained by Ron Burke for owner-breeder 3 Brothers Stables of New York City, had a five-race win streak broken in his elim when finishing third as the 1-2 choice to Lyonssomewhere, while drifting out in the stretch. The son of Art Major is the field’s leading money winner with $453,517, topped by his win last year in the Governor’s Cup at the Meadowlands. He’ll be driven by Brian Sears, who steered Rocknroll Hanover to victory in the 2005 Cup. Last year’s Breeders Crown champion, Luck Be Withyou (post eight), was third to Tellitlikeitis in his elim, after finishing second to JK Endofanera in a Somebeachsomewhere division the week before in his seasonal debut. Trained by Bill Cass for owner John Craig of North York, the son of Western Ideal will be driven by Ron Pierce, who has won two Cups, with Total Truth in 2006 and Well Said in 2009. Let's Drink On It (post five), trained by Joe Seekman, is a seven-time winner in 16 starts and was third to McWicked in his elim. A son of Art Official, the only horse to defeat Somebeachsomewhere, he’ll be piloted by 21-year-old Tyler Smith, who would become the youngest driver to win the Pepsi North America Cup. Sometimes Said (post 10), another son of 2009 Cup winner Well Said, finished second to McWicked last Saturday, the ninth time in 14 outings he’s been the runner-up. Trained by Jim Campbell for owner Fashion Farms and driven by his Hall of Fame brother and record six-time Cup winner John Campbell, Sometimes Said was also second to Luck Be Withyou in last year’s Breeders Crown. Beat The Drum (post one), a son of 2007 Cup winner Tell All, finished second as a 27-1 shot to Lyonssomewhere in his elim for trainer Staffan Lind. Yannick Gingras drives the three-time winner in 17 starts, the most outings by any Cup entrant this year. Completing the field is Ideal Cowboy (post six), who finished fourth to McWicked in his elim but drew into the final. Trained by PJ Fraley, the son of American Ideal has banked $48,684 in 10 career starts. Scott Zeron will drive. In 2012, Thinking Out Loud set the stakes record of 1:47.4 at Mohawk, eclipsing the former mark of 1:48.1 established by Well Said in 2009 while Hall of Famer Bettor's Delight has won the race by the largest margin, 4-1/2 lengths, in 2001. Other winners of the Cup, which began in 1984 at Greenwood Raceway, include such champions as Jate Lobell (1987), Precious Bunny (1991), Presidential Ball (1993), Cam's Card Shark (1994), Gallo Blue Chip (2000), Rocknroll Hanover (2005), Somebeachsomewhere (2008) and Captaintreacherous (2013). The Cup was raced at Greenwood from 1984-93, followed by Woodbine from 1994-2006. It was held at Mohawk Racetrack for the first time in 2007. The shortest-priced winners, at $2.70, are Jate Lobell and Presidential Ball, while Goalie Jeff, in 1989, provided the highest win payoff, $93.60. Horseplayers will get an added bonus on Pepsi North America Cup night when Mohawk will offer three Pick-4 wagers including an “All Stakes Pick-4.” The All Stakes Pick-4, with a $100,000 guaranteed pool, will run from race seven to 10 and will feature the Roses Are Red, Mohawk Gold Cup, Fan Hanover and conclude in race 10 with the 31st Pepsi North America Cup. $1 million Pepsi North America Cup Post–Horse–Driver-Trainer-Line 1–Beat The Drum–Yannick Gingras-Staffan Lind-20-1 2–McWicked–David Miller-Casie Coleman-7-2 3–Tellitlikeitis–Brett Miller-Jimmy Takter-3-1 4–Lyonssomewhere–Corey Callahan-Jimmy Takter-4-1 5–Let's Drink On It–Tyler Smith-Joe Seekman-6-1 6–Ideal Cowboy–Scott Zeron-PJ Fraley-15-1 7–He's Watching–Tim Tetrick-David Menary-5-1 8–Luck Be Withyou–Ron Pierce-William Cass-12-1 9–JK Endofanera–Brian Sears-Ron Burke-10-1 10–Sometimes Said–John Campbell-Jim Campbell-20-1 AE–Jet Airway–Scott Zeron-Erv Miller From the Publicity Department at WEG

