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The Paulickreport.com printed this following letter from Joe Gorajec who served as the executive director of the Indiana Horse Racing Commission for 25 years (1990-2015). He is also a former chairman of the Association of Racing Commissioners International (2008). To: Ed Martin, president of the Association of Racing Commissioners International (RCI): I read with great interest your testimony before Congress last month in the hearing regarding the Horseracing Integrity Act of 2017. In your remarks, you defended our current system of medication regulation in the United States and stated there is “total uniformity in the use of progressive penalties and substantial uniformity in adoption of testing thresholds for 30 appropriate medications deemed normal and appropriate for equine care.” You also stated, “horseracing does as good a job or as bad a job as the Olympics or any other sport.” Given your faith in the effectiveness of our model and your standing as the president of RCI, I would like you to review the following series of cases in Pennsylvania. Please let me know if the actions taken (or not taken) in these cases constitute the high praise that you believe our regulatory system deserves. I'll begin on Sept. 22, 2016, with a qualifying race at the Meadows harness track near Pittsburgh, Pa. Shawn Johnston trained a horse that day named Tremor Hanover. The Pennsylvania Equine Testing & Research Laboratory (PETRL) subsequently found that Tremor Hanover raced with impermissible levels of the drug betamethasone. Betamethasone is a corticosteroid and is listed as a Class 4 therapeutic medication. The Association of Racing Commissioners International's (RCI) Controlled Therapeutic Substance List indicates that betamethasone is impermissible at levels in excess of 10 picograms per milliliter (pg/ml) of blood. In other words, over 10 pg/ml is a positive test. The RCI's Penalty Guidelines indicate that the penalty for betamethasone (Class 4) overage for a first drug offense within a year is a minimum $1,000 fine and forfeiture of the purse. Mr. Johnston waived his right to a split sample and accepted the standard penalty of a $1,000 fine. No purse forfeiture was necessary as qualifying races do not have purses. On Aug. 30, 2016, approximately three weeks before Mr. Johnston's positive test, Rich Gillock trained a horse named Treasure Quest K that raced at Meadows. The PETRL subsequently found that Treasure Quest K raced with an impermissible level of betamethasone. The horse finished third. The purse was $9,500. On Nov. 26, 2016, at the same Meadows track, Ron Burke trained a horse named Atta Boy Dan. The PETRL subsequently found that Atta Boy Dan raced with an impermissible level of betamethasone. The horse won. The purse was $20,000. To read the rest of the article click here. 

Thursday, July 5, 2018 -  In the aftermath of the US Supreme Court ruling which clears the way for states to authorize and regulate wagering on sports other than horseracing, the ARCI will consider expanding its portfolio beyond wagering on pari-mutuel horse and greyhound contests to those involving human athletes and teams. When it meets next Tuesday and Wednesday in Omaha, Nebraska, the ARCI Model Rules Committee will consider taking the first step in this direction by working on a set of model regulations based upon the existing sports betting rules currently in place in Nevada. “Up until recently, except for Nevada, the only legal sports wagering authorized has been on horse or greyhound racing.   The regulatory structure in place for these sports and the processing of wagers can easily be adopted to accommodate wagering on other sports,” ARCI President Ed Martin said. The proposed rules to be considered parallel the rules currently in place by the only ARCI Member that has been regulating sports wagering – the Nevada Gaming Control Board.  He predicted that the Association would give preliminary approval to the interim rules to provide some level of guidance to state agencies being assigned this regulatory responsibility.  The ARCI Board will also consider an amendment to its By Laws creating a new class of member, government agencies that regulate sports betting.   While those ARCI members who are stand-alone horse racing commissions may have nothing to do with sports betting should it be authorized in their state, other ARCI member agencies in New York, Massachusetts, Michigan, Florida, Iowa and South Dakota may have this added to their regulatory responsibilities.   The ARCI has considerable experience in working with affected constituencies in the development of model regulatory policies and it is anticipated that a process will be created and defined to ensure that any league, team, federation or individual athlete involved with the conduct of a human sport for which sports betting will occur will be given the opportunity to participate.   The ARCI has already reached out to the major sports leagues and gaming companies. The ARCI standards currently cover occupational and entity licensure, technology standards for the processing of wagers, consumer protections, and security matters.  Each of these has a degree of adaptability to sports wagering. The Model Rules Committee agenda and all pending items to be considered can be accessed through the committee’s website http://www.arcimodelrules.online/ The committee will also consider: A modification to the recently adopted Model Rules concerning concussion protocols in flat racing A proposal from the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau (TRPB) concerning horse ID and chip technology A United States Trotting Association (USTA) protocol to combat “bearded” trainers From the Association of Racing Commissions International        

It's been 279 days since controversial California harness racing trainer Lou Pena last lined up a horse on race-day. One day after being granted permission to train and own standardbreds again Pena is now seriously thinking about switching codes.

Controversial North American harness racing trainer Lou Pena can train and own racehorses again. The 44-year-old had his licence reinstated today (Wednesday February 27) by the New York Gaming Commission.

The Board of Directors of Racing Commissions International has voted to move forward with a major revision of the association's model medication rules for horse racing.

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