Columbus, OH --- Racing fans looking to cheer on USA representatives Maven and Uncle Peter in Sweden’s Elitlopp on Sunday morning, May 25, can do so from home by accessing this link, Maharajah.se., to a Swedish site that is broadcasting the race live. There is a translate to English button on the site's home page. The Elitlopp can also be viewed and wagered on at The Meadowlands Racetrack, which will open its doors at 8:30 a.m. on Sunday for the simulcast from Sweden. Contested at Stockholm’s Solvalla Racecourse, The Elitlopp, is considered one of the most prestigious harness races in the world. Each year, 16 star equine athletes from around the globe are invited to Stockholm for the event. Two U.S. representatives got the invite for 2014. Top class U.S. trotters Maven, trained by Jonas Czernyson, and Uncle Peter of the Jimmy Takter Stable look to bring Elitlopp victory to the U.S. for the first time since the great Moni Maker’s win in 1998. Arch Madness gave strong performances in the Elitlopp in 2012 and 2013, but never won the race, finishing second both times. The first elimination race, featuring Maven and regular driver Yannick Gingras from post six will be contested at 8:55 a.m. (EDT). The second elimination, in which Uncle Peter will start from post three with David Miller, is slated for 9:22 a.m.  The top four horses from each race will then compete in the Elitlopp final, set to go off at 11:35 a.m. by Allison Conte, for the USTA

TORONTO, May 18 - After a perfect 17-for-17 campaign last season, the reigning Horse of the Year in both Canada and the U.S., Bee A Magician will make her first start of the season on Monday at Woodbine. The four-year-old daughter of Kadabra will contest in the first leg of the Miss Versatility series. Trained by Richard 'Nifty' Norman throughout her career, Bee A Magician has banked $2.3 million for owners David McDuffee, Herb Liverman and Mel Hartman. Among her accomplishments last season, the bay captured the Breeders Crown, Hambletonian Oaks, Moni Maker, Delvin Miller Memorial, Simcoe, American National and Elegantimage. Her career best time of 1:51 in last year's Delvin Miller at the Meadowlands is the fastest mile ever by a three-year-old filly trotter. In addition, Bee A Magician was named three-year-old trotting filly of the year in both Canada and the U.S. "I think she's better than she was last year," Norman said. "She had a great winter with two nice qualifiers and she's turned into a big strapping filly. By next year I think we'll even notice more of a difference." Bee A Magician, a three-time O'Brien Award winner, has two qualifiers under her belt at The Meadowlands, most recently with a winning effort in 1:55.3. Two divisions of the Miss Versatility series will take place in races three and nine. Bee A Magician will contest in the latter $30,000 contest from post two with driver Brian Sears. A field of seven will line up behind the gate and perhaps Bee A Magician's main rival is Perfect Alliance, who has remained undefeated this season from nine starts. "She's a really good horse and to be honest, I don't expect to beat her (Perfect Alliance)," Norman said. "She's on top of her game right now and we're just starting the season. As long as my filly is trotting strong at the wire, I'll be happy. She does always tend to surprise me though with a big effort. The Armbro Flight (June 14) is about a month away and we'll be peaking her for that." Monday evening will mark Bee A Magician's first start as a four-year-old racing against older mares for the first time in her career. "It's a quality field, there's no doubt," he said. "Maven is not in there, but other than her there are a lot of quality mares. Even some of the Canadian mares that we don't see a lot down in the U.S. look like they belong." The trotting miss has tasted defeat just three times in her career from 30 starts. She has remained undefeated since October 27, 2012. The fields will line up as follows: Race 3 1. Classic Martine 2. Charmed Life 3. Angies Lucky Star 4. Upfrontluckycarol 5. Rockin With Dewey 6. Coffeecake Hanover Race 9 1. Dorsay 2. Bee A Magician 3. Ma Chere Hall 4. Bax Of Life 5. Motown Muscle 6. Perfect Alliance 7. Frau Blucher by Greg Gangle, for WEG

Uncle Peter will prep for the Elitlopp, to be held May 25 in Sweden, by facing nine rivals in Sunday's Copenhagen Cup at Charlottenlund Travbane in Denmark. Trained by Jimmy Takter, Uncle Peter will be handled by his regular driver, David Miller, in the 1-1/4 mile race, which has a purse of $140,000 for the winner. Uncle Peter drew post No. 1. Defending Copenhagen Cup champion Mr Picolit will start from post three. The field also includes Kash's Cantab, Solvato, and Magic Tonight - all who began their careers in the U.S. and were stakes winners. Solvato, incidentally, was bred by a group headed by Takter's wife, Christina, and is a full brother to Takter's star filly Shake It Cerry. The 5-year-old Uncle Peter arrived overseas early Wednesday morning. He enters the Copenhagen Cup off a half-length win over Sevruga in 1:52.1 on May 2 at Meadowlands Racetrack. A week earlier, he was second in his seasonal debut, finishing 1-1/2 lengths behind Modern Family in 1:51.1. "Against those horses (in the Copenhagen Cup), I think he's pretty comparable," Takter said about Uncle Peter, who has won 13 of 37 career races and $1.18 million for owners Christina Takter, Brixton Medical AB, John and Jim Fielding, and Goran Falk. "It's probably a softer field than is going to be in the Elitlopp. There also is a big race Saturday in Finland, so some horses will be there." Uncle Peter is the only one of seven confirmed Elitlopp invitees competing in the Copenhagen Cup. Others expected in the Elitlopp, according to its website, are Maven, Pascia 'Lest, Panne de Moteur, Timoko, Reven d'Amour, and Shaq Is Back. The field for the Elitlopp will consist of 16 horses. Takter won the Elitlopp and Copenhagen Cup with Moni Maker in 1998. Moni Maker, a two-time Horse of the Year Award winner, died May 2 at the age of 21. "I haven't been back since Moni Maker won it," Takter said. "It would be exciting to go back and win the race after Moni Maker just passed away. "You've got to take a shot. If you're not in it, you can't win it." Takter was unconcerned about the extra distance in the Copenhagen Cup, but thought Uncle Peter's post could be a disadvantage. "The two horses outside of him (Kash's Cantab and Mr Picolit) are extremely quick; they can leave faster than anyone," Takter said. "You can get into a little trouble there." The style of racing is different in Europe, Takter said, so it was good Miller was going to get a few drives under his belt before the Elitlopp. "It's really tough racing over there," said Takter, a native of Sweden who has lived in the U.S. for more than three decades. "You're getting drivers from a bunch of different countries and the driving is way different from our style. You almost get shocked when you see some of those races. They're parking each other, it's tight, you don't get any position, they keep you out three wide. It's not easy. "It's good for David. He's going to drive Uncle Peter and we got another drive for him Sunday. He can get a little familiar to European driving. David is a professional. I'm sure he will study the races and watch (video) so he is familiar with the style of racing. There is a horse outside all the time over there. It's tactic driven." In addition to Uncle Peter in the Copenhagen Cup, Takter's 4-year-old male trotter Corky will race on the undercard. Corky won last year's Beal Memorial and has earned $897,465 for owners Christina Takter and John and Jim Fielding. "He's in a race for 4-year-olds, about $60,000 purse," Takter said. "I figure it's good for him to go over and not have to race against the (older) horses here. He can do three or four starts over there. If I'm going to send one horse over there, I might as well send two." Following is the field in post order for the Copenhagen Cup, with listed drivers: 1. Uncle Peter, David Miller; 2. Kash's Cantab, Erik Adielsson; 3. Mr Picolit, Jorma Kontio; 4. Orali, Jeppe Juel; 5. Solvato, Veijo Heiskanen; 6. Beckman, Franck Nivard; 7. Mosaique Face, Lutfi Kolgjini; 8. Harry Haythrow, Peter Untersteiner; 9. Magic Tonight, Orjan Kihlstrom; 10. Caballion, Bjorn Goop.

Holger Ehlert trained Nesta Effe returns to Vermo. Fineland on Saturday May 10 to defend last year's Finlandia AJO title. The Gr. I International UET Masters Series event will be contested over 1609 meters autostart for purse of 190,000 euros. Three career winners of over 1 million euros are in the lineup (Nesta Effe, Sanity and Univers de Pan).Ten quality performers will be at the start: Juliano Rags, Noralf Braekken, Norway Oasis Bi, Claes Svensson, Italy Nesta Effe, Roberto Vecchione, Italy Sanity, Johnny Takter, Sweden Quite An Avenger, Marrku Nieminen, Finland Univers de Pan, Philippe Daugeard, France Blue Porsche, Likka Nurmonen, USA Prussia, Pietro Gubellini, Italy Paladin Bleu, Joseph Verbeeck, France Air Gunner, Kari Rosimo, Finland Nesta Effe Replay of the 2013 event and post-race festivities are shown by link below: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KuZih-ToflI#t=362 The 2014 field at Helsinki shapes up as wide-open affair. Oasis Bi has 12 career wins in 35 starts for 3,263,264SEK. The six year-old son of Toss Out-Up Front JM-Self Possessed has posted two wins in four starts this year against solid foes. Sanity (8g Love You-Flash Light-Mack Lobell) has also started 2014 effectively with a 3-2-0 slate in five starts including success in France. He now has 30 wins from 69 appearances for earnings of 9,723,176SEK. Local player Air Gunner (6g Ray Gun-Dame Gallant-Meadow Gallant) has also begun the season well with three wins, the last two in 1.11.7kr for driver Kari Rosimo. Winners of the Finlandia include legends of the trotting wars internationally (e.g., Commander Crowe, SJ's Photo, Copiad, Davidia Hanover, Napoletano, Grade's Singing and Ideal du Gazeau). The race record 1.10.6kr was set in 2010 by Quarcio du Chene reined by Bjorn Goop. Winners of Finlandia-Ajo Year Horse Driver Trainer Winning horse's native country Winning time 2013 Nesta Effe Roberto Vecchione Holger Ehlert  Italy 1:10.9 2012 Sebastian K Björn Goop Björn Goop  Sweden 1:11.1 2011 Commander Crowe Jean-Michel Bazire Fabrice Souloy  Sweden 1:13.7 2010 Quarcio du Chene Björn Goop Björn Goop  France 1:10.6 2009 Igor Font Jean-Michel Bazire Fabrice Souloy  France 1:11.8 2008 Oiseau de Feux Jean-Michel Bazire Fabrice Souloy  France 1:11.3 2007 Opal Viking Jorma Kontio Nils Enqvist  Sweden 1:10.8 2006 Hot Shot Knick Thomas Uhrberg Kari Lähdekorpi  Sweden 1:11.5 2005 Kart de Baudrairie Jean-Michel Bazire Franck Leblanc  France 1:12.2 2004 Rotation Stig H. Johansson Stig H. Johansson  United States 1:12.5 2003 Kiwi Joseph Verbeeck Fabrice Souloy  France 1:12.0 2002 H.P. Paque Trond Smedshammer Trond Smedshammer  United States 1:11.7 2001 B.W.T. Magic Ahti Antti-Roiko Matti Salmi  Finland 1:11.2 2000 Giesolo de Lou Jean-Etienne Dubois Jean-Etienne Dubois  France 1:11.2 1999 Giesolo de Lou Pierre Vercruysse Jean-Etienne Dubois  France 1:11.6 1998 Dryade des Bois Joseph Verbeeck Jean-Baptiste Bossuet  France 1:12.5 1997 Zoogin Åke Svanstedt Åke Svanstedt  Sweden 1:12.1 1996 Isla J. Brave Aki Antti-Roiko Petri Klemola  Finland 1:12.5 1995 SJ's Photo David Wade David Wade  United States 1:13.3 1994 Copiad Erik Berglöf Erik Berglöf  Sweden 1:12.5 1993 Born Quick Tommy Hanné Tommy Hanné  Finland 1:12.1 1992 Otto-Mani Antti Teivainen Esa Aronen  Finland 1:13.7 1991 Atas Fighter L. Torbjörn Jansson Torbjörn Jansson  Sweden 1:13.5 1990 Florida Jewel William Fahy John Holloway  United States 1:13.3 1989 Napoletano Stig H. Johansson Stig Engberg  United States 1:12.9 1988 Napoletano Stig H. Johansson Stig Engberg  United States 1:14.1 1987 Grades Singing Olle Goop Olle Goop  United States 1:14.1 1986 Davidia Hanover Jorma Kontio Per Eriksson  United States 1:14.7 1985 Keystone Patton Jorma Kontio Antti Savolainen  United States 1:14.1 1984 Shane T. Hanover Per Henriksen Per Henriksen  United States 1:14.9 1983 Speedy Magnus Olle Goop Olle Goop  Sweden 1:13.2 1982 Dartster F. Olle Hedin Olle Hedin  Sweden 1:13.9 1981 Ideal du Gazeau Eugene Lefevre Eugene Lefevre  France 1:14.3 1980 Ejakval Jean-Claude David Jean-Claude David  France 1:15.6 by Thomas H. Hicks, for Harnesslink.com

European trotting fans will be treated this weekend (Sunday May 11) to Charlottenlund’s Broline Copenhagen Cup in Demark. This Gr. I International UET Masters Series test is a meaningful Elitloppet prep and contains contestants from Denmark, Sweden and the USA. Uncle Peter makes his initial European venture after arriving from USA today. Previous USA import Solvato has raced well lately as has Magic Tonight that will have Orjan Kihlstrom up for Roger Walmann. Start: Broline Copenhagen Cup (UET Trotting Masters Gr 1) 1.350.000 kroner ($227,000 US), 2011 meters auotstart 1) Uncle Peter (us) – David Miller – Jimmy Takter 2) Kash's Cantab (us) - Erik Adielsson – Stig H. Johansson 3) Mr Picolit (s) - Jorma Kontio – Raoul Engblom 4) Orali (dk) - Jeppe Juel – Jeppe Juel 5) Solvato (us) - Veijo Heiskanen – Veijo Heiskanen 6) Beckman (s) - Franck Nivard - Fabrice Souloy 7) Mosaique Face (s) - Lutfi Kolgjini – Lutfi Kolgjini 8) Harry Haythrow (s) - Peter Untersteiner – Johnny Johansson 9) Magic Tonight (us) - Örjan Kihlström – Roger Walmann 10) Caballion (s) - Björn Goop – Franck Leblanc Program pages for the Saturday Copenhagen Cup card can be viewed using links below: http://www.travbanen.dk/attachments/article/388/16-11MAJ14DEL1.pdf http://www.travbanen.dk/attachments/article/388/16-11MAJ14DEL2.pdf The Copenhagen Cup has a rich history, equine and human. The first three editions were won by the sport's legendary Charlie Mills driving Guy Bacon and Walter Dear (two wins). This pair were imported from the United States. Mills won again 29 years later with the equally legendary french mare Gelinotte. Winners of the Copenhagen Cup include many of the best in the history of the sport, including the late Moni Maker in 1998. Since Copenhagen Cup was introduced in 1975 there have been several  Danish victories including Hairos, Meadow Roland (three time winner), Legendary Lover K in 2002 and Wishing Stone in 2012. Dewayne Minor campaigned the last two in their successful US careers . The race record is held by the Italy’s Libeccio Griff , who scored in 1.10.7kr in 2011 for Bjorn Goop. Previous Winners Year Horse1 Driver Winning time 2013 Mr. Picolit Åke Svanstedt 1:11,7a 2012 Wishing Stone Jeppe Juel 1:11,3a 2011 Libeccio Grif Björn Goop 1:10,7a 2010 Nu Pagadi Erik Adielsson 1:11,7a 2009 Triton Sund Örjan Kihlström 1:12,8a 2008 Ghibellino Roberto Andreghetti 1:12,4a 2007 Kool du Caux Jean-Michel Bazire 1:12,0a 2006 Mara Bourbon Jean-Pierre Dubois 1:12,2a 2005 Steinlager Per-Oleg Midtfjeld 1:13,5a 2004 Revenue Lutfi Kolgjini 1:12,6a 2003 Gidde Palema Åke Svanstedt 1:13,5a 2002 Legendary Lover K Steen Juul 1:12,7a 2001 Victory Tilly Stig H. Johansson 1:13,4a 2000 Indian Silver Stig H. Johansson 1:12,8a 1999 Giesolo de Lou Jean-Etinne Dubois 1:13,5a 1998 Moni Maker Wally Hennessy 1:12,6a 1997 Zoogin Åke Svanstedt 1:14,1a 1996 Triple T Storm Joseph Verbeeck 1:14,1a 1995 S J's Photo David Wade 1:12,8a 1994 Bolets Igor David Wade 1:13,2a 1993 Campo Ass Wilhelm Paal 1:14,6a 1992 Bravo Sund Jorma Kontio 1:14,9a 1991 Glass Hanover Henning Beckemeyer 1:14,5a 1990 Meadow Roland Preben Kjærsgaard 1:13,5a 1989 Meadow Roland Preben Kjærsgaard 1:14,6a 1988 Meadow Roland Preben Kjærsgaard 1:14,4a 1987 Hairos John K. Hansen 1:14,0a 1986 Junior Lobell John K. Hansen 1:13,6a 1985 Minou du Donjon Olle Goop 1:14,0a 1984 Lutin d'Isigny Jean-Paul Andree 1:13,8a 1983 E.O. Brunn Bo W. Takter 1:13,9a 1982 Ideal du Gazeau Eugene Lefevre 1:14,0a 1981 Jorky Leopold Verroken 1:16,3a 1980 Ideal du Gazeau Eugene Lefevre 1:14,6a 1979 Charme Asserdal Heikki Korpi 1:15,5a 1978 Pershing Berndt Lindstedt 1:14,2a 1977 Keystone Pioneer William Haughton 1:15,0a 1976 Wiretapper Sören Nordin 1:17,2a 1975 Ritha Lyngholm Olle Lindquist 1:18,0a 1966 Roquepine Jean-René Gougeon 1:16,9a 1964 Elaine Rodney Jean-René Gougeon 1:15,4a 1962 Eidelstedter Johannes Frömming 1:21,0 1961 Rulle Rappson Sören Nordin 1:21,4 1960 Hairos II Willem Geersen 1:17,0a 1959 Jens Protector Trygve Diskerud 1:16,3a 1958 Adept Kurt Mattson 1:21,5 1957 Gelinotte Charlie Mills 1:18,7 1952 Frances Bulwark Sören Nordin 1:22,3 1951 Rollo Ragnar Thorngren 1:17,8 1949 Presidenten Casino The Great Folke Bengtsson Fredi Sølberg 1:23,1 1:22,7 1948 Harvest Druien Niels Jan Koster 1:23,8 1946 Future Aage Kristoffersen 1:19,9 1939 Sonny Diamond Niels Jan Koster 1:21,1 1938 Sir Walter Scott Calle Schoug 1:22,1 1932 Walter Dear Charlie Mills 1:19,6 1931 Walter Dear Charlie Mills 1:18,4 1928 Guy Bacon Charlie Mills 1:19,4 1 Country of owner (Wikipedia chart above) One of the most eventful, in this reporters opinion, Copenhagen Cup races was the 2006 edition when parked out Mara Bourbon gained advantage just before the line and held off charging Giant Diablo for the victory. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qloX5wLbL8 - 2006 Copenhagen Cup by Thomas H. Hicks, for Harnesslink.com

This morning's qualifying race feature at the Meadowlands was another hanress racing monster match up pitting 2013 Horse of the Year Bee A Magician against last year's aged trotting horse of the year Market Share.   This week the gloves came off with Market Share. Driver Tim Tetrick sent him right to the front and won off by himself in 1:52.4 with the last half in 54.4 and final quarter in 27.1 on his own. Bee A Magician was making her first start back since winning the Moni Maker last fall and Brian Sears held her in fourth most of the mile then let her trot through the stretch, finishing third in a useful effort.   The first race was a 3YO filly trot and Lifetime Pursuit led all the way after leaving from post ten to win in 1:54.2 finishing the mile with a pair of 28 second quarters. She was in hand for Yannick Gingras throughout, looking sharp. She is trained by Jimmy Takter (as is second place finisher Scream And Shout) and owned by Brittany Farms.   Race two saw 2013 Valley Victory winner Muscle Network (racing without trotting hopples) lead all the way for Dave Miller only to go off stride in the last 100 yards of the 1:54.4 mile. Skates N Plates followed him willingly and was ultimately was beaten a length or so. Nuncio was reserved well off the fractions and closed boldly into the 28 second final quarter in a visually impressive display.   Propulsion, a son of Muscle Hill and the dam Danae that raced only in qualifiers at two, was the third race winner for Mike Lachance in 1:56.1. He was the beneficiary of another late breaker, Green Hornut, who had set the fractions before he went off-stride in the final eighth.   Pacers took the track for race four and Bakersfield was the winner, besting a group of sophomore colts in 1:53, last quarter 27.1 in hand to Ron Pierce from the Takter barn. El Bloombito cut the mile and held for second.   Doo Wop Hanover won the fifth in convincing fashion for John Campbell in 1:51.2 / 26.3. He sat a pocket until the three quarters, ripped out and sailed by. Capital Account was a good second and Dancin Yankee a flying third.   Three year old filly pacers were up next and Tony Alagna's Sandbetweenurtoes looked strong winning in 1:54.2 / 27- for Tim Tetrick. Lotsa Matzah was second, It Was Fascination and She's Dangerous finished in tandem a closing third and fourth.   Derby simulcast goes on all day here at The Meadowlands with a large crowd expected. Live racing resumes at 7:15pm.   by Nick Salvi, for the Meadowlands  

Moni Maker, the trotting mare who was 1998 and 1999 Horse of the Year, died Friday morning (May 2) at New Bolton Center, veterinary hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, after complications from colic surgery. She was 21. Moni Maker won $5.58 million and 67 of 109 starts in six seasons of racing in North America, France, Denmark, Sweden and Italy. She was only ten times worse than third in her long career, in which her lifetime mark of 1:52.1 was set at age seven. The daughter of Speedy Crown-Nan's Catch was born February 23, 1993 at Cane Run Farm in Kentucky and was originally named Nursery Rhyme. She was voted Dan Patch Trotting Mare of the Year in 1997 through 2000, the year she retired. Moni Maker was inducted into the Harness Racing Hall of Fame in 2006. The tall (nearly 17 hands) bay mare regularly beat male horses and in her final start, she donned a saddle and got the services of Hall of Fame Jockey Julie Krone in breaking the world record for trotting under saddle in 1:54.1, a mark set in October of 2000 which still stands. Owned by the Moni Maker Stable and trained as a 2- and 3-year-old by Bill Andrews and later by Jimmy Takter, she has lived since retirement in 2000 at the Connecticut farm of one of her owners, Lindy Farms, owned by the Antonacci family. Her eight foals, all fillies, have won a collective $315,904. Moni Maker’s foals have lately been born via embryo transfer, and at the time of her passing, a recipient mare was carrying her Muscle Hill foal, confirmed David Reid, a partner in the Moni Maker stable. “It’s a sad and emotional day for all of us,” he said. Moni Maker’s wins read like a travel itinerary -- the 1996 Hambletonian Oaks at The Meadowlands in New Jersey, the Elitlopp in Sweden and the Copenhagen Cup in Denmark in 1998, the Prix d’Amerique in France in 1999 and the Trot Mondial in Montreal in 2000. She retired as the richest female racehorse of any breed, with $5,589,256. Her life has been a quiet one in retirement, living on Lindy Farm, near Hartford, largely outside with a shed, as was her preference, with a mare named Dream On Candy. She survived a disaster in 2011, when a fast-falling snowstorm caused the roof of the barn she was in to collapse. She retained a quirk, dating back to her racing days, not wanting to be caught. “She chased the kid that looked after her, Roman Kogalin, out of the paddock many times, like a bull,” said Jimmy Takter. “If he had to call someone else to help, suddenly she’d come up to that person. I think she enjoyed messing with him.” Frances Sutherland, who has been caring for Moni Maker for 14 years, got the same treatment. “You had to have a feed bucket to go out and catch her,” she said. “You had to ask her how she felt that particular day.” The toll of her years has only slowed down her diversionary tactics. “She just keeps walking, says Katie Jonas, another Lindy Farm caretaker. “She’s like, 'No, no, not today, not today.'” Frank Antonacci, a partner in her ownership group, and owner of Lindy Farm, has seen the mare several times a day for 14 years, as he drove by her paddock. “She is far and away, without a doubt, the best horse we have ever owned,” he said. “Nothing else is even close. She was always on her “A” game, no matter what. Never had a bad race.” Jimmy Takter, who has trained a raft of good horses since Moni Maker, recognizes the trip of a lifetime she provided to her connections. “It was a heck of a good journey with her, something nobody else experienced like we did,” he said. “She was a dream horse. The whole group of us, the owners and me, Wally (Hennessey, her driver), we owe everything to this girl. She made it look very easy for us.” by Ellen Harvey, for Harness Racing Communications

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